User:Visviva/NYT 20080624

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2008-06-24 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-13).

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92016 tokens ‧ 68433 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8794 types ‧ 23 (~ 0.262%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2008-06-24[edit]

  1. atypicals
  2. batsu
  3. condensational
    • 2008 June 24, Natalie Angier, “For Alien Life-Seekers, New Reason to Hope”, New York Times:
      After all, they said, life arose here relatively quickly, maybe 800 million years after Earth’s condensational birth — and then stayed unicellular for the next three billion-plus years.
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  4. cysticercosis
    • 2008 June 24, Donald G. Mcneil, “Tropical Diseases Add to Burden Among the Poor in the U.S.”, New York Times:
      The prevalent diseases include Chagas, spread by blood-sucking insects; cysticercosis , spread by tapeworm eggs in dirty drinking water; and worm diseases often spread through soil near houses where pets have not been dewormed, or in urban playgrounds.
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  5. endolithic
    • 2008 June 24, Bina Venkataraman, “Microbes Eating Away at Pieces of History”, New York Times:
      From bacteria that feed on hydrocarbons to endolithic fungi that eke out an existence within porous rock, monument-damaging microbes thrive because they survive in environments inhospitable to other flora and fauna.
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  6. eucalyptol
  7. geomicrobiologist
    • 2008 June 24, Bina Venkataraman, “Microbes Eating Away at Pieces of History”, New York Times:
      The result, says Thomas Warscheid, a geomicrobiologist based in Germany, is a daily expansion and contraction cycle that cracks the temple’s facade and its internal structure. Dr. Warscheid, who has studied Angkor Wat for more than a decade, said in an interview that these pendulum swings had broken away parts of celestial dancer sculptures on the temple walls.
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  8. geomorphologist
    • 2008 June 24, Cornelia Dean, “Follow the Silt”, New York Times:
      Meanwhile, though, “an awful lot of stream restoration, if not the vast majority of it, has no empirical basis,” said William E. Dietrich, a geomorphologist at University of California, Berkeley, who studies rivers and streams.
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  9. hypernumerate
    • 2008 June 24, Andrew Ross Sorkin, “A ‘Bonfire’ Returns as Heartburn”, New York Times:
      It was replaced, in part, by the world of private equity and hedge funds, by hypernumerate quants and bankers who think proprietary trading is more important than serving clients.
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  10. megapixeling
    • 2008 June 24, Glenn Collins, “New York Sees Big Potential in a New Wave of Chinese Tourists”, New York Times:
      Mr. Li, an air-conditioning engineer, was here on business, but he was having a look around, too — and that put him at the leading edge of a growing wave of prosperous Asian tourists who may soon enough be posing before New York City’s trophy monuments, trooping in and out of buses and megapixeling everything in sight.
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  11. picaridin
  12. pimplelike
    • 2008 June 24, Denise Grady, “From a Prominent Death, Some Painful Truths”, New York Times:
      A fatty, pimplelike lesion in a coronary artery burst, and a blood clot formed that closed the vessel and cut off circulation to part of the heart muscle.
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  13. prediabetes
    • 2008 June 24, Nicholas Bakalar, “Prognosis: Diabetes and Depression Track Each Other”, New York Times:
      Surprisingly, people with untreated diabetes or prediabetes were less likely to be depressed, but those being treated for Type 2 diabetes had more than a 50 percent increased relative risk for depression compared with those who did not have diabetes.
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  14. prehatching
    • 2008 June 24, Henry Fountain, “Calls From Crocodile Eggs Serve as Alerts”, New York Times:
      But Dr. Mathevon and Amélie L. Vergne report in the journal Current Biology that prehatching calls do indeed have those effects.
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  15. saccular
    • 2008 June 24, C. Claiborne Ray, “Nasty Noises”, New York Times:
      A. One term used in studying the phenomenon is saccular acoustical sensitivity (the saccule is a bed of sensory cells in the inner ear), but the goosebumps and extreme aversion are unexplained.
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  16. saccule
    • 2008 June 24, C. Claiborne Ray, “Nasty Noises”, New York Times:
      A. One term used in studying the phenomenon is saccular acoustical sensitivity (the saccule is a bed of sensory cells in the inner ear), but the goosebumps and extreme aversion are unexplained.
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  17. showcourt
    • 2008 June 24, Christopher Clarey, “Federer Wins Like Clockwork, but Others Face Sterner Test”, New York Times:
      No. 3 seed Novak Djokovic beat the net-rushing German Michael Berrer in four sets on Centre Court and will next face Marat Safin , the Russian star who is now a dangerous floater instead of a showcourt regular.
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  18. streamscape
    • 2008 June 24, Cornelia Dean, “Follow the Silt”, New York Times:
      In short, the streamscape was not what she thought.
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  19. sunswept
    • 2008 June 24, Jon Pareles, “A Seductive Urban Sound Hushes Carnegie Hall”, New York Times:
      Bossa nova, the quietly revolutionary Brazilian music that João Gilberto introduced 50 years ago, quickly became associated with the sunswept beaches and sweeping mountain vistas of Rio de Janeiro in songs like “Garota de Ipanema” (“The Girl From Ipanema”) and “Corcovado.”
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Sequestered[edit]