User:Visviva/NYT 20090125

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2009-01-24) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2009-01-25
  • List status: open
→ Next (2009-01-26)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-25 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ] - [ This day's: ObserverToronto Star - Herald Sun ]

159576 tokens ‧ 117177 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12410 types ‧ 93 (~ 0.749%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-01-25[edit]

  1. abstractified
    • 2009 January 25, Jennifer Schuessler, “Inside the List”, New York Times:
      Considering the animal rights movement, Grandin — who has drawn on her insights as an autistic person to design chutes that keep cattle calm before slaughter and developed a monitoring system for McDonald’s — writes: “I think people in general are becoming abstractified.
      add
  2. aggrievement
    • 2009 January 25, Maureen Dowd, “Which Governor Is Wackier?”, New York Times:
      With his usual sense of entitlement and aggrievement, Bill Clinton of Arkansas did not want Caroline Kennedy of New York to have the seat that Hillary Clinton of Illinois held.
      add
  3. antigun
    • 2009 January 25, Maureen Dowd, “Which Governor Is Wackier?”, New York Times:
      Carolyn McCarthy, who ran for Congress on an antigun platform after her husband was killed and her son wounded by a gunman on the Long Island Rail Road in 1993, said she may challenge the “N.
      add
  4. arepas
    • 2009 January 25, Kris Ensminger, “On the Cheap”, New York Times:
      The menu darts among Latin American cuisines like arepas, empanadas (a duo) and Luz’s most popular dish, a gigantic Peruvian-style rotisserie chicken.
      add
  5. cerebrations
    • 2009 January 25, Lee Siegel, “No Exit”, New York Times:
      Duncan himself, however, seems to have alpine cerebrations embedded in his very molecules.
      add
  6. circusy
  7. cleareyed
    • 2009 January 25, Roy Hoffman, “Southern Comfort”, New York Times:
      His observations on America’s caste system are cleareyed — “Drop me anywhere else in America and I’m hick on a stick” — but his interior life is less engaging than that of the novel’s most complex character, a political consultant whose moral questioning adds depth to this account of big dreams gone awry.
      add
  8. collaged
    • 2009 January 25, Randy Kennedy, “Outlaws at the Art Museum (and Not for a Heist)”, New York Times:
      A collaged poster of it had just entered the collection along with portraits by artists like Gilbert Stuart (George Washington), Norman Rockwell ( Richard Nixon ) and Elaine de Kooning (John Kennedy).
      add
  9. consciousnesses
    • 2009 January 25, Jennifer Schuessler, “Sad Men”, New York Times:
      Instead of individuals searching for authenticity, we are “intraviduals” defined by shifting personas and really cool electronics, which help us manage “the myriad data streams, impulses, desires and even consciousnesses that we experience in our heads as we navigate multiple worlds.”
      add
  10. counterpunching
    • 2009 January 25, Christopher Clarey, “Top-Seeded Jankovic Falls Without a Fight”, New York Times:
      She stands just a little over 5-foot-6, but her two-handed ground strokes off both wings, inspired by the four-time Australian Open champion Monica Seles , allow her to create sharp angles and counterpunching power.
      add
  11. crame
    • 2009 January 25, William Safire, “Cramdown”, New York Times:
      . crame them downe your throate with my sworde.”
      add
  12. cutup
    • 2009 January 25, Marilyn Stasio, “A Need for Noir”, New York Times:
      Although Dek can be a cutup, his explanation for his obsessive search for the truth — “It was about respect” — reveals the bedrock of decency that makes him a seriously good guy.
      add
  13. cyberloafing
    • 2009 January 25, Jan Hoffman, “Working Hard to Look Busy”, New York Times:
      In fact, cyberloafing — the nonwork-related use of computers by employees — often gives temporary cover to those who want to appear busy, if they can master the furrowed brow, the studious squint at the monitor (while bidding on eBay ).
      add
  14. cybersavvy
    • 2009 January 25, Pankaj Mishra, “The Bonfire of China’s Vanities”, New York Times:
      Though official repression of the memory of Tiananmen has ensured that few young Chinese know much about the struggles for democracy waged in the 1980s, cybersavvy youth of the kind we were surrounded by are still likely to take a sternly nationalistic line with a Chinese writer or intellectual criticizing the events of June 1989 to a foreigner.
      add
  15. eares
    • 2009 January 25, William Safire, “Cramdown”, New York Times:
      To cram down is “to stuff into an unwilling recipient,” much as Shakespeare earlier used the figure of speech in “The Tempest”: “You cram these words into mine eares, against the stomache of my sense.”
      add
  16. eventuated
    • 2009 January 25, “The Ones Who Came First”, New York Times:
      Each of these actors represented the dignity and leadership qualities that would, over a century, show Americans a trustworthiness that eventuated in our current election outcome.
      add
  17. exclusionism
    • 2009 January 25, Ethan Bronner, “The Bullets in My In-Box”, New York Times:
      But go anywhere else in the Middle East and Zionism stands for theft, oppression, racist exclusionism.
      add
  18. freeskier
  19. friendlessness
    • 2009 January 25, Terrence Rafferty, “Cinema’s Sisterhood of Spookiness”, New York Times:
      Even so, the facts of Jin-ju’s life as they emerge in the course of unraveling the mystery tell a terrible story of teenage friendlessness and alienation, of the fears we felt when we were young and our senses were charged.
      add
  20. fumblings
    • 2009 January 25, Sam Tanenhaus, “A Fumbled Handoff of the Torch”, New York Times:
      From the beginning her mini-campaign, with its many missteps and fumblings, seem mired in confusion.
      add
  21. garagelike
    • 2009 January 25, Kris Ensminger, “On the Cheap”, New York Times:
      The grill guys sometimes dance around the flames to the soundtrack of this garagelike restaurant.
      add
  22. gubernatorially
    • 2009 January 25, David Segal, “Don’t Name That Senator”, New York Times:
      And, as we’ve learned in Illinois and New York, elected officials provide a lot more hope for genuine democracy than their gubernatorially appointed alternatives.
      add
  23. haikus
  24. headachey
    • 2009 January 25, Bruce Weber, “Jim Horne, a Familiar Face in Ads From the 1950s, Dies at 91”, New York Times:
      Well, maybe one does: a jokey shot taken in 1953 (whose rights he signed away), showing him with a sour, headachey expression of generic woe; it has been used dozens of times, even in the last decade, in ads for aspirin, tax services, hangover remedies and other stress relievers.
      add
  25. hydralike
    • 2009 January 25, Jori Finkel, “Worlds Collide in a Single Face”, New York Times:
      In the interim he pursued one of his most adventurous series, the so-called Hercules project, exploring the persistence of fascism in its hydralike forms.
      add
  26. illiberalism
    • 2009 January 25, Timothy Garton Ash, “A Liberal Translation”, New York Times:
      As the Oxford political theorist Michael Freeden observed, if just one of the necessary components — for example, the free market — dominates, then the result can be illiberalism.
      add
  27. insurancelike
  28. liberalisms
    • 2009 January 25, Timothy Garton Ash, “A Liberal Translation”, New York Times:
      Whether some distant cousin really belongs to the extended family of liberalisms is a matter of healthy dispute.
      add
  29. lineless
    • 2009 January 25, Eric Wilson, “The Spotlight Finds Jason Wu”, New York Times:
      Wu, with close-cropped hair and a lineless face, wore a cardigan and a necktie and looked like a truant from boarding school.
      add
  30. megadeals
    • 2009 January 25, Harvey Araton, “Tear Down Stadium and Build Up the Bronx”, New York Times:
      These aren’t the first megadeals cut by politicians that do not pass the smell test, but nobody has been swindled like the Yankee Stadium community.
      add
  31. microtargeting
    • 2009 January 25, Sam Tanenhaus, “A Fumbled Handoff of the Torch”, New York Times:
      They belong more to history than to the present-day politics, with its microtargeting and focus groups, its “brand extension” and “outreach.”
      add
  32. midcoast
    • 2009 January 25, Anthony Doerr, “Snowbound”, New York Times:
      In “Water Dogs” it’s early March 1997 in midcoast Maine, and a 26-year-old college dropout named Bennie Littlefield is playing paintball in the woods.
      add
  33. minimusical
  34. misperceived
  35. multidisciplinarianism
    • 2009 January 25, Russell Shorto, “Breath of Thought”, New York Times:
      Now we perceive the limitations of those old categories and scoff; we value multidisciplinarianism and genre-bending.
      add
  36. museumgoers
    • 2009 January 25, Randy Kennedy, “Outlaws at the Art Museum (and Not for a Heist)”, New York Times:
      “It’s not the audience and the forum that they crave in the way that somebody in an earlier generation might have,” said Carlo McCormick, the New York art critic, of museumgoers and museums.
      add
  37. noncussing
    • 2009 January 25, “Who Would Jesus Smack Down?”, New York Times:
      As a late-40-something, Midwestern, unstylish, noncussing fellow evangelical Calvinist, I have a word for Driscoll: Preach it, brother.
      add
  38. nondidactically
    • 2009 January 25, Elizabeth Jensen, “Born to the Left, Aiming Her Camera Right”, New York Times:
      Her parentage has sometimes worked against her — she was repeatedly harassed at McCain events last year — but she chooses to portray her subjects as nondidactically as possible.
      add
  39. nudie
    • 2009 January 25, Ken Johnson, “The Image Is Erotic. But Is It Art?”, New York Times:
      Playboy had recently become an object of mainstream popularity, a nudie magazine with literary content that smart men and women could peruse without embarrassment.
      add
  40. paintballer
    • 2009 January 25, Anthony Doerr, “Snowbound”, New York Times:
      One of the urchin fishermen, a rookie paintballer named Ray LaBrecque, has gone missing.
      add
  41. pimpish
    • 2009 January 25, Lee Siegel, “No Exit”, New York Times:
      Holed up on an obscure island somewhere in Britain, physically broken from the torture, cared for by a young runaway in flight from her vicious, pimpish boyfriend, who also happens to be a British cop, Rose scours human existence for meaning: “It astonished him that those around him went about their business as if the world — as if being alive — was uncomplicated and unmysterious.”
      add
  42. ponied up
    • 2009 January 25, Frank Rich, “No Time for Poetry”, New York Times:
      Only then did we learn that he doled out billions in secret, last-minute bonuses to his staff last month, just before Bank of America took over and just before the government ponied up a second bailout to cover Merrill’s unexpected $15 billion fourth-quarter loss.
      add
  43. postboomer
    • 2009 January 25, Michael Winerip, “They Warned You About Us”, New York Times:
      “Boomer” has gotten such a bum rap that even our new president, who is a clear-cut boomer demographically (the boom years ran through 1964), has sought to link himself to a younger generation with a postboomer mentality, one that types with its thumbs to communicate and is not tainted by the cultural wars of the 1960s.
      add
  44. posterlike
    • 2009 January 25, Ken Johnson, “The Image Is Erotic. But Is It Art?”, New York Times:
      Thickly painted in vivid colors within sharp contour lines, statuesque women in scanty costumes appear in posterlike compositions with their names spelled out in big, graphically charged letters.
      add
  45. prerevolutionary
    • 2009 January 25, Martin Walker, “Paper Trail”, New York Times:
      Russia is not going back to the Terror of the 1930s or to the gulag, but to a softer and greedier form of power that has echoes of Leonid Brezhnev’s years and of prerevolutionary czarism.
      add
  46. preselling
    • 2009 January 25, Brooks Barnes, “Suddenly, Hollywood Seems a Conservative Investment”, New York Times:
      It manages risk to investors through a variety of routes: preselling its films to foreign distributors, casting commercially tested actors, taking advantage of state tax incentives for filming.
      add
  47. psychopharmacological
    • 2009 January 25, Vanessa Grigoriadis, “Checking In”, New York Times:
      As a compromise in an age of psychopharmacological doubt, this seems about right.
      add
  48. pummeler
    • 2009 January 25, Sarah Lyall, “Is That You, Sherlock?”, New York Times:
      But he will do those things while being a man of action, a chaser, shooter and pummeler of criminals — “like James Bond in 1891,” Joel Silver , one of the film’s producers, said last fall.
      add
  49. regionalist
    • 2009 January 25, Dennis Lim, “Examining Race and a Future Beyond It”, New York Times:
      Jenkins joins the ranks of regionalist indie directors whose movies are anchored in a powerful sense of place.
      add
  50. ruminator
    • 2009 January 25, Maria Russo, “Unhappy Together”, New York Times:
      The narrator is a reader and ruminator, a provocateur.
      add
  51. scorekeeping
    • 2009 January 25, Sam Tanenhaus, “A Fumbled Handoff of the Torch”, New York Times:
      And in scorekeeping terms the Republican Bushes have set a new standard for monopolizing high office — their string of victories now includes three presidential terms, two vice-presidential ones and a pair of governorships in two politically important states (Florida and Texas).
      add
  52. sexlessly
    • 2009 January 25, Sarah Lyall, “Is That You, Sherlock?”, New York Times:
      That Holmes occasionally wielded guns, leapt out of carriages and rushed through the fog with Errol Flynnesque panache, but mostly he was a giant brain inside a tweed suit, sexlessly debonair in the way Hollywood liked its leading men in the 1930s and 1940s.
      add
  53. slopestyle
    • 2009 January 25, The Associated Press, “Snowboard Gold for Holland at X Games”, New York Times:
      Snowboarder Shaun White did not let the heavy, wet snow slow him down in the slopestyle competition, winning his record eighth Winter X gold medal.
      add
  54. snarge
  55. stomache
    • 2009 January 25, William Safire, “Cramdown”, New York Times:
      To cram down is “to stuff into an unwilling recipient,” much as Shakespeare earlier used the figure of speech in “The Tempest”: “You cram these words into mine eares, against the stomache of my sense.”
      add
  56. streamable
    • 2009 January 25, Virginia Heffernan, “Confessions of a TED Addict”, New York Times:
      Together, they made the TED talks streamable on the Web in 2006.
      add
  57. sworde
    • 2009 January 25, William Safire, “Cramdown”, New York Times:
      This year’s proposed legislation would allow bankruptcy judges to modify mortgage loans for homeowners facing foreclosure, in effect imposing the revision on the less-than-popular lenders, much as Chaworth said in 1668, though only with the force of law and not with a sworde.
      add
  58. tendu
    • 2009 January 25, Toni Bentley, “Appraising Grace”, New York Times:
      If you can wade through Volynsky’s sometimes dense but always hugely entertaining and surprising text, you will never look at a toeshoe, a tiara or a tendu, not to mention an entire ballerina sporting all of the above, in the same way again.
      add
  59. throate
    • 2009 January 25, William Safire, “Cramdown”, New York Times:
      . crame them downe your throate with my sworde.”
      add
  60. toeshoe
    • 2009 January 25, Toni Bentley, “Appraising Grace”, New York Times:
      If you can wade through Volynsky’s sometimes dense but always hugely entertaining and surprising text, you will never look at a toeshoe, a tiara or a tendu, not to mention an entire ballerina sporting all of the above, in the same way again.
      add
  61. transhistorical
    • 2009 January 25, Virginia Heffernan, “Confessions of a TED Addict”, New York Times:
      The corridor from Silicon Alley to Valley seems to crackle, and a new in-crowd emerges: the one that loves Linux, organic produce, behavioral economics, transhistorical theories and “An Inconvenient Truth.”
      add
  62. trichloroethylene
    • 2009 January 25, Felicity Barringer, “Exposed to Solvent, Worker Faces Hurdles”, New York Times:
      Abney, now sidelined by Parkinson’s, had spent more than two decades up to his elbows in a drum of the solvent, trichloroethylene, while he cleaned metal piping at a now-shuttered Dresser Industries plant here.
      add
  63. trunkload
    • 2009 January 25, Azadeh Moaveni, “Wine-Order Bride”, New York Times:
      But Joseph’s mobile phone seemed permanently off, and we soon learned that he had been caught by the police with a trunkload of whiskey.
      add
  64. tuuq
    • 2009 January 25, Timothy Egan, “Coming of Age in Alaska”, New York Times:
      ݉ was there, after all, before Gore-Tex replaced muskrat and wolf skin in parkas, before moon boots replaced mukluks, before the gas drill replaced the age-old tuuq we used to dig through five feet of ice to fish.”
      add
  65. unbusy
    • 2009 January 25, Jan Hoffman, “Working Hard to Look Busy”, New York Times:
      In these unbusy times, busywork’s bad reputation may be due for revision.
      add
  66. uncelebrated
    • 2009 January 25, Saki Knafo, “Since the ’60s, a Place on the Ramparts”, New York Times:
      W HEN a former community organizer named Barack Obama began his bid for the presidency, it cast a spotlight on an uncelebrated profession.
      add
  67. understanders
    • 2009 January 25, Virginia Heffernan, “Confessions of a TED Addict”, New York Times:
      These are the people of the brain, after all, the understanders.
      add
  68. unilateralist
  69. unknow
    • 2009 January 25, Vanessa Grigoriadis, “Checking In”, New York Times:
      ݊ust unknow.
      add
  70. unwearables
    • 2009 January 25, Randy Cohen, “Truth in Suspension”, New York Times:
      He’s compensating you for an injury, not for purchasing your spattered unwearables.
      add
  71. urchiners
    • 2009 January 25, Anthony Doerr, “Snowbound”, New York Times:
      Two of the urchiners creep through the snow toward Bennie, guns drawn.
      add
  72. verrry
    • 2009 January 25, Jan Hoffman, “Working Hard to Look Busy”, New York Times:
      But now, when business is verrry slow and the possibility of layoffs icily real, looking busy is no joke.
      add
  73. woundingly
    • 2009 January 25, Celia Mcgee, “Approaching Brecht, by Way of Africa”, New York Times:
      But when the playwright Lynn Nottage spoke the first two words of the title to Congolese women in the refugee camps of Uganda in 2004, she said, they repeated them in such a way that the words became woundingly new.
      add
  74. yearbookish
    • 2009 January 25, Ken Johnson, “The Image Is Erotic. But Is It Art?”, New York Times:
      In the early ’90s Lisa Yuskavage’s erotic fantasy pictures of nubile half-naked young women made their debut, and not long after that John Currin moved from painting yearbookish images of anonymous girls to painting outrageously goofy pictures of women with ridiculously oversize breasts.
      add
  75. zeppole
    • 2009 January 25, Jeff Vandam, “Brio Inside the Brownstones”, New York Times:
      These days it might be easier to pick up a Wi-Fi signal than a rice ball or some zeppole, but what’s nice is that the zeppole are still here: the neighborhood’s old guard has remained reassuringly in place.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. bourguignon
    • 2009 January 25, Randy Cohen, “Truth in Suspension”, New York Times:
      The refund option implies no criticism of any new chef, just acknowledges that a yearning for beef bourguignon may not be satisfied by tekka maki.
      add
  2. bowie
    • 2009 January 25, Sarah Lyall, “Is That You, Sherlock?”, New York Times:
      He keeps his bills pinned to the wall with a bowie knife.
      add
  3. littleleaf
    • 2009 January 25, Gregory Beyer, “As No. 44 Arrives, a Park for No. 32?”, New York Times:
      The project will eventually comprise 150 littleleaf linden trees arranged in two rows flanking a sloped lawn, culminating in a three-sided granite structure housing a bust of Roosevelt, and engraved with his Four Freedoms, as articulated in a 1941 speech.
      add