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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-02-15 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-15).

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152747 tokens ‧ 112900 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12061 types ‧ 77 (~ 0.638%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-02-15[edit]

  1. aestheticized
    • 2009 February 15, Holland Cotter, “The Boom Is Over. Long Live the Art!”, New York Times:
      For a while we heard a lot about the radicalism of Beauty; lately about the subversive politics of aestheticized Ambiguity.
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  2. agapanthus
    • 2009 February 15, Dominique Browning, “Plant Love”, New York Times:
      We must begin with the chapter called “Agapanthus”: “To consummate an affair with agapanthus, we fear you must resort to shoving and hauling, smashing and splintering, to a cold bedroom full of nasty, yellowing foliage, always anticipating the pure bliss that will come.
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  3. anticrisis
    • 2009 February 15, Jeff Z. Klein And Stu Hackel, “K.H.L. Leader Chides N.H.L. On 2014 Games”, New York Times:
      We put together a comprehensive anticrisis plan that includes salary cap regulations and the temporary elimination of unrestricted free agency, but all that is subject to agreement by the players association.
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  4. antlike
    • 2009 February 15, Guy Trebay, “The Last Collection”, New York Times:
      Cataloging was in progress when I arrived, and so the gloom of that particular day was offset by the bright antlike industry of workers scribbling descriptions, hauling a Léger off the wall to be photographed and gliding about wearing surgical booties and white cotton gloves.
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  5. bangus
    • 2009 February 15, Mark Foggin, “Fast Food for the Filipino Soul”, New York Times:
      Its fare is a mix of fast-food staples like burgers and Chickenjoy, along with more regional dishes like smoked bangus, or milkfish — a national symbol of the Philippines — served with vinegar and pepper.
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  6. booping
    • 2009 February 15, Jon Pareles, “One-Man Bands, and One Woman on Triangle”, New York Times:
      Chirpy pop choruses punctuate raps, and the beat stays brisk and unpredictable; one track is built around booping touch tones and dial tones.
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  7. budgeteers
    • 2009 February 15, William Safire, “Rifacimento”, New York Times:
      Repurposing has become hot, and not only among drug manufacturers and federal budgeteers.
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  8. claustrophobically
    • 2009 February 15, Jon Pareles, “One-Man Bands, and One Woman on Triangle”, New York Times:
      Loney Dear, the one-man studio band of the Swedish songwriter Emil Svanangen, sounds frantically, claustrophobically forlorn on its fifth album, “Dear John” (Polyvinyl).
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  9. coatdress
    • 2009 February 15, Elaine Sciolino, “Demure Diplomacy”, New York Times:
      The image of a demure wife in a gray midcalf coatdress and matching pillbox hat curtsying before the Queen of England replaced that of the sex-crazed foreigner with nude photos on the Internet and Mick Jagger and Eric Clapton in her past.
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  10. cochin
    • 2009 February 15, Dominique Browning, “Plant Love”, New York Times:
      Ԡorchids, hyancinths, azaleas, a weeping willow and a collection of chickens, including a cochin hen named Emma, whose nest box was tucked in the corner of the kitchen, though she had full run of the apartment.
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  11. corporatewide
    • 2009 February 15, John Markoff, “Do We Need a New Internet?”, New York Times:
      Despite a thriving global computer security industry that is projected to reach $79 billion in revenues next year, and the fact that in 2002 Microsoft itself began an intense corporatewide effort to improve the security of its software, Internet security has continued to deteriorate globally.
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  12. corsetlike
    • 2009 February 15, Ruth La Ferla, “Miami Beach Feels the Heat”, New York Times:
      At the new Louis Bar, where tufted settees and pink menus with corsetlike lacing suggest a scene from “Venus in Furs,” Adriana Leone, a dentist with a practice on Wall Street, said, “I came because the place is new, but mostly because I needed to get away from the depressing economy that is New York City right now.”
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  13. cyberdefenses
    • 2009 February 15, John Markoff, “Do We Need a New Internet?”, New York Times:
      That was driven home late last year, when a malicious software program thought to have been unleashed by a criminal gang in Eastern Europe suddenly appeared after easily sidestepping the world’s best cyberdefenses.
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  14. deindustrialize
    • 2009 February 15, “Labor’s Child”, New York Times:
      But the sad truth is that the previous Labor government had prepared the way for her by going all out to deindustrialize Britain, shut the coal mines, bureaucratize the National Health and starve public transport.
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  15. diffuser *
    • 2009 February 15, Anne Eisenberg, “Bringing Wind Turbines to Ordinary Rooftops”, New York Times:
      “The air is steered toward the diffuser ring and dispersed, rather than leaving the blades with a ripping noise,” Dr. Anderson said.
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  16. flukiness
    • 2009 February 15, Rob Walker, “A Successful Failure”, New York Times:
      As with many Web-popularity stories, there’s a lot of flukiness to Fail Whale’s rise.
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  17. gloppier
    • 2009 February 15, Patricia Leigh Brown, “The Little Gold Man in a New Blue World”, New York Times:
      “It’s interesting how his clean midcentury aesthetic has held up better than the gloppier shows, the baubles, bangles and beads,” Mr. Condon said.
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  18. hamantaschen
    • 2009 February 15, Sue Halpern, “Permanent Ellipses”, New York Times:
      In a book where a man’s mental disarray is the text, anything that seems carelessly out of place — a dessert of hamantaschen, for example, typically served on the Jewish holiday of Purim, made by Sara on Hanukkah — is jarring.
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  19. housecleaners
  20. hybridlike
    • 2009 February 15, Jerry Garrett, “A New Hybrid Sprouts in the Shadow of the Prius”, New York Times:
      Those numbers don’t seem particularly hybridlike — the gasoline-driven Smart Fortwo is rated 33/41 — especially for a car whose namesake, the 2000-6 Insight, was renowned for an economy rating that briefly touched 70 m.p.g.
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  21. hypermilers
    • 2009 February 15, Jerry Garrett, “Pulsing and Gliding to 65 M.P.G.”, New York Times:
      This herky-jerky driving style is, according to Wayne Gerdes, a Chicago-based fuel economy expert, a variation of what hypermilers call the “high-speed pulse and glide.”
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  22. interpretively
    • 2009 February 15, Tom Leclair, “Asylum Seeker”, New York Times:
      I say “probably” because his narration is factually, interpretively and maybe intentionally unreliable, a self-defense document like “Lolita,” but without Humbert Humbert’s admitted homicide and “fancy prose style.”
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  23. levelest
  24. lightheadedly
    • 2009 February 15, Jon Pareles, “One-Man Bands, and One Woman on Triangle”, New York Times:
      The album is so lightheadedly inclusive that when George Clinton rasps, “There’s a party and you’re all invited,” it’s easy to believe.
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  25. menschier
    • 2009 February 15, Philip Galanes, “Piggy Bank for Mom and Dad”, New York Times:
      And although menschier folk would have offered to pay for the damage, you’re lucky these boys didn’t burn down your house.
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  26. midcalf
    • 2009 February 15, Elaine Sciolino, “Demure Diplomacy”, New York Times:
      The image of a demure wife in a gray midcalf coatdress and matching pillbox hat curtsying before the Queen of England replaced that of the sex-crazed foreigner with nude photos on the Internet and Mick Jagger and Eric Clapton in her past.
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  27. milkfish
    • 2009 February 15, Mark Foggin, “Fast Food for the Filipino Soul”, New York Times:
      Its fare is a mix of fast-food staples like burgers and Chickenjoy, along with more regional dishes like smoked bangus, or milkfish — a national symbol of the Philippines — served with vinegar and pepper.
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  28. misdialed
    • 2009 February 15, Habiba Nosheen, “Uh-Oh, Calcutta”, New York Times:
      Nationwide, 240 million calls are placed to 911 every year, and up to 10 percent of them are misdialed, according to Patrick Halley, a spokesman for the National Emergency Number Association, a trade organization.
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  29. misdialing
    • 2009 February 15, Habiba Nosheen, “Uh-Oh, Calcutta”, New York Times:
      As for Mr. Vashishta, he laughed in embarrassment as he recalled misdialing 911 not once but twice in a weekend.
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  30. misdialings
    • 2009 February 15, Habiba Nosheen, “Uh-Oh, Calcutta”, New York Times:
      Although neither Mr. Halley nor the New York New YorkPolice Department could provide statistics on how many misdialings in the city were attempts to call numbers in India, many local Indians, especially newly arrived immigrants, acknowledge that the misdialings are a common problem.
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  31. multibillions
    • 2009 February 15, “More Annals of Global Greed Inc.”, New York Times:
      There may be some taxpayer comfort in the fact that this scandal was rooted in Nigeria, not Iraq, where the Halliburton megacorporation (you know, the one Dick Cheney ran before he became vice president) reaped multibillions as the Bush administration’s most favored no-bid contractor.
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  32. mutawa
  33. nightclubby
    • 2009 February 15, Patricia Leigh Brown, “The Little Gold Man in a New Blue World”, New York Times:
      Along with the executive producer Bill Condon (director of “Dreamgirls” ) and the veteran producer Laurence Mark, Mr. Rockwell — the first architect to design the show — is turning back the clock, Benjamin Button-style, to recapture the show’s nightclubby, Champagne-popping, convivial, communal roots.
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  34. nonbombastic
    • 2009 February 15, Simon Romero, “Chávez Says He’d Talk With Obama ‘Any Day’”, New York Times:
      The Obama administration seems to have adopted a nonbombastic approach to dealing with Venezuela, even as it was faced with questions over a referendum campaign here which had been marked by attacks by pro-Chávez partisans on institutions viewed as critical of Mr. Chávez, like the Israeli Embassy and the Vatican ’s diplomatic mission, and threats against prominent opponents of the president.
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  35. nongraphic
    • 2009 February 15, Jim Krusoe, “Fringe Dwellers”, New York Times:
      Possibly more to the point regarding comics, Millar’s book comes about as close to a nongraphic graphic novel as anything I can imagine — a plus for a person like me who is not a particular fan of graphic novels.
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  36. nonrandomness
    • 2009 February 15, “Darwin in Full”, New York Times:
      This inadequate and potentially misleading characterization of Darwinian evolution fails to recognize the centrality of nonrandomness and (in at least one pertinent sense) “nonblindness” to natural selection, an important element of the evolutionary process for Darwin and for present-day biologists.
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  37. orgasmatron
    • 2009 February 15, Patricia Leigh Brown, “The Little Gold Man in a New Blue World”, New York Times:
      Among the eras have been Louis Quatorze (1967), Space Odyssey Moderne (2001) and perpetual futuristic spins on picture-palace Deco, including last year’s show, hosted by Jon Stewart , in which towering Oscars were encased in see-through capsules, resembling the orgasmatron in Woody Allen ’s 1973 film “Sleeper.”
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  38. paco *
    • 2009 February 15, Alexei Barrionuevo, “Softer Policy on Drugs Is Debated in Argentina”, New York Times:
      The drug paco — a highly addictive chemical byproduct of cocaine production — has in just a few short years become a deadly plague of the poor here.
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  39. pongamia
    • 2009 February 15, Thomas L. Friedman, “Yes, They Could. So They Did.”, New York Times:
      They also brought along a solar-powered band, plus a luggage truck that ran on plant oil extracted from jatropha and pongamia, plants locally grown on wasteland.
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  40. prefight
  41. quatrefoils
    • 2009 February 15, Christopher Gray, “A Hodgepodge Block”, New York Times:
      The Refuge building, designed by Ziegler & Wenz, has intricate terra-cotta work on the upper floors — starbursts, quatrefoils, medallions and a female head.
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  42. readmittance
    • 2009 February 15, Stephen P. Williams, “Elbow Room and Elbow Grease”, New York Times:
      She refused, and was denied readmittance to the program.
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  43. recreativity
    • 2009 February 15, William Safire, “Rifacimento”, New York Times:
      Such recreativity is accelerating today, especially in music, suggesting to me an updating to “the radical refashioning of a work of art, often by computer.”
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  44. relicense
    • 2009 February 15, Peter Applebome, “Indian Point And a License To Disagree”, New York Times:
      The regulatory commission has never turned down a proposal to relicense a nuclear plant, and the narrow scope of the formal review process alone almost guarantees relicensing.
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  45. relicensing
    • 2009 February 15, Peter Applebome, “Indian Point And a License To Disagree”, New York Times:
      The regulatory commission has never turned down a proposal to relicense a nuclear plant, and the narrow scope of the formal review process alone almost guarantees relicensing.
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  46. repromote
    • 2009 February 15, William Safire, “Rifacimento”, New York Times:
      In the mid-’90s, Time Out magazine held that ‘ ‘remix albums are generally a pretty tawdry way to repromote old material,” but a decade later, a Bloomberg reviewer of the Beatles ’ “Love” had a happier view of the magpie medium: “The Beatles’ ‘new’ CD remixes the group’s masterpieces, with surprisingly enchanting results.”
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  47. restrictionist
    • 2009 February 15, “Helping Workers in Hard Times”, New York Times:
      The avalanche of lost jobs and grim national mood cry out for the laying of blame, and restrictionist groups are angrily pointing the finger at illegal immigrants.
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  48. roamings
    • 2009 February 15, Judith Martin, “It Started in Naples”, New York Times:
      That last problem did intrude on Hazzard’s roamings, and when she refers to the living city it is with periodic references to thefts of cars and wallets, with a warning not to carry anything “snatchable” by the thieves on motorcycles who whiz through the streets.
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  49. scratchboard
    • 2009 February 15, “Children’s Bookshelf”, New York Times:
      The scratchboard and watercolor drawings zoom in and out, giving an aerial view of neat checkerboards of fields around a little “house in the night .
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  50. submetering
  51. submeters
    • 2009 February 15, Manny Fernandez, “State Freezes Plan to Have Tenants Pay Electric Bills”, New York Times:
      Proponents say residential submeters encourage tenants to reduce their energy consumption by making households that never had to worry about electricity costs take financial responsibility for the power they use.
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  52. superspeedways
  53. tartuffo
  54. unpeopled
    • 2009 February 15, Judith Martin, “It Started in Naples”, New York Times:
      Otherwise, Hazzard’s Naples is curiously unpeopled by the living.
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  55. unsentimentally
    • 2009 February 15, David Pogue, “Where the Wild Things Are Victims”, New York Times:
      This is all handled unsentimentally and with a positive spirit; Nick conceals his grief, calls his dad Lefty and tapes down his own right arm in solidarity.
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  56. updater
    • 2009 February 15, Virginia Heffernan, “Being There”, New York Times:
      My friend Lizzie, who is an actual poet, is a terrific, prolific updater.
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  57. vastnesses
    • 2009 February 15, Donald G. Mcneil, “The Long, Dusty Trek Toward Tolerance”, New York Times:
      But Mr. Davies and his director, Bruce Neibaur, have done it for the first time in Imax, a format in which the vastnesses of deserts and seas show up superbly on vastnesses of screen and in which aerial shots capture every face in a crowd.
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  58. zoomable
    • 2009 February 15, Richard B. Woodward, “Book Review: Oxford Atlas of the World (15th edition)”, New York Times:
      MapQuest and G.P.S. devices are obviating local street guides, while Google and Digital Globe give the kind of zoomable views of earth from on high that were once for C.I.A. eyes only.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. butched
  2. jager *
    • 2009 February 15, Virginia Heffernan, “Being There”, New York Times:
      Thanks 2 all that came, especially those that contributed jager or tequilla.
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  3. nordic
    • 2009 February 15, The Associated Press, “Riesch Wins Slalom at Worlds; With a Cut Thumb, Vonn Falls”, New York Times:
      KOWALCZYK TAKES NORDIC RACE Poland’s Justyna Kowalczyk won the nordic ski World Cup 10-kilometer classic-style race ahead of Italy’s Marianna Longa and Petra Majdic of Slovenia.
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  4. rellie
    • 2009 February 15, Virginia Heffernan, “Being There”, New York Times:
      Euan is eating the legendary annalisa rellie seville orange marmalade.
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  5. staghorn
    • 2009 February 15, Dominique Browning, “Plant Love”, New York Times:
      Sunlight flooded through tall bay windows, into which they crammed a ficus tree, a palm and a staghorn fern on a wooden slab — oh, for the ’70s!
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