User:Visviva/NYT 20080611

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← Previous (2008-06-10) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2008-06-11
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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-06-11 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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88708 tokens ‧ 65232 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8552 types ‧ 28 (~ 0.327%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-06-11[edit]

  1. aji *
    • 2008 June 11, “Off the Menu”, New York Times:
      The menu includes several Peruvian dishes, like lomo saltado, a beef stir-fry, and chicken with aji, a Peruvian chili; the elder Mr. Wan’s wife, Renee, is from Lima.
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  2. disprovable
  3. dolloped
    • 2008 June 11, Florence Fabricant, “Pumpkin Seeds Step in as Pesto”, New York Times:
      The pesto lineup — basil, mint, cilantro, tomato — works overtime in summer, being slathered on chicken or fish for the grill, dolloped into cold soup or served as a dip or hors d’oeuvre spread.
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  4. ibogaine
    • 2008 June 11, Colin Moynihan, “A Yippie Veteran Is in Jail Far From the East Village”, New York Times:
      Weberman, a fellow Yippie who helped to popularize the practice of garbology (searching through trash for journalistic clues), said Mr. Beal had told friends that he was traveling with cash because he was planning to finance a clinic. Mr. Weberman said the clinic was to study ibogaine, a derivative of an African shrub that researchers have said can be used to counter addiction.
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  5. liberalizer
    • 2008 June 11, Somini Sengupta, “India’s Fiscal Gains Offset by Rising Prices”, New York Times:
      NEW DELHI — Since a low-key economic liberalizer named Manmohan Singh became prime minister four years ago, India ’s economy has soared by nearly 9 percent a year on average and per capita income is nearly double that of a decade ago.
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  6. minibiographies
  7. mohawks
  8. nonblondes
    • 2008 June 11, Roberta Smith, “The Painter Who Adored Women”, New York Times:
      The silence turns film noir in “Little Aloha,” where the main colors are black and dark blue and one of Lichtenstein’s few nonblondes casts a come-hither look from the shadows.
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  9. nonnews
  10. overwater
  11. pestos
    • 2008 June 11, Florence Fabricant, “Pumpkin Seeds Step in as Pesto”, New York Times:
      Unlike Italian pestos, in which basil dominates, these are made almost entirely from pumpkin seeds and oil.
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  12. precool
  13. presliced
    • 2008 June 11, Melena Ryzik, “Scottish Play Gets Polish Makeover”, New York Times:
      “It would be presliced at an angle,” she said, “and, if you wanted, I would work on some system for the blood to come out.” Mr. Jarzyna nodded happily.
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  14. rollaway
    • 2008 June 11, Allen Salkin, “The Food Festival Booker, Catering to Star Chefs”, New York Times:
      A Loews staff person continued down the list, confirming arrangements for chefs like Jamie Oliver and Bobby Flay — who needed a rollaway, who needed two double beds rather than a king?
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  15. secondo *
    • 2008 June 11, Mark Bittman, “Putting Meat Back in Its Place”, New York Times:
      This is true in American frontier cooking, where salt pork and bacon were used to season beans; in Italy, where a small piece of meat is served as a secondo (rarely more than a few ounces, even in restaurants); and around the world, where bits of meat are added to stir-fries and salads, as well as bean, rice and noodle dishes.
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  16. shotmaker
    • 2008 June 11, Richard Sandomir, “When Golf’s Past, Present and Future Met in Denver”, New York Times:
      Ben Hogan was 47, a savvy shotmaker ending his career; Arnold Palmer was 30 and about to be golf’s populist king; and Jack Nicklaus was 20, a powerful amateur still at Ohio State .
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  17. tattoolike
    • 2008 June 11, Roberta Smith, “The Painter Who Adored Women”, New York Times:
      On their shiny surfaces, fake reflections and shadows — like the aggressive, tattoolike scattering of Ben-Day dots on “Head With Red Shadow” — compete with real ones.
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  18. unmedicated
    • 2008 June 11, John Eligon, “Bellevue Is Allowed to Medicate Suspect”, New York Times:
      If a person with a mental illness goes to court unmedicated, “their behavior in court can wind up becoming disruptive or bizarre or they can retreat into a silence,” said N. G. Berrill, a psychologist and the executive director of the New York Center for Neuropsychology and Forensic Behavioral Science.
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  19. verifiably
    • 2008 June 11, Steven Lee Myers, “European Leaders Back Bush on Iran”, New York Times:
      Iran’s leaders, Mr. Bush said, “can either face isolation, or they can have better relations with all of us if they verifiably suspend their enrichment program.”
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  20. vocoderlike
    • 2008 June 11, Jon Caramanica, “A Soulful Sojourn Backtracks to Voltage”, New York Times:
      On “Figured Me Out,” he ran his vocals through a vocoderlike filter that rendered them robotic, like the voice of Zapp’s singer Roger Troutman or a more recent cyborg aspirant, T-Pain.
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  21. zhou *
    • 2008 June 11, Matthew Forney, “Scorpions for Breakfast and Snails for Dinner”, New York Times:
      We did, however, send them to a Chinese nursery school that fed them a daily lunch of zhou, a rice porridge with various seasonings: pickled turnips, flakes of dough sticks, green or red beans, sesame paste, or something called hot prickly mustard tubers.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. kikuyu
    • 2008 June 11, Bill Pennington, “Immelman Isn’t Banking on Winning Grand Slam”, New York Times:
      But as uniform as the heights sound, there still will be some fortunate variations in lies — when little patches of the gnarly kikuyu grass form mats that hold the ball atop the rough in a clean lie.
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  2. saltado *
    • 2008 June 11, “Off the Menu”, New York Times:
      The menu includes several Peruvian dishes, like lomo saltado, a beef stir-fry, and chicken with aji, a Peruvian chili; the elder Mr. Wan’s wife, Renee, is from Lima.
      add
  3. sapo *
    • 2008 June 11, “Corrections: For the Record”, New York Times:
      As the article noted, the nickname, “the Getsapo Law,” is a play on the words Gestapo and sapo, which as slang means snitch.
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  4. poa