User:Visviva/NYT 20090104

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-04 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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153421 tokens ‧ 117658 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12373 types ‧ 104 (~ 0.841%) words before cleaning ‧ 79 (~ 0.638%) accepted words

2009-01-04[edit]

  1. agogo
    • 2009 January 4, Ben Ratliff, “One Young Band Among Some Older Sounds”, New York Times:
      And the body-moving charms of Brazilian rhythm are there too: the grooves speak for themselves, in a language of hand drums, agogo bells, flutes and cavaquinho guitars.
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  2. ahhs
  3. anchorless
  4. antilock
    • 2009 January 4, Christopher Jensen, “High-End Nest for Pampered Empty Nesters”, New York Times:
      All Venzas get important safety gear including antilock brakes; electronic stability control, which works to prevent skids; and brake assist, which helps to assure maximum braking in an emergency.
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  5. antiterror
    • 2009 January 4, Michael Powell, “Police Polish Image, but Concerns Persist”, New York Times:
      Kelly has unfurled new anticrime and antiterror initiatives, and visiting dignitaries salute his department as the nation’s best.
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  6. ballcap
    • 2009 January 4, Thayer Evans, “Commitment to Notre Dame Is No Joke for Top Recruits”, New York Times:
      The 6-foot-1, 203-pound Evans, who is ranked as the sixth-best wide receiver by Rivals.com , proudly wore a blue ballcap with the gold ND logo on the field after the game.
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  7. bellowers
    • 2009 January 4, Francis X. Clines, “Omg! Drunk Amok Nr 50-yd Line”, New York Times:
      Anyone who considers objecting — by daring to summon a security guard — runs the risk of facing gang retaliation, for the Alpha male bellowers rarely have the guts to stand alone.
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  8. bibliophilic
    • 2009 January 4, Jacob Heilbrunn, “The Reader”, New York Times:
      Confirmation of Hitler’s bibliophilic inclinations also appears in the form of a rare photograph of his small apartment in Munich showing “Hitler posed in a dark suit before one of his two bookcases” — a handsome piece of furniture with scalloped molding — “his arms crossed in an assertively proprietary gesture.
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  9. bittersweetness
  10. cavaquinho
    • 2009 January 4, Ben Ratliff, “One Young Band Among Some Older Sounds”, New York Times:
      And the body-moving charms of Brazilian rhythm are there too: the grooves speak for themselves, in a language of hand drums, agogo bells, flutes and cavaquinho guitars.
      add
  11. ciranda
    • 2009 January 4, Ben Ratliff, “One Young Band Among Some Older Sounds”, New York Times:
      A Filial (“the Offspring”), a young five-man band from Rio de Janeiro, has done this on “$1,99” (Verge), a joyous, sophisticated-scrappy record full of samba, ciranda, baião rhythm and tag-team rapping in English and Portuguese.
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  12. compresses
  13. cosseted
    • 2009 January 4, Jacob Heilbrunn, “The Reader”, New York Times:
      At Landsberg prison, where he was cosseted by his jailers, Hitler wrote his first book, “Mein Kampf.
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  14. counterdemonstration
    • 2009 January 4, Ray Rivera, “Times Square Rally Protests Fighting in Gaza”, New York Times:
      The protesters drowned out a small counterdemonstration of a few dozen people who gathered across Seventh Avenue from the larger crowd before also moving to the Consulate.
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  15. counterprogramming
    • 2009 January 4, Rob Walker, “Slow Pitch”, New York Times:
      “We’re not advocating drug use at all,” he continued, but merely offering an innocuous beverage to anyone who feels a little stressed out — carbonated counterprogramming, as it were, to the firmly established “energy drink” category.
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  16. counterprotest
    • 2009 January 4, Ray Rivera, “Times Square Rally Protests Fighting in Gaza”, New York Times:
      “Blame Hamas; Destroy Hamas,” read a banner carried by Buddy Macy, a 52-year-old small-business owner from New Jersey who helped organize the counterprotest.
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  17. dadlike
    • 2009 January 4, Piotr Orlov, “School-Age D.J.’s, Old-School Style”, New York Times:
      As the D.J.’s the Martinez Brothers were nodding their baseball-cap-adorned heads to their energetic house and techno set, their father, Steve Martinez, stood guard beside their booth dressed in a very dadlike argyle sweater.
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  18. decarbazine
    • 2009 January 4, Roger Martin, “Two Regattas”, New York Times:
      He tells us that Johns Hopkins is treating patients with a potent cocktail of interleukin-2, cisplatin, interferon, decarbazine and Velban that has shown promise.
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  19. didacticism
  20. drivability
    • 2009 January 4, Rex Roy, “Coal in Your Stocking? Fuel Up the Cadillac!”, New York Times:
      Challenges included the engine’s high internal temperatures, its thirstiness in low-speed operation and the need to improve drivability for operators accustomed to V-8 power.
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  21. economywide
    • 2009 January 4, Robert H. Frank, “Should Congress Put a Cap on Executive Pay?”, New York Times:
      Nor is it any wonder that Congress is considering measures to limit executive pay — not just in the financial industry, but economywide.
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  22. firmwide
    • 2009 January 4, Joe Nocera, “Risk Mismanagement”, New York Times:
      Another reason VaR is so appealing is that it can measure both individual risks — the amount of risk contained in a single trader’s portfolio, for instance — and firmwide risk, which it does by combining the VaRs of a given firm’s trading desks and coming up with a net number.
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  23. graystone
  24. groaners
    • 2009 January 4, Dave Kehr, “Big, Important Picture? Sure. But Is It Best?”, New York Times:
      This will not be news to anyone who has sat through some genuine groaners from Oscars past: pictures like Frank Lloyd ’s 1933 “Cavalcade,” Robert Z.
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  25. hofs
    • 2009 January 4, Adam B. Ellick, “In Queens: A Melting Pot, and a Closed Book”, New York Times:
      To the south are Korean spas, Korean barbecue joints and hofs, or Korean pubs.
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  26. hoofers
    • 2009 January 4, Claudia La Rocco, “Tapper’s Tale: She Had the Time-Step of Her Life”, New York Times:
      Her odyssey led her to many of the great old hoofers who had fallen into obscurity when performing opportunities dried up.
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  27. hyperintense
  28. inconsonant
    • 2009 January 4, Leah Hager Cohen, “Rough Crossing”, New York Times:
      The collision of these inconsonant facts is the spark that ignites Robin Romm’s memoir, “The Mercy Papers,” a furious blaze of a book.
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  29. intonational
    • 2009 January 4, Erik Piepenburg, “The Man Who Knows Which R’s to Roll”, New York Times:
      That involves turns of phrase, sometimes intonational patterns and vocabulary that we wouldn’t know.
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  30. kaffiyehs
  31. kampong
  32. karmically
  33. laceless
    • 2009 January 4, Eric Konigsberg, “Care for an Absinthe? Ptooey!”, New York Times:
      If absinthe were sneakers, it would be a pair of laceless Chuck Taylors designed by John Varvatos for Converse.
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  34. leeringly
    • 2009 January 4, Charles Mcgrath, “So Nixonian That His Nose Seems to Evolve”, New York Times:
      he says leeringly to Michael Sheen , who plays the British television interviewer David Frost, and the voice comes out not in Mr. Langella’s mellow baritone but in Nixon’s rumbling basso, the one that sometimes sounded like a dark parody of Jimmy Stewart.
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  35. loftlike
    • 2009 January 4, Josh Barbanel, “Someone Still Has Money”, New York Times:
      But they are still trying to sell their loftlike two-bedroom apartment just down the street at 144 West 18th Street.
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  36. maskless
    • 2009 January 4, Mike Ogle, “Red Storm Breaks Through to Top No. 7 Irish”, New York Times:
      As Burrell stepped from the podium a victor, his maskless head held a bit higher, he spread his good cheer, perhaps hoping the pleasant tidings would linger into the rest of the season.
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  37. megajerks
    • 2009 January 4, Melena Ryzik, “She’s Really Shy, but That’s a Secret”, New York Times:
      Or maybe they’ve — you’ve — had a run-in with the gum-popping, eye-rolling, demanding megajerks; the chatty, bargain-hungry Target cashier; or an irritated armchair film critic like Aunt Linda, who mispronounces Scorsese but loves “Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties.
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  38. midblock
    • 2009 January 4, Christopher Gray, “Midtown High-Rise, Flight Plans Included”, New York Times:
      Browning seems to have liked the narrow midblock formula: in 1915 he built three nearly identical apartment houses, also designed by Buchman & Fox: 42 West 72nd Street, 118 West 72nd Street and 126 West 73rd Street.
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  39. mispricing
    • 2009 January 4, Stephen Kotkin, “A Bear Saw Around the Corner”, New York Times:
      Still, he contends that mispricing opportunities are always at hand.
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  40. nepotistic
    • 2009 January 4, “Corrections”, New York Times:
      Sulloway had said that the squirrels call out the nepotistic warnings when a hawk is circling overhead.
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  41. neuroimaging
    • 2009 January 4, Stuart Elliott, “A Neuromarketer on the Frontier of Buyology”, New York Times:
      Back in high school, Ms. Yudofsky was participating in research into personality disorders at a Baylor medical laboratory at the same time a study was under way on neuroimaging and branding.
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  42. neurolinguistic
    • 2009 January 4, Erik Piepenburg, “The Man Who Knows Which R’s to Roll”, New York Times:
      More than just having an ear for impersonation, Mr. Gabis suggested, his ability to study and teach the intricacies of accents, particularly accented English, is actually a perk of neurolinguistic aptitude.
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  43. neuromarketing
    • 2009 January 4, Stuart Elliott, “A Neuromarketer on the Frontier of Buyology”, New York Times:
      For a 20-year-old junior at Yale, the new field known as neuromarketing is the stuff not of sci-fi mash-ups but a potential career.
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  44. nonallergenic
  45. noncelibate
    • 2009 January 4, “When Priests Come From Overseas”, New York Times:
      To turn to foreign priests, however pastorally skilled they may be, places the ministers one step further removed from the communities to be served and risks the ire of a Catholic laity that sociological data show is more than ready to accept women and noncelibate men as its ministers.
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  46. noncognitive
    • 2009 January 4, Christine Lagorio, “The G.R.E. vs. the GMAT”, New York Times:
      is sweetening the deal by adding a noncognitive component in July: a mentor can fill out a questionnaire on creativity, ethics, communication and other qualities, resulting in a score on something called the Personal Potential Index.
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  47. nonsighted
    • 2009 January 4, Abby Ellin, “See Me, Hear Me: A Video Game for the Blind”, New York Times:
      “Choosing music as our central game theme works perfectly since both sighted and nonsighted users are equally familiar with music,” Mr. Glinert says.
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  48. noxiously
    • 2009 January 4, Joshua Yaffa, “Forbidden Nonfruit”, New York Times:
      My sister went straight for the hard stuff, choosing noxiously sweet boxes of Cocoa Puffs or Cookie Crunch.
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  49. overexplain
    • 2009 January 4, Peter Keepnews, “A Love Supreme”, New York Times:
      And he has a tendency to overexplain some things, perhaps because he needed to have them explained to him.
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  50. overexplaining
    • 2009 January 4, Peter Keepnews, “A Love Supreme”, New York Times:
      Then again, overexplaining is better than underexplaining.
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  51. overscheduled
    • 2009 January 4, Anita J. Cicero, “The Tightrope of Managing a Law Office”, New York Times:
      On the other hand, I am notoriously (according to my husband) overscheduled and unrealistic about what I can do and accomplish within a given time.
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  52. pitchwoman
    • 2009 January 4, A. O. Scott, “A Swirling Moment to Change the World”, New York Times:
      Those televisions are all broadcasting reports that voters in Dade County, Fla., have voted to overturn a local gay-rights ordinance, giving momentum to a backlash whose most visible public face belongs to Anita Bryant, an erstwhile singer and orange-juice pitchwoman.
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  53. playwriting
    • 2009 January 4, Kate Taylor, “Doesn’t Speak Norwegian. Does Speak Ibsen.”, New York Times:
      Now, after years of studying Ibsen’s plays and teaching them to his playwriting students at the New School , Mr. Shinn is getting a chance to commune even more closely with his literary hero.
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  54. porgies
    • 2009 January 4, Pete Wells, “Orange Genius”, New York Times:
      He should know what food is, I thought early on, so I let him look at porgies and bass before I scale and gut them.
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  55. precaffeinated
    • 2009 January 4, Pete Wells, “Orange Genius”, New York Times:
      This production, which takes all the focus I can muster in my precaffeinated haze, results in about two ounces of good, strong coffee.
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  56. predigital
    • 2009 January 4, Randy Kennedy, “Photographs Worth a Double Take”, New York Times:
      Mr. Chasanoff, who stopped collecting in the 1990s, sees such images as relics of an age that has passed, the predigital age.
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  57. pseudonymously
  58. reassumed
  59. rescan
    • 2009 January 4, “On Feb. 18, Free TV Won’t Be So Free”, New York Times:
      For instance, you note: “If they want an up-to-date electronic program guide, they will need to have the box rescan the channels regularly.”
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  60. salivatory
    • 2009 January 4, Joshua Yaffa, “Forbidden Nonfruit”, New York Times:
      Sleep­overs took on the kind of salivatory anticipation that most children reserve for Halloween .
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  61. seedings
  62. selectiveness
    • 2009 January 4, Randy Kennedy, “Photographs Worth a Double Take”, New York Times:
      Joshua Chuang, the gallery’s assistant curator of photographs, said that the pictures expose not simply the slipperiness of photography but also the unconscious selectiveness of our own vision.
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  63. shadowlands
    • 2009 January 4, Ben Ratliff, “One Young Band Among Some Older Sounds”, New York Times:
      You can find a fair number of stage bootlegs if you know your way around the shadowlands of file sharing, but not nearly enough of it is available via normal commercial channels.
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  64. sherbety
    • 2009 January 4, Laura Lippman, “The Girl in the Green Raincoat”, New York Times:
      Bright patterned shirts, worn untucked, slip-on loafers in sherbety colors.
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  65. skyscraping
    • 2009 January 4, C. J. Hughes, “A Cleaner Way to Keep the City Running”, New York Times:
      Unlike some of the skyscraping versions that dot rural hillsides, small turbines supply power directly to homes without first sending it through a utility company’s lines.
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  66. socializer
    • 2009 January 4, Gregory Dicum, “The Socializr”, New York Times:
      Socializr, which combines event-planning with features like photo-sharing and friends-of-friends networking, takes up too much of his time for him to enjoy the life of a real socializer.
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  67. superclubs
    • 2009 January 4, Piotr Orlov, “School-Age D.J.’s, Old-School Style”, New York Times:
      The under-age Bronx-bred siblings — Christian, 17, and Stevie Jr., 20 — headline hedonistic superclubs in Europe, but their late-night drinks, under their dad’s watch, are Pepsi and orange Gatorade.
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  68. transdisciplinary
    • 2009 January 4, “Laurel Martin-Harris, Myles Nye”, New York Times:
      Her mother is the chairwoman of American literature and American studies at Claremont Graduate University in Claremont, Calif., where she is also the vice provost and the director of the transdisciplinary studies program.
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  69. typomaniacs
    • 2009 January 4, Jennifer Schuessler, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      Attention, typomaniacs!
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  70. unassailably
    • 2009 January 4, Thomas Vinciguerra, “Real Life With, Er, Imagination”, New York Times:
      Where else to go for those unassailably meaningful and important story lines and roles?
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  71. underexplaining
    • 2009 January 4, Peter Keepnews, “A Love Supreme”, New York Times:
      Then again, overexplaining is better than underexplaining.
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  72. unliterary
    • 2009 January 4, Peter Meehan, “Oh So ’80s”, New York Times:
      A high school kid in a decidedly unliterary North Dakota town is nicknamed after a beast from “Beowulf”?
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  73. unmetaphoric
    • 2009 January 4, Peter Meehan, “Oh So ’80s”, New York Times:
      “In Owl,” Klosterman writes, “nicknames were spawned by random, unmetaphoric events that offered no meaningful reflection on the individual.
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  74. unprettied
    • 2009 January 4, Leah Hager Cohen, “Rough Crossing”, New York Times:
      The confession is gorgeous for its admitted selfishness — which, in its candor and intimacy, is transformed into an act of generosity, a precious, unprettied gift.
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  75. unranked
  76. unsensationalized
    • 2009 January 4, Liesl Schillinger, “All American”, New York Times:
      In another new offering, “Anna,” a secret subtext exhilarates a curiously unsensationalized ménage-à-trois.
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  77. warbly
    • 2009 January 4, Melena Ryzik, “She’s Really Shy, but That’s a Secret”, New York Times:
      Though she may pop up as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi or the financial adviser Suze Orman when the show returns live next Saturday, she will most likely, at some point, put aside the impressions and take on a warbly voice and an ugly knit to play someone more everyday.
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  78. whupping
    • 2009 January 4, Joshua Robinson, “Before Basketball Came Football”, New York Times:
      You saw them put a whupping on Penn State , and they should have been playing Florida or Oklahoma.
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  79. yuzu
    • 2009 January 4, Jonathan Miles, “Here’s to Your Health”, New York Times:
      One drink, the P.S.T., includes pumpkin juice, cucumber juice, celery juice and yuzu; another, the Out of State, pairs tequila with carrot purée, sweetened by agave syrup that has been infused with kaffir lime leaf.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. aleck -> only in smart aleck