User:Visviva/NYT 20090208

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-02-08 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-08).

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161174 tokens ‧ 120556 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12791 types ‧ 64 (~ 0.5%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-02-08[edit]

  1. antinarcotics
    • 2009 February 8, Jodi Kantor, “Back on World Stage, a Larger-Than-Life Holbrooke”, New York Times:
      On Monday, Mr. Holbrooke begins a 10-day tour of the region, where he will try to vacuum up as much information as possible, he said, visiting high-level officials and local ones, women who serve in the Afghan National Assembly, military bases, nongovernmental organizations, antinarcotics programs, refugee camps and the perilous tribal region.
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  2. arrearages
  3. buckraking
    • 2009 February 8, Frank Rich, “Slumdogs Unite!”, New York Times:
      To his credit, Geithner, like Obama, has devoted his career to public service, not buckraking.
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  4. cevapi
  5. clutchless
    • 2009 February 8, Richard S. Chang, “Of Maxwell, Uma and Omar the Car”, New York Times:
      “I don’t use park,” she said, referring to the gearbox, an odd clutchless manual that VW called the Automatic Stick Shift.
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  6. cumbias
    • 2009 February 8, Jon Caramanica, “Voices Newly Amplified by Grammy Nominations”, New York Times:
      The frontman Pancho sings this group’s cumbias with a whimsical edge, and the music, while deliberately ragtag in sound, is never less than sharp, driven by the sprightly, deft tuba player Chalomo (especially the dizzying “Cuando Anduve Como Perro”).
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  7. delectables
  8. delegitimized
    • 2009 February 8, Thomas L. Friedman, “Beyond the Banks”, New York Times:
      “Otherwise, they are seen as a tool to promote the occupation and will be delegitimized and attacked.”
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  9. ecoconscious
    • 2009 February 8, Peggy Orenstein, “The Toxic Paradox”, New York Times:
      There is nothing like the suggestion of a cancer riskto freak out a parent, especially one of the hypereducated, ecoconscious ilk.
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  10. everymen
    • 2009 February 8, Tom Perrotta, “Kate Winslet”, New York Times:
      Everything they do, on-screen and off, cements their reputations as likable everymen, latter-day Jimmy Stewarts.
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  11. exonerations
  12. grapplings
    • 2009 February 8, Erica Jong, “An Adventurous Woman”, New York Times:
      Her grapplings are impressive: “My own belief — that we, on our short-lived planet, are part of a universe simultaneously .
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  13. greenmarkets
    • 2009 February 8, Gregory Beyer, “Amid the Kale and Broccoli, a Familiar Face Is Missing”, New York Times:
      “A lot of managers just seem to think they have some cool job and they are there to be our friends and to hang out,” said Kira Kinney, a farmer from New Paltz, N.Y., who has sold her organic produce at many of the city’s greenmarkets.
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  14. hyperarticulate
    • 2009 February 8, Steven Greenhouse, “Two Unions in Marriage Now Face Divorce Talks”, New York Times:
      The fight is led by two hyperarticulate heavyweights, both Ivy League graduates, each using his decades of experience in battling corporations to clobber the other.
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  15. hypereducated
    • 2009 February 8, Peggy Orenstein, “The Toxic Paradox”, New York Times:
      There is nothing like the suggestion of a cancer riskto freak out a parent, especially one of the hypereducated, ecoconscious ilk.
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  16. innovatively
  17. kerflooey
    • 2009 February 8, David Segal, “What’s Your New Plan B?”, New York Times:
      Until our economy went kerflooey, it was a whimsical reverie about the life that you could swap for the one that you were leading.
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  18. knowingness
    • 2009 February 8, Liesl Schillinger, “Our Star-Crossed Paths”, New York Times:
      Despite the mist of melancholy that floats amid this photographic record, there is also humor, caprice, knowingness and the implicit suggestion that changing feelings and fading possessions can’t rob a true romance of the value it had at its height.
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  19. kvell
    • 2009 February 8, Uzi Silber, “Smiling Jack”, New York Times:
      Sitting on our hands nervously, we look on jealously as other couples kvell over their cooing infants.
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  20. lostness
    • 2009 February 8, Adam Kirsch, “Intimate Betrayals”, New York Times:
      When a stranger comes to their door asking for someone named Shauntrelle, it’s like a demonstration of their lostness.
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  21. methenolone
    • 2009 February 8, Michael S. Schmidt, “Rodriguez Said to Test Positive in 2003”, New York Times:
      SI.com said that Rodriguez had tested positive for the anabolic steroid Primobolan, whose chemical name is methenolone.
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  22. midengine
    • 2009 February 8, Rob Sass, “Seeds That Grew Into Porsche Legacy”, New York Times:
      Two projects developed more or less concurrently: a midengine tube-chassis roadster that became 356 No. 1, regarded as the first Porsche automobile, and the 356/2, a unit-body rear-engine design.
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  23. mikva
    • 2009 February 8, Uzi Silber, “Smiling Jack”, New York Times:
      We zip past the Beaux-Arts mikva, or Jewish ritual bath, and onto the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, bound for Midwood, Brooklyn.
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  24. multifeatured
    • 2009 February 8, Josh Barbanel, “For Bob Vila, Move-In Condition”, New York Times:
      While the allure of multifeatured new condominiums, with their full-service gyms and children’s playrooms, may be fading in the deepening recession, Mr. Vila and his wife, Diana Barrett, chose a place with a “dream kitchen” with “rich ebonized cabinetry” and a two-zone wine cooler, according to the building’s promotional material.
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  25. nonactors
  26. nonbeing
    • 2009 February 8, Erica Jong, “An Adventurous Woman”, New York Times:
      The difference between being and nonbeing is both so abrupt and so vast that it remains shocking even though it happens to every living thing that is, was or ever will be.
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  27. nondoorman
    • 2009 February 8, Joyce Cohen, “The Dog and the Doorbell Test”, New York Times:
      All were one-bedrooms in nondoorman midrise co-op buildings. Ms. Karagosian preferred that to a studio in a doorman building, where “you are obligated to say hi, and sometimes you are not in the mood,” she said.
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  28. nonregular
    • 2009 February 8, Martin Fackler, “In Japan, New Jobless May Lack Safety Net”, New York Times:
      The overwhelming majority — some 125,000, the ministry says — are so-called nonregular workers, who are sent by staffing agencies or hired on short-term contracts with lower pay, fewer benefits and none of the legal protections against layoffs of regular full-time employees.
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  29. nudger
  30. oversings
    • 2009 February 8, Jon Caramanica, “Voices Newly Amplified by Grammy Nominations”, New York Times:
      Though his songs are hugely ambitious — the majestic bombast of “Llueve Por Dentro,” or the blithe, sinuous dance-pop of “La Mentira” — Mr. Fonsi never oversings them, an impressive demonstration of restraint.
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  31. policiers *
    • 2009 February 8, Marilyn Stasio, “The Sacred and the Profane”, New York Times:
      These are the kinds of questions posed by J. Robert Janes, in a brilliant series of policiers set in Vichy France during the German occupation, and now taken up by Matt Beynon Rees, a former Jerusalem bureau chief for Time magazine, in his provocative mysteries set in the Palestinian territories of today.
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  32. postfeminists
    • 2009 February 8, “What Do Women Want?”, New York Times:
      But to call a group of researchers postfeminist without exploring what exactly that means belittles both feminists and postfeminists alike.
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  33. predecided
    • 2009 February 8, Helene Cooper, “Biden Signals U.S. Is Open to Deal With Russia on Missiles”, New York Times:
      Konstantin Kosachev, chairman of the international affairs committee in the Duma, the lower house of Parliament, said in an interview that he welcomed Mr. Biden’s comments about “a need to listen to partners,” which Mr. Kosachev contrasted with Mr. Bush’s approach “that everything is already predecided, everything is clear and should be done the way the American administration thinks about it.”
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  34. princelike
    • 2009 February 8, Charles Isherwood, “Human Behavior in All Its Messy Glory”, New York Times:
      A possible savior splashes down in her life in the form of Nick Lockridge (Kieran Campion), who emerges from a lake dripping water and princelike promise.
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  35. pyrotechnical
    • 2009 February 8, Jodi Kantor, “Back on World Stage, a Larger-Than-Life Holbrooke”, New York Times:
      But no one yet knows how his often pyrotechnical style — he whispers, but also pesters, bluffs, threatens, stages fits and publicizes — will work in an administration that prizes low-key competence or in a region that is dangerously unstable.
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  36. quattro *
    • 2009 February 8, Lawrence Ulrich, “A Class Act Matures in Size and Price”, New York Times:
      I spent a week with each of two A4 models, a turbocharged 2-liter 4-cylinder with optional quattro all-wheel-drive, and a 3.2-liter V-6 that had quattro as standard equipment.
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  37. reliquefying
    • 2009 February 8, Ben Stein, “From Bad to Worse, but Far From the Worst”, New York Times:
      We have to get money into the banks by buying their assets, taking them off the books and reliquefying the banks and other lending institutions.
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  38. rugaeform
    • 2009 February 8, Erica Wagner, “Doctors and Sons”, New York Times:
      And then she was thinking of . . . rugaeform folds, of the median raphe that separated one bollock from the other, of the dartos muscle, the cells of Sertoli.”
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  39. semiattached
    • 2009 February 8, Marcelle S. Fischler, “Hidden Away Next to Everything”, New York Times:
      A tidy New England -style enclave of 1,173 people on the cusp of Queens , the village is just a few blocks but a less congested world away from their semiattached house in Bellerose Terrace, a more middle-class unincorporated hamlet, also in Hempstead.
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  40. semifictional
    • 2009 February 8, Rachel Donadio, “Living Where Crime Conquers All”, New York Times:
      The film is based on the recent Italian book of the same title, Roberto Saviano’s powerful semifictional account of the Camorra, the bloody clans of the Campania region surrounding Naples; Mr. Saviano wrote the screenplay with Mr. Garrone and others.
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  41. shimete
    • 2009 February 8, Philip Galanes, “Tall Tales in Makeup”, New York Times:
      Or if this habit really grates, tell him basta, arrêtez or shimete yo!
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  42. songcraft
    • 2009 February 8, Jon Caramanica, “Voices Newly Amplified by Grammy Nominations”, New York Times:
      Brandon Heath has a gentle and breathy voice, an abiding sense of optimism, and songcraft any number of VH1 staples would gladly convert for.
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  43. speechwriting
    • 2009 February 8, Elsa Dixler, “Paperback Row”, New York Times:
      The process of White House speechwriting has become much more complex since the era of Franklin Roosevelt , Schlesinger shows in this lively history, although the best ghostwriters are still so in tune with the boss that they sound and think like him.
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  44. staircaselike
    • 2009 February 8, Lori Gottlieb, “A Love Life Less Ordinary”, New York Times:
      Like a man partial to a particular breast size, Jacob also has his ideal foot shape: a high arch, a wide instep and a staircaselike progression of toes.
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  45. strawlike
    • 2009 February 8, Uzi Silber, “Smiling Jack”, New York Times:
      With little choice, syringes and intravenous lines are run through a strawlike tube implanted in his skull.
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  46. traditionals
    • 2009 February 8, Jon Caramanica, “Voices Newly Amplified by Grammy Nominations”, New York Times:
      While Mr. Watson, from Lafayette, La., has played with the well-regarded revivalists the Pine Leaf Boys (also nominated in this category), he’s more thrilling on his own, and the most radical moments here are “J’ai Été Tout Autour du Pays” and “La Valse de Grand Basile,” nimble rearranged versions of two traditionals.
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  47. tripleheader
    • 2009 February 8, John Harney, “‘You May Now Kiss the Bride...Next’”, New York Times:
      Rabbi Feller, who performs 80 to 100 each year, remembers a June 2007 tripleheader when she officiated at morning and early afternoon ceremonies on the East Side, followed by another at the Central Park Boathouse.
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  48. unhypocritically
    • 2009 February 8, Randy Cohen, “Dutch Treat?”, New York Times:
      You can unhypocritically urge your children to heed a single standard: Obey the law.
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  49. unrented
    • 2009 February 8, Dan Bilefsky, “War’s Lingering Scars Slow Bosnia’s Economic Growth”, New York Times:
      That followed panicked hoarding in October, when tens of thousands of people lined up at banks and demanded their deposits; such was the frenzy to store cash that people in Sarajevo struggled to find unrented vaults and safes.
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  50. vanload
    • 2009 February 8, Kate Zernike, “And Baby Makes How Many?”, New York Times:
      But as families have shrunk, and parents helicopter over broods tinier yet more precious, a vanload of children has taken on more of a freak show factor.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. dartos
    • 2009 February 8, Erica Wagner, “Doctors and Sons”, New York Times:
      . rugaeform folds, of the median raphe that separated one bollock from the other, of the dartos muscle, the cells of Sertoli.”
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  2. spiriting
    • 2009 February 8, Dave Kehr, “Buñuel at His Wildest, in Circulation Again”, New York Times:
      God does not make an appearance, but the Devil (Ms. Pinal) emphatically does: first in the guise of a schoolgirl who tries to lure Simon down with the sight of her shapely legs; then as a bearded but blatantly female Jesus carrying a lamb; and finally as a stylishly coiffed woman who succeeds in spiriting Simon off, by means of a jet, to a Manhattan discotheque — Buñuel’s persuasive idea of hell.
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