User:Visviva/NYT 20080425

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2008-04-24) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2008-04-25
  • List status: open
→ Next (2008-04-26)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-04-25 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

87615 tokens ‧ 62725 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8610 types ‧ 18 (~ 0.209%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-04-25[edit]

  1. amboyna
    • 2008 April 25, Wendy Moonan, “Making Their Way Back to the Garden”, New York Times:
      Stephen Miller Siegel has a rare amboyna wood and ivory coffee table by Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann, Jules Leleu screens and a Alfred Auguste Janniot “Rape of Europa” sculpture.
      add
  2. cartonnier
    • 2008 April 25, Wendy Moonan, “Making Their Way Back to the Garden”, New York Times:
      Only Charlotte Moss incorporated real antiques: a set of Louis XV chairs, a 19th-century Italian bureau cabinet, a 19th-century French cartonnier to hold documents and an antique rug from Stark.
      add
  3. copolyester
    • 2008 April 25, Ian Austen, “Plastic-Bottle Scare Is a Boon for Some”, New York Times:
      Since February, those Aladdin products have been made with Tritan copolyester, a product that Eastman introduced last October, in what has since become a happy coincidence.
      add
  4. draftmates
    • 2008 April 25, Mike Ogle, “Top N.F.L. Pick Exhales; Others Hold Breath”, New York Times:
      And when it came time for a question-and-answer session with the six prospects in town for the draft, the children tossed Long softball questions as his draftmates had to sweat out the tough ones.
      add
  5. fritillaria
  6. groupspeak
    • 2008 April 25, George Vecsey, “Where Wild Things Are, Again”, New York Times:
      This impressive mammal seemed on the verge of extinction, a victim of enlightenment and manners and corporate groupspeak.
      add
  7. keratinous
    • 2008 April 25, George Vecsey, “Where Wild Things Are, Again”, New York Times:
      For a while, there were fears we were losing the awesome roars and fearsome wallowing and general flailing of the dangerous “upright keratinous horns on the snout” (to quote the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary).
      add
  8. manipulatives
  9. methylnaltrexone
    • 2008 April 25, Bloomberg News, “U.S. Allows Sale of Drug to Treat Constipation”, New York Times:
      The medicine, known chemically as methylnaltrexone, stops opioids from interfering with bowel movements, while allowing the drugs to continue blocking pain.
      add
  10. painterliness
    • 2008 April 25, Roberta Smith, Karen Rosenberg And Ken Johnson, “Art in Review”, New York Times:
      The idea is that the artists in this show fuse the scale, painterliness and frequent performance aspects of postwar abstraction with the grittiness of contemporary street and graffiti art, which this gallery is known to favor.
      add
  11. penseroso
    • 2008 April 25, Alastair Macaulay, “Four New Works, With Three From a Different Species”, New York Times:
      The diversity of this opening alone makes us feel that Mr. Morris is saying, “Look, people can be closed and open, allegro and penseroso, controlled and audacious.”
      add
  12. polyethersulfone
    • 2008 April 25, Ian Austen, “Plastic-Bottle Scare Is a Boon for Some”, New York Times:
      Born Free, a baby bottle maker based in Israel, relies on polyethersulfone rather than polycarbonate, said Ron Vigdor, the president of its distribution arm in the United States and a co-founder of the parent company.
      add
  13. postpainterly
    • 2008 April 25, Karen Rosenberg, “Looking Past the Cliché to See a Bit of the Edge”, New York Times:
      Here the airless, awkwardly shaped gallery is redeemed by several curiosities of postpainterly abstraction, among them Richard Kalina’s “Luquillo” (1970), a painting-sculpture hybrid made from polyester striped with acrylic and then folded, and Nicholas Krushenick’s neon-bright geometric silkscreens from the late ’60s.
      add
  14. sizzlingly
    • 2008 April 25, Allan Kozinn, “Drama, Energetic Drives and Colorful Dynamics”, New York Times:
      It was hard not to compare the sizzlingly fast, finely polished Mozart reading with Mr. Dutoit’s puzzlingly bland appearances with the orchestra in the mid-1980s, when he was making magnificent recordings with a handful of ensembles and giving thrilling performances with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in its frequent visits to New York.
      add
  15. soupily
    • 2008 April 25, Alastair Macaulay, “Four New Works, With Three From a Different Species”, New York Times:
      “The Ruins Proclaim the Building Was Beautiful” (to music by César Franck soupily arranged for orchestra by Rodney Sharman) lasts no more than 30 minutes, but only by clock time.
      add
  16. unhappinesses
  17. widebodies
    • 2008 April 25, “How to Rescue a Faltering Airline System”, New York Times:
      As editor of the American Airlines management newsletter in the 1970s, I reported on a period when the widebodies were introduced and American fleets were the envy of the world.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. weeeoooos
    • 2008 April 25, Dennis Hevesi, “Bebe Barron, 82, Pioneer of Electronic Scores, Is Dead”, New York Times:
      Bebe Barron, who with her husband Louis composed the first electronic score for a feature film — the eerie gulps and burbles, echoes and weeeoooos that accentuated invisible monsters and robotic creatures in the 1956 science-fiction classic “Forbidden Planet” — died Sunday in Los Angeles.
      add