User:Visviva/NYT 20080511

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-05-11 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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180774 tokens ‧ 132025 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13528 types ‧ 72 (~ 0.532%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-05-11[edit]

  1. aliteracy
    • 2008 May 11, Larry Doyle, “Cracking the Comics Code”, New York Times:
      Curiously the perfect weapon against rampant aliteracy emerged more than 50 years ago in the form of an utterly addictive synthesis of word and picture: the comic book.
      add
  2. antistigma
    • 2008 May 11, Gabrielle Glaser, “‘Mad Pride’ Fights a Stigma”, New York Times:
      In recent years, groups have started antistigma campaigns, and even the federal government embraces the message, with an ad campaign aimed at young adults to encourage them to support friends with mental illness.
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  3. autostradas
    • 2008 May 11, Eric A. Taub, “Ready for Its Hollywood Close-Up”, New York Times:
      In Los Angeles, though, most city streets are as wide as Italian autostradas, and parking spaces are defined by meters and lines.
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  4. ballfield
    • 2008 May 11, The Associated Press, “Wait Likely to Pay Off for Top Draft Prospect”, New York Times:
      “I think all these experiences he’s had at Vanderbilt, both educationally and on the ballfield, will help him in his dream to play professional baseball.”
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  5. bandito *
    • 2008 May 11, Jerry Griswold, “I, Chihuahua”, New York Times:
      Our kitten bandito heads south of the border (into the closet, that is), where he tangles with a wonderfully menacing bumblebee piñata.
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  6. barkless
    • 2008 May 11, Maggie Scarf, “The Fog of Love”, New York Times:
      Pearlie has managed to acquire a phone that purrs, but doesn’t ring; she has found a breed of barkless dog; she censors the newspapers by cutting out upsetting articles.
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  7. bloopiness
    • 2008 May 11, William Safire, “Wackadoodle”, New York Times:
      We now know that the greatest political sin of the campaign of 2008 is not inexperience, spotty memory, age, sex, race or serial bloopiness.
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  8. cavatelli
    • 2008 May 11, “Avenues of Change”, New York Times:
      There’s also a good selection of homemade pasta dishes like pappardelle with oxtail ragout; and cavatelli with fresh ricotta, eggplant, tomatoes and basil.
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  9. commandeur
  10. commandeurs
    • 2008 May 11, Rachel Donadio, “That Isn’t Lint on My Lapel, I’m an Officier”, New York Times:
      For everyday use, chevaliers and officiers wear a special hue of deep red thread sewn in a thin stripe from the buttonhole to the outer edge of the lapel, while commandeurs wear a silver thread.
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  11. confirmedly
    • 2008 May 11, Roger Sutton, “Because It’s Good for You”, New York Times:
      How could such confirmedly bookish types write an I-love-reading book so fundamentally tone deaf as to why reading can inspire love?
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  12. deadeye
    • 2008 May 11, Penelope Green, “The Mother Hood”, New York Times:
      The tartly funny Wolitzer is a miniaturist who can nail a contemporary type, scene or artifact with deadeye accuracy.
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  13. declinism
    • 2008 May 11, Josef Joffe, “The New New World”, New York Times:
      Yet Zakaria’s is not another exercise in declinism.
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  14. declinist
    • 2008 May 11, Josef Joffe, “The New New World”, New York Times:
      Again, Zakaria proceeds more subtly than the run-of-the-mill declinist by stressing American advantages not captured by growth rates and export surpluses.
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  15. destigmatization
    • 2008 May 11, Gabrielle Glaser, “‘Mad Pride’ Fights a Stigma”, New York Times:
      For some, the objective is to continue the destigmatization of mental illness.
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  16. dizains
    • 2008 May 11, David Orr, “Vendler’s Yeats”, New York Times:
      Fortunately, Vendler relishes the nitty-gritty of douzains and dizains, and the result is a meticulous, enlightening and strangely flawed study that adds plenty to the Yeats canon.
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  17. douzains
    • 2008 May 11, David Orr, “Vendler’s Yeats”, New York Times:
      Fortunately, Vendler relishes the nitty-gritty of douzains and dizains, and the result is a meticulous, enlightening and strangely flawed study that adds plenty to the Yeats canon.
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  18. flailings
    • 2008 May 11, Larry Doyle, “Cracking the Comics Code”, New York Times:
      Typically, comics appear as artifacts created by the main character, such as the eponymous “Captain Underpants” in Dav Pilkey’s wildly successful series, or Jimmy Jibbet’s heartfelt flailings in Jules Feiffer ’s wonderful “Man in the Ceiling.”
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  19. gloatingly
    • 2008 May 11, Rachel Donadio, “1958: The War of the Intellectuals”, New York Times:
      “That so uncompromising a work, written in prose of an artificiality and complexity that approaches the impenetrable — indeed often achieves it — that this should have become what the publishers gloatingly call ‘a runaway best-seller’ is something new.”
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  20. hyperconfident
    • 2008 May 11, Geraldine Fabrikant, “Humbler, After a Streak of Magic”, New York Times:
      All of which has left investors questioning whether Mr. Miller — a hyperconfident corporate handicapper who is famous for lugging annual reports to Baltimore Orioles games despite being an avid fan — has just hit a long-overdue rough patch or has lost his magic touch, or whether his fund has grown too large to produce the stellar returns it did in earlier years, when he was still relatively unknown.
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  21. inextricability
    • 2008 May 11, David Leavitt, “Styron’s Choices”, New York Times:
      Here, as in his novels, Styron demonstrates his genius for revealing the inextricability of the personal from the global.
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  22. innovatively
    • 2008 May 11, Alastair Macaulay, “Under Analysis: The Psychology of Tudor’s Ballets”, New York Times:
      And the most innovatively psychological episode — also the climax — is hers: the moment out of time when everyone else freezes and she alone moves, dancing out her conflicted feelings for a few seconds before returning to duty and repression.
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  23. intralinguistic
    • 2008 May 11, Jerry Griswold, “I, Chihuahua”, New York Times:
      For these dual-language students (they spend half the day learning in Spanish and half the day in English), it was clear that the Skippyjon Jones books — there are four so far, not counting board books and other spinoffs — were appealing mainly because of their intralinguistic wit, playfulness and musicality.
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  24. jimjilbang
    • 2008 May 11, Donald G. Mcneil Jr., “A Funhouse Floating in a Korean Spa”, New York Times:
      Inspa is an elaborate local copy of a jimjilbang, a traditional Korean 24-hour bathhouse where families soak, steam and eat together, and sometimes even sleep over.
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  25. jimjilbangs
    • 2008 May 11, Donald G. Mcneil Jr., “A Funhouse Floating in a Korean Spa”, New York Times:
      There are other jimjilbangs in the United States, Mr. Chon said, but none as large with big outdoor pools like his.
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  26. juvenophilia
    • 2008 May 11, George F. Will, “Bring Us Apart”, New York Times:
      Do we need to be reminded of that era’s gaseous juvenophilia, like Time magazine’s celebration of Americans 25 or younger as 1967’s “Man of the Year”: “This is not just a new generation, but a new kind of generation.
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  27. lagrein
    • 2008 May 11, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Spring Taste From Italy”, New York Times:
      Alto Adige (a k a South Tyrol), in northern Italy, loves lagrein, a local red grape.
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  28. micrographically
    • 2008 May 11, Virginia Heffernan, “Lexicographical Longing”, New York Times:
      The future is here, and the immortal O.E.D., the one that lives in bound pages last published micrographically in 1991, is obsolete — at least according to the folks who publish it.
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  29. midspring *
  30. multicurrency
    • 2008 May 11, Rob Walker, “Almighty Dolor”, New York Times:
      Your choices include single-currency C.D.’s — euros, Canadian dollars, British pounds, even Brazilian reais or Indian rupees — or multicurrency C.D.’s bundling predetermined baskets of denominations.
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  31. nichedom
    • 2008 May 11, John Markoff, “Do You Have That Portable in a Midsize?”, New York Times:
      Because of the company’s endless front-page promotional efforts on its Web store, however, the Kindle seems headed for nichedom.
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  32. nonhybrid
    • 2008 May 11, Lawrence Ulrich, “In New York, Parking Is Ever So Easy”, New York Times:
      While the Smart has the best fuel-economy rating of any nonhybrid sold in America, you’d expect far better numbers from its bite-size body.
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  33. nonwinner
  34. officier *
    • 2008 May 11, Rachel Donadio, “That Isn’t Lint on My Lapel, I’m an Officier”, New York Times:
      “Many, many countries have national awards,” said Richard Holbrooke , a former assistant secretary of state who was promoted to officier last fall in a ceremony conducted by his friend, the French Foreign Minister Bernard Kouchner .
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  35. officiers
    • 2008 May 11, Rachel Donadio, “That Isn’t Lint on My Lapel, I’m an Officier”, New York Times:
      For everyday use, chevaliers and officiers wear a special hue of deep red thread sewn in a thin stripe from the buttonhole to the outer edge of the lapel, while commandeurs wear a silver thread.
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  36. oystering
    • 2008 May 11, Lawrence Lanahan, “Steeped in History, With a Feel of the Brand New”, New York Times:
      SANDY GROUND In the 1830s, free blacks from Maryland and Virginia set up an oystering community in Rossville, and some of their descendants live there today — one in a home on Bloomingdale Road.
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  37. pinpointedly
    • 2008 May 11, Ben Ratliff, “Quiet Jazz, Roaring Noise, Hip-Hop Wizardry”, New York Times:
      Here his improvisations are pinpointedly focused on melody and swing, and he always has a mute in his trumpet; this is quiet jazz with organized locomotive force.
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  38. postboxing
    • 2008 May 11, Tim Arango, “Mike Tyson Film Takes a Swing at His Old Image”, New York Times:
      The film, along with a memoir that is still in its early stages — Mr. Tyson is collaborating with the author Larry Sloman, who has ghostwritten autobiographies for Howard Stern and Anthony Kiedis, the lead singer of the Red Hot Chili Peppers — are two parts of an effort that Mr. Tyson’s advisers hope will reintroduce him to the public and propel him to some semblance of a postboxing career.
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  39. prophylactically
    • 2008 May 11, Jennifer Senior, “Chronicle of a Death Foretold”, New York Times:
      Specifically, she had to decide whether to keep her breasts and ovaries or have them prophylactically removed.
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  40. quaaludes
    • 2008 May 11, Jacques Steinberg, “Take My Wife. Please. I’ll Take Yours.”, New York Times:
      WHEN the television series “Swingtown” has its premiere on June 5, viewers can expect to see the following scenes in the first episode: a ménage à trois; a high school junior smoking pot and later flirting with her English teacher; the flagrant enjoyment of quaaludes and cocaine; and the sight of the neighborhood scold unwittingly stumbling upon a groaning and slithering orgy.
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  41. ratmink
    • 2008 May 11, Larry Doyle, “Cracking the Comics Code”, New York Times:
      “Simon’s Dream,” the brand-new book in the series, involves thought-controlled flying couches and a final battle against the evil Dragon Lady and her hybrid ratmink minions, and reveals what really happened to the humans (“unforeseen consequences”) and why this trilogy exists.
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  42. reconsolidating
  43. rosato *
    • 2008 May 11, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Spring Taste From Italy”, New York Times:
      The 2007 rosato, which exudes scents of spring flowers, melds the flavors of cotton candy, strawberry and watermelon.
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  44. satchelful
    • 2008 May 11, Penelope Green, “The Mother Hood”, New York Times:
      Amy’s circle includes Roberta Sokolov, an artist turned full-time mother whose own career, like Amy’s, never quite blossomed, and Jill Hamlin, her best friend from college, who carries around a whole satchelful of disappointments: a failed dissertation, years of infertility, an inability to connect with her placid, adopted daughter.
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  45. scrawlings
  46. sidearmer
    • 2008 May 11, The Associated Press, “A Two-Way Player Does All at Bucknell”, New York Times:
      His pitching coach, Tyler Shepple, was a sidearmer at the University of Washington and played minor league ball.
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  47. sleepwise
    • 2008 May 11, Ben Shpigel, “With Ryan Church”, New York Times:
      Actually, sleepwise, it’s been relatively easy for me.
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  48. stashable
    • 2008 May 11, Virginia Heffernan, “Lexicographical Longing”, New York Times:
      The compact dictionary, which people like my dad received free from the Book-of-the-Month Club, made showoff etymology accessible, affordable and even stashable for the first time in modest American rec rooms and dens.
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  49. stinkies
    • 2008 May 11, Caitlin Flanagan, “Dial M for Mother”, New York Times:
      It’s as though from that first meconium diaper she’s stuck with your stinkies and foul-ups until she draws her last breath.
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  50. stockpickers
    • 2008 May 11, Geraldine Fabrikant, “Humbler, After a Streak of Magic”, New York Times:
      FOR 15 years through 2005, Bill Miller, one of the country’s most closely watched and widely worshiped stockpickers, made investments that handily beat stock market averages.
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  51. storeowner
    • 2008 May 11, Robert F. Worth, “Hezbollah Begins to Withdraw Gunmen in Beirut”, New York Times:
      Although most of Beirut was somewhat calmer than in previous days, a funeral for a Sunni government supporter erupted into bloodshed when a Shiite storeowner opened fire on the mourners.
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  52. swashed
    • 2008 May 11, Donald G. Mcneil Jr., “A Funhouse Floating in a Korean Spa”, New York Times:
      “THIS is the best night of my life!” burbled Rory as he was swashed in an inner tube around the whirlpool section of the outdoor hot pools at Inspa World.
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  53. technicolor
    • 2008 May 11, Penelope Green, “The Mother Hood”, New York Times:
      Amy and her friends aren’t total losers, they’re just not big technicolor winners.
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  54. tomboyism
    • 2008 May 11, “Something Wild”, New York Times:
      There is whooping and squirrel-watching and rock-throwing — an au courant tomboyism that remains free of mocking contemporaries for wearing lip gloss.
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  55. tribalesque
    • 2008 May 11, “Something Wild”, New York Times:
      Woodson, with her tale of three pseudo-tough girls in Queens, cares less about plot than does Murphy, with her longer, more traditionally paced novel about two girls who toughen up by painting their faces with tribalesque “war paint” and learning by the end of the novel that part of growing up is living by one’s own axioms, the ones that come from experience: “Sometimes, you gotta believe something crazy,” Sarah says, to explain why she obstinately holds on to the idea that her mother, who left the family when she was 2, has turned into an actual fox.
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  56. twerpy
  57. uncarefully
    • 2008 May 11, Jennifer Senior, “Chronicle of a Death Foretold”, New York Times:
      And for a book that’s so careful, she concludes uncarefully, asking and too easily answering all sorts of questions about the moral consequences of genetic advancements that deserve more nuance.
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  58. unconstructed
  59. undercaffeinated
    • 2008 May 11, Frank Rich, “Party Like It’s 2008”, New York Times:
      Barack Obama’s final, undercaffeinated debate performance, not to mention the Rev. Jeremiah Wright’s attempted character assassination, failed to slow his inexorable path to the Democratic nomination.
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  60. unknowables
    • 2008 May 11, “When We Last Saw Our Heroes ...”, New York Times:
      These enduring tales are full of delicious, slippery unknowables, but strangely, rather than retell the stories, Muth chooses in “Zen Shorts” to tell a story of someone retelling these stories.
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  61. vaquero *
    • 2008 May 11, Jerry Griswold, “I, Chihuahua”, New York Times:
      Snappy Spanglish wordplay ensues: a famous historical site in Peru is linked with a sneeze (“aaaaAAAAAAAHHCHOOOO-PICHU!”), a fiesta and a siesta take their turns, and in response to the question “Do you like rice and beans?” the visiting vaquero quips, “ Sí, I love mice and beans.”
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. spooner
    • 2008 May 11, Mark Leibovich, “Upside of Being Knocked Around”, New York Times:
      “One of Bush’s liabilities coming in was that he was seen as a silver spooner who had lived a charmed political life,” said Dan Bartlett, a top aide to Mr. Bush in Texas and in the White House.
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  2. unlabled = unlabeled or unlabelled
    • 2008 May 11, Colin Harrison, “Mrs. Corbett’s Request”, New York Times:
      Out came a dozen pieces of paper, a smaller envelope and an unlabled DVD. There was also a business card of a private investigator named James Hicks.
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