User:Visviva/NYT 20080513

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-05-13 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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107736 tokens ‧ 80228 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9691 types ‧ 48 (~ 0.495%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-05-13[edit]

  1. avobenzone
    • 2008 May 13, Catherine Saint Louis, “Applying a Balm to the Years”, New York Times:
      No need to go white-faced wearing zinc oxide anymore, just to protect against short UVB rays and longer UVA rays, said Dr. Amy Derick, a board-certified dermatologist in Barrington, Ill. Recently, the Food and Drug Administration has approved more broad-spectrum sunscreen products with Mexoryl SX, a European formula that is now widely available here and much less visible on the skin, she said. Dr. Derick also recommends Neutrogena sunscreens with Helioplex, which has a form of stabilized avobenzone for prolonged UVB/UVA effectiveness that won’t leave consumers feeling as if they’re “wearing a white mask.”
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  2. cabdriving
  3. cardiacwise
    • 2008 May 13, Gina Kolata, “More Than an Exercise in Vanity”, New York Times:
      “I think some folks outlive their muscles, meaning that they are fine mentally and cardiacwise but have so little muscle strength that they can’t catch themselves with their other leg when they start to fall,” Dr. Thompson added.
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  4. codefendants
    • 2008 May 13, William K. Rashbaum, “Plea Expected in Ring Tied to Spitzer”, New York Times:
      Several former prosecutors and defense lawyers said the movement toward resolving the charges against Ms. Lewis and her codefendants suggested that prosecutors were nearing a decision on whether to prosecute Mr. Spitzer.
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  5. cuds
  6. dilates *
    • 2008 May 13, Nicholas Bakalar, “Care of the Eyes Demands Diligence”, New York Times:
      But it should be a thorough exam in which the doctor dilates the pupils and examines the optic nerve.
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  7. diskectomies
  8. duckbilled
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      The third group of mammals, the monotremes, claims a measly three distinct animals, and all are indigenous to Australia and New Guinea: the duckbilled platypus and the long-beaked and short-beaked echidnas, also known as spiny anteaters.
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  9. electroreceptors
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      It’s time to start hunting for a living, to dive into a pond in search of crustaceans, which the platypus does with the help of chemoreceptors to smell the prey and electroreceptors to detect the minor electrical field surrounding the prey and mechanoreceptors to track movement of the prey and a toothless but tough horny bill for seizing and crushing the prey it has amply sensed.
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  10. engrained
    • 2008 May 13, Michael Luo, “A Usually Legal Practice That Wears Black Eyes”, New York Times:
      While the use of street money is not uncommon in Cleveland, in other places the expectation that it will be disbursed is more deeply engrained in the electoral infrastructure.
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  11. entwinings
    • 2008 May 13, Roslyn Sulcas, “Favorites Served With Punch, Not Pomp”, New York Times:
      But Mr. Maliphant’s repetitive circling torsos and windmilling arms, his sculptural entwinings, and lifts and falls — all to an overblown (and overamplified) score by Michael Hulls — ultimately seems less than the sum of its parts.
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  12. grublike
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      Placental mammals that gestate their young internally, as do we and most of the pelts we know, account for 95 percent of the world’s 5,600 species of mammals, and marsupials like the kangaroo, koala and our very own opossum, whose young are born at a grublike stage and do most of their developing externally, often in a pouch, constitute nearly all the rest.
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  13. hamartoma
  14. hydrofluoroalkanes
    • 2008 May 13, Laurie Tarkan, “Rough Transition to a New Asthma Inhaler”, New York Times:
      For one thing, the old inhalers cost much less — an average of $13.50, or one-third the price of a CFC-free inhaler, which uses propellants called HFAs, for hydrofluoroalkanes.
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  15. hyperreligiosity
    • 2008 May 13, David Brooks, “The Neural Buddhists”, New York Times:
      If they suffer from temporal lobe epilepsy, they will show signs of hyperreligiosity, an overexcitement of the brain tissue that leads sufferers to believe they are conversing with God.
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  16. kyphoplasty
    • 2008 May 13, Leslie Berger, “Back Pain Eludes Perfect Solutions”, New York Times:
      The jury is still out on kyphoplasty, an outpatient procedure for patients with vertebrae fracture from osteoporosis .
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  17. levalbuterol
  18. mousseline
    • 2008 May 13, William Grimes, “Paul Haeberlin, 3-Star Chef, Dies at 84”, New York Times:
      Mr. Haeberlin’s innovative spin on classical French cuisine — one of the restaurant’s signature dishes is a mousseline of frog’s legs — helped transform his family’s modest restaurant on the Ill River in Alsace into a culinary powerhouse that received its first Michelin star in 1952 and a second star five years later.
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  19. neuroanesthesiologist
    • 2008 May 13, Keridwen Cornelius, “A Child, a Bizarre Tumor and a Perilous Operation”, New York Times:
      It is 8 a.m. on April 20, 2007, and on the operating table at Barrow a nurse and a neuroanesthesiologist are trying to coax the anesthesia mask onto Grace’s mouth.
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  20. neuromas
    • 2008 May 13, Laurie Tarkan, “Think of Your Poor Feet”, New York Times:
      Heels contribute to hammertoes, neuromas (pinched nerves near the ball of the foot), bunions and “pump bump” (a painful bump on the back of the heel), as well as toenail problems.
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  21. neuronetworks
    • 2008 May 13, Roni Caryn Rabin, “For a Sharp Brain, Stimulation”, New York Times:
      “It will also buy you increases in the volume of various brain regions in the prefrontal and temporal cortex, and more efficient neuronetworks that support the kind of cognition we examined.”
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  22. nonmenthol
    • 2008 May 13, Stephanie Saul, “Cigarette Bill Treats Menthol With Leniency”, New York Times:
      Still, he points to several studies that suggest menthol smokers may be exposed to higher levels of dangerous compounds than nonmenthol smokers.
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  23. nonparticipation
    • 2008 May 13, Linda Greenhouse, “Justices’ Conflicts Halt Apartheid Appeal”, New York Times:
      That happened on March 3, when nonparticipation by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. resulted in a 4-to-4 tie in a case on the permissibility of damage suits against the makers of federally approved pharmaceuticals.
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  24. ocote
    • 2008 May 13, Elisabeth Malkin, “Ways of Ancient Mexico Reviving Barren Lands”, New York Times:
      To arrest erosion, Cedicam has planted trees, mostly native ocote pines, a million in the past five years, raised in the group’s own nurseries.
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  25. pastiched
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      That the genetic code of the platypus proved to be as bizarrely pastiched as its anatomy enhanced the popular appeal of the report, published in the journal Nature.
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  26. politiquera
  27. politiqueras
    • 2008 May 13, Michael Luo, “A Usually Legal Practice That Wears Black Eyes”, New York Times:
      In the threadbare border towns of South Texas, one of the country’s poorest regions, enterprising locals like Candelaria Espinoza have long been paid to round up votes for candidates on Election Day. There is even a name for these electoral soldiers of fortune: politiqueras.
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  28. poverties
    • 2008 May 13, Charles Isherwood, “Shepard’s Debtors of 1978, Sounding Like Today’s Poor”, New York Times:
      It’s a counterintuitive choice, given the ferociously anti-naturalistic bent of much of Mr. Shepard’s work, including this sprawling but often scabrously funny play about poverties of the spirit and the stomach.
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  29. prankishness
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      But the platypus trumps its plush-toy costars by adding a kind of Dada prankishness to the equation, what with its bill that looks like a Charlie Chaplin shoe, the leathery, thumb-sized eggs it insists on laying, the Daffy Duck webfeet outfitted with venomous spurs and the milk that dribbles down its unnippled chest.
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  30. premammalian
  31. rodenty
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      They are not our direct ancestors, but rather split off from the rodenty line that gave rise to us and marsupials some 180 million years ago, with marsupials breaking away maybe 40 million years later.
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  32. scabrously
    • 2008 May 13, Charles Isherwood, “Shepard’s Debtors of 1978, Sounding Like Today’s Poor”, New York Times:
      It’s a counterintuitive choice, given the ferociously anti-naturalistic bent of much of Mr. Shepard’s work, including this sprawling but often scabrously funny play about poverties of the spirit and the stomach.
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  33. showfa
    • 2008 May 13, Katherine Zoepf, “Love on Girls’ Side of the Saudi Divide”, New York Times:
      A cellphone picture of Alia’s fiancé — a 25-year-old military man named Badr — was passed around, and the girls began pestering Alia for the details of her showfa.
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  34. showfas
    • 2008 May 13, Katherine Zoepf, “Love on Girls’ Side of the Saudi Divide”, New York Times:
      But they seem to regard the idea of having a conversation with a man before their showfas and subsequent engagements with very real horror.
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  35. spearlets
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      While the poisonous spearlets are now directed largely against rival males, the trait could well have served among ancestral monotremes as the equivalent of a bee’s sting, to ward off the Bigfeet that ever threatened to crush them.
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  36. transurethral
    • 2008 May 13, Gerald Secor Couzens, “For Men, Relief in Sight”, New York Times:
      He recommends the transurethral resection of the prostate .
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  37. tripmates
    • 2008 May 13, Jane E. Brody, “Mosquito Thrives; So Does Dengue Fever”, New York Times:
      Though neither I nor my tripmates could tolerate full-body attire during Cambodia’s humid, 90-plus-degree days, we all doused ourselves daily with repellent.
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  38. unfrenetic
  39. unnippled
    • 2008 May 13, Natalie Angier, “A Gene Map for the Cute Side of the Family”, New York Times:
      But the platypus trumps its plush-toy costars by adding a kind of Dada prankishness to the equation, what with its bill that looks like a Charlie Chaplin shoe, the leathery, thumb-sized eggs it insists on laying, the Daffy Duck webfeet outfitted with venomous spurs and the milk that dribbles down its unnippled chest.
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  40. unradical

Sequestered[edit]

  1. browed
  2. cownose
    • 2008 May 13, Tyler Kepner, “Rodriguez Is Unlikely to Play Against Mets”, New York Times:
      CHECKING OUT THE RAYS On the Yankees’ first trip to Tropicana Field, Joe Girardi noticed the 10,000-gallon tank above center field that is home to more than 20 cownose rays.
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