User:Visviva/NYT 20080601

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-06-01 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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201041 tokens ‧ 147680 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 14116 types ‧ 85 (~ 0.602%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-06-01[edit]

  1. aglianico
    • 2008 June 1, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “Course Requirements: Good Nose and a Taste for Wine”, New York Times:
      On Tuesday, he learned even more. Ms. Frederick, who owns a wine consulting business in Manhattan but is better known among the Sommelier Society for her vintage lectures, gave the class a list of what she believed were the five best wine-making grapes in all of Italy: nebbiolo, sangiovese, sagrantino, aglianico and corvina.
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  2. anastrozole
  3. bibliohosts
    • 2008 June 1, Jane And Michael Stern, “French Toast”, New York Times:
      It is not just the canned pictures that make it difficult to relate to our omnipresent bibliohosts the way it is so easy to do in such disarming memoirs as Peter Mayle’s “Year in Provence” and Adam Gopnik’s “From Paris to the Moon.”
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  4. biergartens
    • 2008 June 1, “31 Places to Go This Summer”, New York Times:
      And towns like Fredericksburg offer a taste of the Old World, with German-style biergartens and schnitzelhäuser.
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  5. bloggy
    • 2008 June 1, Jim Windolf, “High Pants Forever”, New York Times:
      When Nugent describes his meetings with childhood friends from his nerd peer group, the bloggy tone gives way to precise storytelling.
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  6. broilings
    • 2008 June 1, Sam Sifton, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      Amid them, he offers definitive, simple and deadly effective recipes for brisket and cholent; crispy, sweet mandelbrot; Romanian broilings of various sorts; chopped liver and borscht; even fantastic if anti-kosher crossover meals like the Chinese roast pork sandwich on buttery garlic bread that came down from the Catskills in the 1950s to take up residence on the menus of family restaurants across the southern tier of this city.
      add
  7. cetuximab
  8. corvina *
    • 2008 June 1, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “Course Requirements: Good Nose and a Taste for Wine”, New York Times:
      On Tuesday, he learned even more. Ms. Frederick, who owns a wine consulting business in Manhattan but is better known among the Sommelier Society for her vintage lectures, gave the class a list of what she believed were the five best wine-making grapes in all of Italy: nebbiolo, sangiovese, sagrantino, aglianico and corvina.
      add
  9. dechlorinate
    • 2008 June 1, Dominique Browning, “Properly Soused”, New York Times:
      He tells us how, in a pinch, to dechlorinate tap water; extract the most juice from a lemon; give the illusion of a stiff drink by pouring gin over the back of a teaspoon, and so forth.
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  10. distractible
    • 2008 June 1, Mark Blankenship, “‘Passing Strange’”, New York Times:
      The show insists that art can express emotion more perfectly than we can in our distractible lives, and by absorbing patrons into “Keys,” it implies that we can all produce an artwork.
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  11. dramaturgically
    • 2008 June 1, “Mozart’s Rivals: A Neglected Contemporary”, New York Times:
      I hope this trend will encourage opera companies to look again at Giovanni Paisiello’s unfairly neglected Barbiere di Siviglia, dramaturgically superior to the Rossini version and, in many ways, a touchstone for several of the composers at the Viennese Court, including Mozart.
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  12. drumbeater
    • 2008 June 1, Frank Rich, “McCain’s McClellan Nightmare”, New York Times:
      He didn’t just cast a vote but was a drumbeater for the propaganda Mr. McClellan cites, including the neocon fantasies of a newly democratic Middle East.
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  13. dutybound
    • 2008 June 1, Victoria Burnett, “Spain’s Top Chefs Clash Over Ingredients and Culinary Innovations”, New York Times:
      In a recent telephone interview, Mr. Santamaría said that he felt dutybound to raise public awareness of techniques and ingredients that had catapulted Spanish cuisine to fame but were at odds, in his view, with Spanish traditions and a dedication to local and organic produce.
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  14. fireballers
    • 2008 June 1, Pat Borzi, “Swing Science: The Fine Points”, New York Times:
      Most pitchers fall into one of two categories: fireballers like the San Diego Padres ’ Jake Peavy or finesse pitchers like the Philadelphia Phillies ’ Jamie Moyer, who mixes a modest fastball with breaking pitches and changes in speed to keep batters off balance.
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  15. frik
    • 2008 June 1, “New Tastes of Bohemia”, New York Times:
      The tabbouleh — here called green wheat and made with frik, an heirloom bulgur wheat — is excellent.
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  16. giallo *
    • 2008 June 1, Terrence Rafferty, “Beauty, Brutality and Three Tough Mothers”, New York Times:
      Mr. Argento, 67, has devoted most of his career to the Italian suspense genre known as giallo, which designates a kind of hyperbolic serial-killer mystery, generally with urban settings and disturbingly creative murders.
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  17. golfistans
    • 2008 June 1, John Leland, “Using It Before Losing It”, New York Times:
      As Blechman notes toward the end, retirees may in fact be losing interest in golfistans like the Villages, which makes “Leisureville” perhaps less about the vanguard of a cultural shift than a parting glance at a fading consumer vision.
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  18. historicos
    • 2008 June 1, Damien Cave, “Democrats See Cuba Travel Limits as a Campaign Issue in Florida”, New York Times:
      The so-called historicos or historic exiles who arrived immediately after Cuba’s 1959 revolution have been dying off, even as their children move beyond a narrow focus on Cuba and as fresh waves of Cubans have poured in.
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  19. honeylike
    • 2008 June 1, Randy Kennedy, “Tree Proud”, New York Times:
      But it was August when we closed on the house, so the spindly branches were full of ripe brown figs. And it didn’t take long after eating a few right off the tree — honeylike and fragile, botanically not a fruit but an enclosed inflorescence, a flower wrapped up in itself — to understand why someone would try so hard to grow an essentially Mediterranean tree at such an unfriendly latitude.
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  20. hurricanos
    • 2008 June 1, Randy Cohen, “Kicked Out of the Play Group”, New York Times:
      Unless you anticipate a decline in the quality of your work — Antillean computer problems, cellphone vagaries, cataracts and hurricanos that spout until they drench your steeples and drown the cocks, sulfurous and thought-executing fires, oak-cleaving thunderbolts or simply the Siren song of the wi-fi-less beach — I don’t see why this is any of your supervisor’s business.
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  21. hydrocrats
    • 2008 June 1, Robert Sullivan, “Taming the Falls”, New York Times:
      Today, Niagara Falls can be turned on and off at the will of Canadian and American hydrocrats.
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  22. hyperpersonal
    • 2008 June 1, Baz Dreisinger, “Hope You Like Jamming Too”, New York Times:
      No, Jamaica is the land of versions, so they give us one: a hyperpersonal, very contagious celebration of their love affair with reggae and Jamaica — beaches, country and all.
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  23. inalterably
    • 2008 June 1, Rob Walker, “Water Proof”, New York Times:
      “Lipstick on a pig” was one reaction to its green marketing on Treehugger.com , where a reader poll on the question, “Can Fiji Water Be Green?” was won by the answer “No; it is still ‘fundamentally, inherently and inalterably unconscionable.’ ”
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  24. innovatively
    • 2008 June 1, Janet Rae-Dupree, “Da Vinci, Retrofitted for the Modern Age”, New York Times:
      Each of these personalities responded innovatively to the rapid changes taking place around them, drawing on the expertise of advisers while continuing to build on earlier successes.
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  25. insiderdom
    • 2008 June 1, Jill Abramson, “A Nod to the Insiders”, New York Times:
      The two senators have been tripping over each other to distance themselves from the taint of Beltway insiderdom.
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  26. insistance
    • 2008 June 1, Dorothy Spears, “’60s Legacy, Personal Histories”, New York Times:
      He said what interests him and his contemporaries most is not the killing of a teenager from Chicago visiting the segregated South but his mother’s insistance on keeping the coffin open at the public funeral, even though Emmett’s face had been beaten beyond recognition.
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  27. kova *
  28. langsats
    • 2008 June 1, Mary Roach, “Beyond Harry & David”, New York Times:
      He describes one variety of the stinking durian fruit as tasting like “undercooked peanut butter-mint omelets in body-odor sauce”; langsats are “tangy-sweet detonations of citric perfection”; biting into a monkey tamarind is “like eating cloud.”
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  29. lewisite
    • 2008 June 1, Robert Sullivan, “Taming the Falls”, New York Times:
      On the ground, there’s a long list of things the falls have made people want to do, including but not limited to the following: kill people to own the falls for navigational purposes; cross the falls on a tightrope while making an omelet; pay people off to own the falls for power-production purposes; pay people off to own them for scenic-enrichment purposes, covertly affiliated with the power purposes; inflict electrical consumption on a nation that first thought electricity was deadly but then, when it saw all the gadgets that could be bought, said, Electrify me!; use the falls to make chemicals to help make said gadgets, dumping the leftovers all over the place, especially in the infamous Love Canal; make more chemicals in the name of war — arsenic trichloride, for instance, which makes a gas called lewisite, now on terrorism watch lists; stay overnight in a hotel adjacent to the falls to inaugurate a long marriage (“Every American bride is taken there,” Oscar Wilde said, in the days before Niagara rhymed with Viagra ); bury nuclear waste in and around workers’ neighborhoods and not mention it; depopulate the city named after Niagara Falls by building a highway through it; attempt to repopulate the city by building a big mall (the Rainbow Center); attempt again with a casino; and, most recently, write a book that is wild and sometimes thrilling, as far as local history goes — like a ride over the falls in a barrel that turns out O.K., from which you emerge with a new view of Niagara as well as what we call nature.
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  30. lidia *
    • 2008 June 1, Michael Kimmelman, “Bullfighting Is Dead! Long Live the Bullfight!”, New York Times:
      Every lidia — an individual bullfight between a bull and a matador — is a ritual orchestrated to injure and then exhaust the animal so that it can be more easily killed.
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  31. mandelbrot
    • 2008 June 1, Sam Sifton, “Cooking”, New York Times:
      Amid them, he offers definitive, simple and deadly effective recipes for brisket and cholent; crispy, sweet mandelbrot; Romanian broilings of various sorts; chopped liver and borscht; even fantastic if anti-kosher crossover meals like the Chinese roast pork sandwich on buttery garlic bread that came down from the Catskills in the 1950s to take up residence on the menus of family restaurants across the southern tier of this city.
      add
  32. manless
    • 2008 June 1, Liesl Schillinger, “Romance Languages”, New York Times:
      Dara, “kind, intelligent, loyal and gainfully employed,” is nearly always manless, and even when she has somebody, he’s never the sort who could turn into a husband.
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  33. mesquites
    • 2008 June 1, Randy Kennedy, “Tree Proud”, New York Times:
      When I inherited this dream, my fig frankly didn’t look like much of a tree, any more than the low, gnarled mesquites that passed for trees in the part of West Texas where I grew up.
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  34. midstroll
    • 2008 June 1, Richard Sandomir, “From Clay to Bronze to the Hall”, New York Times:
      Behrends has chiseled the official Senate bust of the disgraced Vice President Spiro T. Agnew ; molded a bronze bust of Andrew Johnson , who became president after Abraham Lincoln ’s assassination, for the Tennessee state capitol; and created a statue of Strom Thurmond , in midstroll, for the lawn of the South Carolina State House in Columbia.
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  35. minirefrigerator
  36. musterings
  37. nebbiolo *
    • 2008 June 1, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “Course Requirements: Good Nose and a Taste for Wine”, New York Times:
      On Tuesday, he learned even more. Ms. Frederick, who owns a wine consulting business in Manhattan but is better known among the Sommelier Society for her vintage lectures, gave the class a list of what she believed were the five best wine-making grapes in all of Italy: nebbiolo, sangiovese, sagrantino, aglianico and corvina.
      add
  38. nonconstruction
    • 2008 June 1, Devan Sipher, “Maria Serghides and George Orfanakos”, New York Times:
      They coordinated volunteers and helped in nonconstruction tasks like building furniture and hanging pictures.
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  39. nondesigners
    • 2008 June 1, Steven Heller, “Visuals”, New York Times:
      Today, the computer has turned many unschooled nondesigners into ersatz typographers.
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  40. nongardeners
    • 2008 June 1, Brent Staples, “Save the Shade”, New York Times:
      As the National Wildlife Federation noted in a report last year, gardeners are experiencing global warming in ways that nongardeners are unlikely to notice.
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  41. nonpolitician
    • 2008 June 1, “Truth to Power”, New York Times:
      Ike was the last nonpolitician elected president, and his moderate vision of American government and the restrained use of American power provide potent lessons in how to truly govern from the center.
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  42. nonregistered
    • 2008 June 1, Damien Cave, “Democrats See Cuba Travel Limits as a Campaign Issue in Florida”, New York Times:
      The Florida International University poll found that the 55.2 percent majority favoring unrestricted travel was the product of a sharp divide — 74 percent of nonregistered voters supported the idea, while 58 percent of the registered voters opposed it.
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  43. nonsupernatural
    • 2008 June 1, Terrence Rafferty, “Beauty, Brutality and Three Tough Mothers”, New York Times:
      Although “Suspiria,” his sixth feature, was an enormous hit, and one of his most striking exercises in style, he has nonetheless continued in the 30 years since to stick pretty closely to the nonsupernatural giallo form and its more mundane manifestations of wild, destructive unreason.
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  44. nonsurvivor
  45. overplanned
    • 2008 June 1, Lee Conell, “My Dropout Boyfriend Kept Dropping In”, New York Times:
      This I defended to friends who gaped at the news by telling them that he was acting against the system, against the overplanned life of studying, choosing our majors, plotting out our meek life goals.
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  46. paralympic
    • 2008 June 1, The Associated Press, “A Win for Pistorius”, New York Times:
      Oscar Pistorius of South Africa won the 200 meters at the Dutch Open for paralympic athletes in Emmeloord.
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  47. partygoing
    • 2008 June 1, Joshua Hammer, “Travel”, New York Times:
      Corbett finds a job he isn’t “qualified for, much less interested in,” lands a hideously furnished flat in the Marais and joins a circle of partygoing fellow expatriates, whom he annoyingly calls the “Paris Posse.”
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  48. peripatetically
    • 2008 June 1, David Colman, “A Timely Way to Go Back in Time”, New York Times:
      But this stance is not born of some French-fried patriotism, or some urge to peripatetically wander the countryside.
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  49. postcolonialism
    • 2008 June 1, Baz Dreisinger, “Hope You Like Jamming Too”, New York Times:
      Jamaicans transformed sundry scraps into treasures, creating the aural equivalent of a scrapbook: postcolonialism with bass.
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  50. postworkout
    • 2008 June 1, Gretchen Reynolds, “Swallow This”, New York Times:
      Start with your postworkout meal.
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  51. powerlifter
    • 2008 June 1, Bryan Curtis, “A Very Dirty Movie”, New York Times:
      The 35-year-old was a competitive powerlifter before genetics—he stands 5-foot-6 on a good day—forced a career change and sent him off to the University of Southern California ’s film school.
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  52. prefatigued
    • 2008 June 1, Virginia Heffernan, “Personalize This”, New York Times:
      Anime-style creatures in Flash already saturate television and the Internet, so I was prefatigued by the cartoons of Katsuhiko Hibino, Christophe Lopez-Huici, Alice Mak and Nagi Noda.
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  53. pyracantha
    • 2008 June 1, Randy Kennedy, “Tree Proud”, New York Times:
      A few summers ago, an evil pyracantha shrub that blocked some of its sunlight was sacrificed in its honor.
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  54. qualitatives
    • 2008 June 1, Joyce Cohen, “A Handyman’s Special”, New York Times:
      “That was one of those qualitatives or intangibles that made it nice to choose Dan,” Mr. Brandt said.
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  55. rebonding
    • 2008 June 1, Larry Dorman, “Surf and Turf”, New York Times:
      IN THE WEEKS he has not competed in Tour events, Mickelson has been spotted playing at Torrey Pines, walking and carrying his clubs, rebonding with the course of his youth.
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  56. redos
    • 2008 June 1, C. J. Hughes, “Where Change Is Underfoot, and Overhead”, New York Times:
      Eight years ago, the apartment cost $292,000, and the three redos totaled $48,000, but though he has no plans to sell, he thinks he could get $600,000 for the place today.
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  57. resortland
    • 2008 June 1, Baz Dreisinger, “Hope You Like Jamming Too”, New York Times:
      — culture in resortland proved a smart strategy; today Jamaica is to the Caribbean as Starbucks is to coffee: the brand name that inspires fervent fidelity and chronic visits.
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  58. sagrantino
    • 2008 June 1, Vincent M. Mallozzi, “Course Requirements: Good Nose and a Taste for Wine”, New York Times:
      On Tuesday, he learned even more. Ms. Frederick, who owns a wine consulting business in Manhattan but is better known among the Sommelier Society for her vintage lectures, gave the class a list of what she believed were the five best wine-making grapes in all of Italy: nebbiolo, sangiovese, sagrantino, aglianico and corvina.
      add
  59. saltbush
    • 2008 June 1, Joshua Hammer, “Travel”, New York Times:
      Poking through them “are skeletons of saltbush, quivering in the wind.
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  60. stockpiler
    • 2008 June 1, “Cluster Bombs, Made in America”, New York Times:
      No one has more invested in cluster munitions than the United States, which Human Rights Watch says has been the largest producer, stockpiler and user, using them in the former Yugoslavia, Afghanistan and Iraq.
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  61. superlawyer
    • 2008 June 1, Jill Abramson, “A Nod to the Insiders”, New York Times:
      The likely presidential nominees “know they better find someone who knows the local travel customs,” says Evan Thomas, co-author of the book “The Wise Men,” and author of “The Man to See,” a biography of Edward Bennett Williams, the superlawyer who advised many Democratic politicians.
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  62. superstupor
  63. tailcoated
    • 2008 June 1, Nicholson Baker, “Sex and the City (Circa 1840)”, New York Times:
      Accompanying the article was a drawing: a chambermaid gripped the long wooden handle of a warming pan that projected rudely from between a tailcoated gentleman’s legs.
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  64. tightroped
    • 2008 June 1, Robert Sullivan, “Taming the Falls”, New York Times:
      Blondin tightroped in shackles, which confused Strand at first.
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  65. transplanetary
    • 2008 June 1, Rob Walker, “Water Proof”, New York Times:
      Reid Lifset, the editor of Yale’s Journal of Industrial Ecology, says that bottle bills are a good idea but doesn’t swallow Fiji’s advocacy or other green measures as justifying the practice of transplanetary water shipments.
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  66. unpalatability
    • 2008 June 1, Mary Roach, “Beyond Harry & David”, New York Times:
      Having bred fruits to the pinnacle of sweet, plump perfection, we then proceeded to breed them back into unpalatability.
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  67. unpartnered
    • 2008 June 1, Liesl Schillinger, “Romance Languages”, New York Times:
      The novelist Anita Brookner , a shrewder handicapper of the luck of unpartnered women, tested that proposition in her Booker Prize -winning 1984 novel “Hotel du Lac,” in which a bloodless man tries to bully a woman into settling for him.
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  68. wearyingly
    • 2008 June 1, “Dateline: Baghdad”, New York Times:
      It’s not so much telling as wearyingly predictable that Glanz doesn’t even attempt to address substantively Cockburn’s argument that the sectarian fragmentation of Iraq is now irreversible.
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  69. wildbacher
    • 2008 June 1, Howard G. Goldberg, “A Zippy Rosé From Austria”, New York Times:
      Made from blauer wildbacher grapes, this light, zippy aperitif smells like tea roses and tastes like caraway.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. obvi
    • 2008 June 1, William Safire, “Shovelware”, New York Times:
      “ Newstorrent (after BitTorrent, obvi, as well as ‘torrential’ in its classical sense) seems more reflective of the metastasized, peer-to-peer, electron-heavy state of the news business.”
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  2. toreo *
  3. zoledronic