User:Visviva/NYT 20080504

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2008-05-03) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2008-05-04
  • List status: open
→ Next (2008-05-05)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-05-04 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

185516 tokens ‧ 136527 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13789 types ‧ 118 (~ 0.856%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-05-04[edit]

  1. aspirationalism
    • 2008 May 4, Virginia Heffernan, “VoilSort Of)!”, New York Times:
      At the upfronts I always learned something too about what the American people want: heartwarming dramas, women’s stuff, sports, heroism, complex characters, real people, guilty pleasures, eye candy, names they can trust, ambiguous villains, simple comedies, hipster hipness, good old-fashioned values, edginess, upscaleness, satire, science fiction, girls, boys, Latinas, crime procedurals, urban sitcoms, aspirationalism, a way to express their anger.
      add
  2. beckoner
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Charlotte Druckman, “Pavlov Was Right”, New York Times, page 26:
      A Japanese tapered brass beckoner has a certain Brancusi-esque appeal ($75 at Turpan, Santa Monica, Calif.; 310-451-9500).
      add
  3. bikemaker
  4. binger
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Christine Muhlke, “The Talk”, New York Times, page 51:
      / crooked, off-center or askew, as in, “That wonky cake pan I picked up in Paris makes each slice a different size — perfect for the office anorexic and binger alike!”; slightly odd or eccentric, i.e., “His pink folding bicycle is a little wonky, but he won’t leave home without it.”
      add
  5. bonjour *
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Alexandra Jacobs, “Blame the Messager”, New York Times, page 60:
      Say bonjour to the botched R.S.V.P. The practice of replying to invitations, let alone actually showing up to parties as promised, has become as antiquated as the chimney sweep, and much messier.
      add
  6. bookchat
    • 2008 May 4, Troy Patterson, “The Trouble With Harry”, New York Times:
      Sarvas’s site, titled The Elegant Variation, has been remarking on the literary world for nearly five years, and though it lacks the righteous bile of Edward Champion’s Filthy Habits or the nourishing meatiness of Jessa Crispin’s Bookslut, it has made many worthy contributions to bookchat in that time — heralding the genius of the Irish novelist John Banville, for instance, and giving influential book-review editors the hard time they deserve.
      add
  7. boxoff
  8. broadway
    • 2009 2009-03-13, “Funky Town”, New York Times, page 84:
      AT broadway Panhandler.
      add
  9. brut *
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Toby Cecchini, “Mixing Metaphors”, New York Times, page 54:
      Rogue Ales’s Shakespeare Stout, with more heft and sweetness, made a much better foil for the Nicolas Feuillatte nonvintage brut, a lean, lighter-bodied wine with solid acids that lifted coffee aromas out of the stout.
      add
  10. bureks
    • 2008 May 4, “Cuisines in Bloom”, New York Times:
      This Albanian place may be the only restaurant in the city devoted entirely to bureks: savory pies that are the Balkans’ answer to pizza.
      add
  11. campane *
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Charlotte Druckman, “Pavlov Was Right”, New York Times, page 26:
      And the brothers Campana (the Italian word for “bell”) have teamed up with Venini to create a series of limited-edition mouth-blown campane for Moss.
      add
  12. cartoccio *
    • 2008 May 4, “Cuisines in Bloom”, New York Times:
      This longtime Italian favorite near Arthur Avenue has an epic menu of homemade pasta dishes like fusilli in cartoccio, with clams, mussels, shrimp and fresh tomato cooked in foil on the grill; and fresh grilled salmon topped with caramelized onions.
      add
  13. cavolo *
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Holly Brubach, “Amateur Husbandry”, New York Times, page 56:
      Her originality seems to reside primarily in devising unusual combinations, enhanced by the impeccable integrity of the homegrown ingredients: butternut squash soup with prosciutto and rosemary; sausage and fennel pizza ; penne with asparagus, fresh ricotta and green garlic; fettucine with shiitake mushrooms, cavolo nero and rosemary.
      add
  14. cheflike
    • 2008 May 4, Amanda Hesser, “1969: Chicken Canzanese”, New York Times:
      In a cheflike finishing touch, Pelaccio made a pan sauce with butter and served the hens with an arugula salad flecked with prosciutto and currants.
      add
  15. climactically
    • 2008 May 4, Troy Patterson, “The Trouble With Harry”, New York Times:
      Harry’s soul is battered by a “wave of anger,” “waves of despair,” “a sweaty wave of guilt, remorse and shame,” a “wave of queasy self-loathing” and, climactically, “a tsunami of loss.”
      add
  16. counterintuition
    • 2008 May 4, Nate Chinen, “New Album, New Fears, Same Old Attitude”, New York Times:
      Conflict and counterintuition have been motivating factors for the Roots ever since Mr. Thompson and Tariq Trotter, a k a the rapper Black Thought, joined forces to form the Square Roots in Philadelphia in the late 1980s, when they were in high school.
      add
  17. cringy
    • 2008 May 4, Virginia Heffernan, “VoilSort Of)!”, New York Times:
      The series features a fantastic, cringy scene set at the upfronts, and the whole show serves as an excavation of the prime-time TV life, from the high-flying ‘80s to the mystifying nows.
      add
  18. ensorcelling
    • 2008 May 4, Maureen Dowd, “This Bud’s for You”, New York Times:
      Obama, on the other hand, may seem esoteric, and sometimes looks haughty or put-upon when he should merely offer that ensorcelling smile.
      add
  19. fettucine
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Holly Brubach, “Amateur Husbandry”, New York Times, page 56:
      Her originality seems to reside primarily in devising unusual combinations, enhanced by the impeccable integrity of the homegrown ingredients: butternut squash soup with prosciutto and rosemary; sausage and fennel pizza ; penne with asparagus, fresh ricotta and green garlic; fettucine with shiitake mushrooms, cavolo nero and rosemary.
      add
  20. feuilletonist
    • 2008 May 4, Keith Gessen, “Pen and Sickle”, New York Times:
      The émigré feuilletonist Sergei Dovlatov was “very tall, dark and handsome, resembling the actor Omar Sharif.”
      add
  21. goatishness
    • 2008 May 4, A. O. Scott, “Here Comes Everyboy, Again”, New York Times:
      His occasional brushes with goatishness, like the womanizing firefighter he played in “Chuck and Larry,” tend not to come across as creepy or predatory, partly because he’s too playful to seem like much of a player.
      add
  22. hackwork
    • 2008 May 4, Roy Blount Jr., “So It Goes”, New York Times:
      It is better than the various antiwar short stories included, at least one of which, a fantasy, is quite good but most of which, though heartfelt, border on hackwork.
      add
  23. illegalization
    • 2008 May 4, Benedict Carey, “A Psychedelic ‘Problem Child’ Comes Full Circle”, New York Times:
      “Once the drug illegalization crowd gets hold of it, that’s that,” said Alexander Shulgin, a former Dow chemist who discovered the effects of MDMA, or ecstasy, which has also been made a controlled substance.
      add
  24. impracticalities
  25. innovational
  26. innovatively
    • 2008 May 4, Janet Rae-Dupree, “Can You Become a Creature of New Habits?”, New York Times:
      Researchers in the late 1960s discovered that humans are born with the capacity to approach challenges in four primary ways: analytically, procedurally, relationally (or collaboratively) and innovatively.
      add
  27. insanities
    • 2008 May 4, Frank Rich, “The All-White Elephant in the Room”, New York Times:
      When Rudy Giuliani, still a viable candidate, successfully courted Pat Robertson for an endorsement last year, few replayed Mr. Robertson’s greatest past insanities.
      add
  28. intuitives
    • 2008 May 4, Mark Oppenheimer, “The Queen of the New Age”, New York Times:
      Today the company turns out books, CDs, calendars and card decks by many of the titans of the large world that booksellers are now calling “Mind/Body/Spirit,” a category that includes the literature of psychics/intuitives, angel therapy, positive thinking, New Thought, water therapy and motivational speaking.
      add
  29. knottie
    • 2008 May 4, John Eligon, “I Take This Cyberpal to Be My Bridesmaid”, New York Times:
      “She’ll put on a face and say something like, ‘Oh, your knottie friends are more important than I am,’ ” said Ms. Salom, who also lives in Kendall.
      add
  30. knotties
  31. lardo *
  32. likker *
    • 2008 May 4, Mike Tierney, “Heard Is Chasing Lost Time After Hard Time”, New York Times:
      Heard, fueled by a cup of deep green pot likker and the “Rocky” theme blaring through earbuds, has barely broken a sweat, although this workout is the day’s second for him.
      add
  33. livener
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Toby Cecchini, “Mixing Metaphors”, New York Times, page 54:
      “It’s more of a livener.
      add
  34. maras
  35. margherita *
  36. metasubversion
    • 2008 May 4, Rob Walker, “This Joke’s for You”, New York Times:
      It’s interesting to consider the Brawndo project as metasubversion, making it possible to express knowing amusement at the absurdity of American commerce by buying something.
      add
  37. mongo *
    • 2008 May 4, Virginia Heffernan, “VoilSort Of)!”, New York Times:
      I’ll miss them: I’ve loved every minute of the cuckoo shows in the past, and I’ll probably never get to see those mongo entertainers at such close range again.
      add
  38. muscadelle
    • 2008 May 4, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Bordeaux, Blended Well”, New York Times:
      Mainly sauvignon blanc, the ’07 is perfectly balanced by sémillon and muscadelle.
      add
  39. noncorrelating
  40. nondescendant
  41. nondesperate
    • 2008 May 4, Helen Schulman, “Cheating Hearts”, New York Times:
      For Jean, who has found working from the island — with its “miniature rain forest and ... the jammed markets, the friendly, nondesperate people, the bright and thrillingly imperiled birdlife” — something of a “prolonged junket with sunshine and copy,” and who still thinks that a bit of jam stuck to the corner of her longtime husband’s mouth at breakfast is somehow endearing, the prospect of blowing up the marriage is fairly daunting.
      add
  42. nonmajor
  43. nonmilestone
    • 2008 May 4, A. O. Scott, “Here Comes Everyboy, Again”, New York Times:
      I’m not saying that’s especially old — I’ll beat him to that nonmilestone of early middle age by about two months — and I suppose there’s no reason to be surprised. Mr. Sandler has, it seems, been around forever.
      add
  44. nonregulated
    • 2008 May 4, C. J. Hughes, “Bigger Condos, North of Littler Italy”, New York Times:
      But five years ago, a rent increase in his nonregulated unit forced him to decamp for Bensonhurst, Brooklyn , he said.
      add
  45. nonsinger
    • 2008 May 4, Dennis Hevesi, “Peter Howard, 80, Dies; Put Music on Broadway”, New York Times:
      He spent many hours in a hotel room with the British actor and nonsinger Rex Harrison , coaching him to speak resonantly through six songs, including “I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face.”
      add
  46. nontitle
    • 2008 May 4, The Associated Press, “De La Hoya Is a Unanimous Winner”, New York Times:
      (AP) — In what was little more than a tuneup for a much bigger fight, Oscar De La Hoya kicked off his retirement tour Saturday by beating a game but overmatched Steve Forbes in a 150-pound nontitle bout.
      add
  47. nows
    • 2008 May 4, Virginia Heffernan, “VoilSort Of)!”, New York Times:
      The series features a fantastic, cringy scene set at the upfronts, and the whole show serves as an excavation of the prime-time TV life, from the high-flying ‘80s to the mystifying nows.
      add
  48. overschooled
    • 2008 May 4, Andrew Ferguson, “Don’t Know Much About History”, New York Times:
      In that book as in this one, Horwitz assumes the pose of a baby-boomer Everyman, overschooled but undereducated.
      add
  49. polytrack
    • 2008 May 4, Jane Smiley, “So Young, So Strong, So Fast and Oh So Very Sad”, New York Times:
      Fortunately, American racing authorities are finally waking up to the industrywide damage that a high injury rate does, and American racetracks are in the process of changing their racing surfaces from dirt to something called polytrack that is easier on the horses and rather similar to turf.
      add
  50. postconsumer
    • 2008 May 4, “Letters: The Green Issue”, New York Times:
      After reading your magazine, I thought, What would it have been like if the “green” issue were printed on postconsumer recycled fiber paper?
      add
  51. protoraves
  52. pseudomysterious
    • 2008 May 4, A. O. Scott, “Here Comes Everyboy, Again”, New York Times:
      ON June 6 a new Adam Sandler comedy — its pseudomysterious, catchphrase-ready title is “You Don’t Mess With the Zohan” — will open across the country.
      add
  53. rebodied
    • 2008 May 4, Jerry Garrett, “Final Cat From Ford’s Litter”, New York Times:
      But as I assessed the XF’s compromised curb appeal, what I saw was essentially a rebodied S-Type, the XF’s tired predecessor, with a new interior.
      add
  54. relock
  55. risibly
  56. salame *
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Christine Muhlke, “Packing A Wallop”, New York Times, page 28:
      The week’s haul might include fresh breakfast sausage, mortadella, orange and wild fennel salame, lardo and other porky items, with prices starting at $174 for three months.
      add
  57. sancocho *
    • 2008 May 4, “Cuisines in Bloom”, New York Times:
      The specialty is a changing roster of rich stews like oxtail, eggplant and sancocho, the classic brew of pork, pumpkin and root vegetables.
      add
  58. sayin
    • 2008 May 4, Jake Mooney, “When Spring Cleaning Includes a Power Plant”, New York Times:
      News of the demolition, which dismayed preservationists who still hope to see the building reused, trickled out awkwardly: In a March 12 posting on a neighborhood blog called “I’m not sayin, I’m just sayin,” a Con Edison spokesman was quoted dismissing the demolition option, telling the site’s anonymous author that workers seen on the site were “just doing some spring cleaning.”
      add
  59. scabrously
  60. securitizers
    • 2008 May 4, Alan S. Blinder, “The Case for a Newer Deal”, New York Times:
      A far less radical, though still regulatory, approach would require both originating banks and securitizers to retain some fractional ownership of each mortgage pool.
      add
  61. shojin
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Melissa Feldman, “Green Anchors”, New York Times, page 24:
      Broadway East, an edgy organic restaurant on the border of New York’s Chinatown, has a garden wall in its dining room — the perfect backdrop for eating shojin salad.
      add
  62. slipmanship
    • 2008 May 4, William Safire, “Misspeaking Too Soon”, New York Times:
      Students of verbal slipmanship along with a few cognitive neuroscientists took note of a speech in Santa Barbara, Calif., recently by the philosopher Daniel Dennett in which he used the computer-jargon noun thinko.
      add
  63. sociopathically
    • 2008 May 4, Terrence Rafferty, “Indiana Jones and the Savior of a Lost Art”, New York Times:
      In the 27 years since, practically every action filmmaker has tried to drink from the grail of Indiana Jones, to tap into the movie’s quasi-mystical kinetic (and commercial) power: the pace had to be blindingly fast; the stunts insanely elaborate, the villainy extra-villainous; the hero’s attitude blithe, insouciant, almost sociopathically cool. Mr. Spielberg and George Lucas — who produces the movies and who dreamed up the basic idea of the series — have a lot to answer for.
      add
  64. solemnify
    • 2009 2009-03-13, Toby Cecchini, “Mixing Metaphors”, New York Times, page 54:
      The drink dates to 1861, when it was allegedly concocted at Brooks’s, a Whig party hangout in London, to commemorate the death of Queen Victoria’s prince consort Albert (or, more accurately, as a smoke screen to solemnify taking a glass of either stout or Champagne on so mournful an occasion).
      add
  65. sploshed
    • 2008 May 4, Jonathan Miles, “What Not to Wear to a Cocktail Party”, New York Times:
      Then she lowered herself into a revolving cocktail-glass-shaped vat of purple liquid, where she kicked and sploshed before servers arrived bearing the Cointreau Teese, Miss von Teese’s new signature cocktail, on trays.
      add
  66. spokesmodel
    • 2008 May 4, Jonathan Miles, “What Not to Wear to a Cocktail Party”, New York Times:
      That’s the latest gambit from Cointreau, the French liqueur distiller, which recently was host to a party featuring the company’s new spokesmodel, the retro-glam burlesque performer (and former wife of Marilyn Manson ) Dita von Teese, splashing around in her skivvies inside a jumbo cocktail glass.
      add
  67. stathead
    • 2008 May 4, Stephen J. Dubner And Steven D. Levitt, “Hoop Data Dreams”, New York Times:
      But only recently have a few teams begun to hire a new breed of stathead to scrutinize every conceivable variable.
      add
  68. statheads
    • 2008 May 4, Stephen J. Dubner And Steven D. Levitt, “Hoop Data Dreams”, New York Times:
      Whether coincidence or not, this overlap was widely noted, and it is now standard practice for baseball teams to hire a flock of statheads and use their analyses to help make decisions on and off the field.
      add
  69. subpockets
    • 2008 May 4, Monica Davey, “Indiana Poses a Puzzle in the Primary Race”, New York Times:
      And there are other pockets and subpockets — around Fort Wayne, Evansville, South Bend, Terre Haute — each with its own complicated political tastes in a tangled mosaic that was created, mainly, by 19th-century immigration patterns.
      add
  70. summerful
    • 2008 May 4, Michael Cieply, “A Man of Steel With Feet of Clay”, New York Times:
      By their own account they keep pushing an increasingly corporate entertainment industry to do what scares it a little — and not just stick to a summerful of sequels and animated sure shots.
      add
  71. superhorse
    • 2008 May 4, William C. Rhoden, “Race Illustrates Brutal Side of Sport”, New York Times:
      Matz was the trainer of Barbaro, the superhorse who won here in 2006 and took that fatal misstep two weeks later at the Preakness.
      add
  72. taxidermied
    • 2009 2009-03-13, “Chow, Darling”, New York Times, page 90:
      For his own soiree, Kane went for somewhat more conventional decorations: on a side table, Apothia candles glimmered like fireflies, guarding a taxidermied owl, while masses of delphiniums, hydrangeas, lilacs and old Dutch roses perfumed the air.
      add
  73. trackworthy
    • 2008 May 4, Richard S. Chang, “Loving the Drive, Even After 5”, New York Times:
      Weekends, however, are a different matter: That’s when he gets to drive a trackworthy BMW , his 2002 M5.
      add
  74. uncrinkling
  75. unemployably
    • 2008 May 4, Troy Patterson, “The Trouble With Harry”, New York Times:
      The effect is of the Farrelly brothers shooting a remake of “About Schmidt” and leaving it to be cut together by an unemployably cynical editor.
      add
  76. uninspected
    • 2008 May 4, “China’s Unfair Trade”, New York Times:
      American consumers pay in other ways: unsafe and uninspected food, toys and medication, and higher local taxes when factories close.
      add
  77. unsatisfyingly
    • 2008 May 4, Helen Schulman, “Cheating Hearts”, New York Times:
      So what if some of the plotlines not only stay unsatisfyingly open, but feel even in the very last chapter as if they were just getting started?
      add
  78. unwelcomely
    • 2008 May 4, Terrence Rafferty, “Indiana Jones and the Savior of a Lost Art”, New York Times:
      And that’s true not only of the most egregious Indiana Jones knockoffs — the “Mummy,” “National Treasure” and “Lara Croft” movies spring, unwelcomely, to mind — but of nearly every studio picture that features more action than, say, “My Dinner With André.”
      add
  79. upscaleness
    • 2008 May 4, Virginia Heffernan, “VoilSort Of)!”, New York Times:
      At the upfronts I always learned something too about what the American people want: heartwarming dramas, women’s stuff, sports, heroism, complex characters, real people, guilty pleasures, eye candy, names they can trust, ambiguous villains, simple comedies, hipster hipness, good old-fashioned values, edginess, upscaleness, satire, science fiction, girls, boys, Latinas, crime procedurals, urban sitcoms, aspirationalism, a way to express their anger.
      add
  80. yuca *
    • 2008 May 4, “Cuisines in Bloom”, New York Times:
      Boiled yuca is served with house-made pickled red onions.
      add
  81. zoomy

Sequestered[edit]

  1. areaware
    • 2009 2009-03-13, “Funky Town”, New York Times, page 84:
      by mark sanders for areaware, $799. go to areaware.com .
      add
  2. artecnica
    • 2009 2009-03-13, “Funky Town”, New York Times, page 84:
      At macy’s herald square. tatu coffee table by stephen burks for artecnica, $550.
      add