User:Visviva/NYT 20090112

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-12 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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74677 tokens ‧ 54441 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 7354 types ‧ 38 (~ 0.517%) words before cleaning ‧ 25 (~ 0.34%) accepted words

2009-01-12[edit]

  1. beatboxer
    • 2009 January 12, The New York Times, “New CDs”, New York Times:
      Traoré’s sparse arrangements are built around terse repeated lines picked on an old Gretsch electric guitar, to be joined by her own overdubbed voices, a drum kit or a subtle human beatboxer and sometimes the dry plink of the n’goni, a small West African lute.
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  2. cashectomy
    • 2009 January 12, David Carr, “Let’s Invent an iTunes for News”, New York Times:
      If print wants to perform a cashectomy on users, it should probably look to what happened with music, an industry in which people once paid handsomely for records, then tapes, then CDs, that was overtaken by the expectation that the same product should be free.
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  3. chang
    • 2009 January 12, Vivien Schweitzer, “Is That the Sound of a Distant Tombak?”, New York Times:
      “Chang-Music IV” for string quartet, an alluring work by the Uzbek composer Dmitri Yanov-Yanovsky, uses Western strings to create the sound of the chang, a Central Asian instrument similar to the Persian santur (a hammer dulcimer).
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  4. conferencegoers
    • 2009 January 12, Nate Chinen, “Acts Onstage (and on the Market) at Three Clubs”, New York Times:
      The Winter Jazzfest was established with that purpose in mind — conferencegoers attend free — which helps explain why so many musicians agree to its amiable grind each year.
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  5. exhilaratingly
    • 2009 January 12, Gia Kourlas And Roslyn Sulcas, “Dance in Review”, New York Times:
      Naharin’s work, “Blush” is set to a bewildering range of music (Chopin and Radiohead enter the mix) and features a highly physical movement style that buckles torsos and lashes limbs in exhilaratingly illogical fashion.
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  6. fetally
    • 2009 January 12, Gia Kourlas And Roslyn Sulcas, “Dance in Review”, New York Times:
      A strange game at the table involves oranges and kitchen implements flying as one or two bored housemates read or slide fetally under the table.
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  7. grotesquerie
  8. logorrheic
    • 2009 January 12, Ben Brantley, “Navigating a Forest of Experimental Theater With Bread Crumbs”, New York Times:
      Short and concentrated, “The Crumb Trail,” by the 17-year-old Irish troupe Pan Pan, exudes a cool, worldly European disaffection spiked with primal pain; the sprawling, logorrheic “Architecting,” created by the American troupe TEAM under the aegis of the National Theater of Scotland, brims with warmblooded enthusiasm and against-the-odds hope.
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  9. minicar
    • 2009 January 12, Bill Vlasic, “New Cars Arrive, Courting Few Buyers”, New York Times:
      The company also said it would add two more models to its Chevrolet lineup — a minicar and a seven-passenger crossover — in 2011.
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  10. nondocumentary
  11. overfriendliness
    • 2009 January 12, Ashley Parker, “Hollywood Clamors to Be a Part of Obama’s Big Day”, New York Times:
      “And I think part of it may have been a reaction to perceived overfriendliness of Clinton with the Hollywood crowd, and polls showing that people don’t like celebrities.
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  12. perc
    • 2009 January 12, Mireya Navarro, “It May Market Organic Alternatives, but Is Your Cleaner Really Greener?”, New York Times:
      Prolonged contact with that solvent, known as PCE or perc, has been linked in some studies to cancer and neurological troubles like vision problems, and its use is strictly regulated.
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  13. postbop
    • 2009 January 12, Nate Chinen, “Acts Onstage (and on the Market) at Three Clubs”, New York Times:
      The drummer Dafnis Prieto, leading a superbly calibrated sextet, chopped up the pulse of his native Cuba with clever feints while borrowing from postbop harmony.
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  14. postracial
    • 2009 January 12, Alessandra Stanley, “Back in Business, Tears and Thanks Included”, New York Times:
      � ( Tracy Morgan was more irreverent: while accepting the Golden Globe on behalf of “3o Rock,” he announced he was now the face of postracial America.)
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  15. remixers
    • 2009 January 12, The New York Times, “New CDs”, New York Times:
      It’s little wonder Late of the Pier has become a favorite of remixers — there’s so much sound to choose from, and so little to be faithful to.
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  16. santur
    • 2009 January 12, Vivien Schweitzer, “Is That the Sound of a Distant Tombak?”, New York Times:
      “Chang-Music IV” for string quartet, an alluring work by the Uzbek composer Dmitri Yanov-Yanovsky, uses Western strings to create the sound of the chang, a Central Asian instrument similar to the Persian santur (a hammer dulcimer).
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  17. seamlessness
    • 2009 January 12, The New York Times, “New CDs”, New York Times:
      Erol Alkan, who has stitched these myriad influences into something approximating seamlessness.
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  18. snakebitten
  19. spontaneities
    • 2009 January 12, The New York Times, “New CDs”, New York Times:
      “Blending Times” mixes serious, memorable songs with easy-come, easy-go spontaneities credited as “improvisations conceived and directed by Ravi Coltrane.
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  20. tombak
    • 2009 January 12, Vivien Schweitzer, “Is That the Sound of a Distant Tombak?”, New York Times:
      At other times, while strumming and plucking the strings, the musicians tap the wood of their instruments in rhythmic patterns that evoke the soft sound of a tombak (a goblet drum).
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  21. underfinanced
  22. unfinanced
  23. unrattled
  24. unrepeated
    • 2009 January 12, Steve Smith, “Worlds Apart: Harmonies Earthbound and Lunar”, New York Times:
      Sentimentality is the last thing that comes to mind in Schoenberg’s “Pierrot Lunaire,” a 1912 piece seemingly without precedent, and an unrepeated stylistic cul de sac.
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  25. wools
    • 2009 January 12, Mireya Navarro, “It May Market Organic Alternatives, but Is Your Cleaner Really Greener?”, New York Times:
      Spielvogel said wet cleaning also has limitations; while it is fine for cottons and fabrics worn in warm climates, he said, it can damage heavy wools or structured clothes like suit jackets.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. intravidual - used only in reference to works of Dalton Conley
    • 2009 January 12, Janet Maslin, “So Plugged in, Yet So Disconnected: Field Notes From Wired America”, New York Times:
      Beware an “of course” when a point is anything but self-evident: “The irony, of course, is that the intravidual is just as much an ‘intervidual’ ( inter meaning ‘between’), since it is the networked nature of our new, Elsewhere economy and the penetration of others into us that shatters the individual.
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