User:Visviva/NYT 20090222

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-02-22 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-22).

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117213 tokens ‧ 85744 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 11189 types ‧ 72 (~ 0.643%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-02-22[edit]

  1. adinkra
    • 2009 February 22, Alexi Worth, “El Anatsui”, New York Times, page 152:
      In Ghana, the most common of these appear on cloths worn at funerals and are called adinkra.
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  2. adspeak
    • 2009 February 22, S.S. Fair, “Curl, Interrupted”, New York Times, page 94:
      No Volume prizes, either: volume is adspeak for clumping.
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  3. anklelike
    • 2009 February 22, J. David Goodman, “The Night of the Foot”, New York Times:
      I could now make out a slight, anklelike crink, which is how I found myself thinking, suddenly, at once: foot.
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  4. antimaterialist
    • 2009 February 22, Jane And Michael Stern, “Nirvana Express”, New York Times:
      In many places, the antimaterialist hippies’ arrival stimulated a crass tourist trade and an attendant defilement of native culture.
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  5. batwing
    • 2009 February 22, Rebecca Voight, “Now Channeling”, New York Times, page 76:
      But Guggenheim’s most recognizable accessories were her batwing, butterfly-shaped, gilded and bejeweled eyeglass frames, courtesy of the artist Edward Melcarth, a friend and fellow Venice resident in the 1950s.
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  6. blacklistings
    • 2009 February 22, Kevin Baker, “Blood on the Street”, New York Times:
      Efforts to unionize were routinely met with clubbings, shootings, jailings, blacklistings and executions, perpetrated not only by well-armed legions of company goons, but also by police officers, deputies, National Guardsmen and even regular soldiers.
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  7. bloglodytes
    • 2009 February 22, S.S. Fair, “Curl, Interrupted”, New York Times, page 94:
      Sephora’s feedback page bristles with bloglodytes who don’t get Big Fatty’s fun.
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  8. bonefishing
    • 2009 February 22, “Letter: Gone Fishing”, New York Times:
      Nevertheless, I thoroughly enjoyed your article on bonefishing in the Bahamas — perhaps because the fish are tossed back.
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  9. bruisingly
    • 2009 February 22, Nate Chinen, “Band Benefits, Belters and B-3s”, New York Times:
      This bruisingly intense Italian trio — Luca T. Mai on baritone saxophone, Massimo Pupillo on electric bass and Jacopo Battaglia on drums — has been making records for the last decade.
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  10. chaveta
    • 2009 February 22, Sophia Hollander, “Why the Smoke Doesn’t Get in Their Eyes”, New York Times:
      Deftly rolling, pressing and slicing tobacco leaves with a slab of sharp metal known as a chaveta, they sculptured perfectly cylindrical cigars — an art that requires years to master.
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  11. clawingly
    • 2009 February 22, Walter Kirn, “Insult as Injury”, New York Times:
      Would Denby have rather had the magazine pick targets less maniacally vain and clawingly ubiquitous?
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  12. collegelike
    • 2009 February 22, Robin Marantz Henig, “What’s Wrong With Summer Stiers?”, New York Times:
      Under the direction of William Gahl, a longtime N.I.H. investigator who is also the clinical director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, the program brings together scientists from most of the N.I.H.’s 27 research institutes and centers on a collegelike campus in Bethesda, Md. Organizationally, it creates a kind of superdiagnostician, whose orientation would be to look at not just one piece at a time but at the whole darn elephant.
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  13. countertrends
    • 2009 February 22, Holly Brubach, “Enough About You”, New York Times, page 130:
      They see countertrends like the “simplicity movement” but no sign of a widespread backlash.
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  14. crink
    • 2009 February 22, J. David Goodman, “The Night of the Foot”, New York Times:
      I could now make out a slight, anklelike crink, which is how I found myself thinking, suddenly, at once: foot.
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  15. demonically
    • 2009 February 22, Jason Goodwin, “Mongolia and the Madman”, New York Times:
      Like many mad people, Ungern had the glittering eye and the gift for wandering prophecy that could, at a pinch, be taken for inspiration; and for a while his life seemed to be demonically protected.
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  16. eyeshadow
    • 2009 February 22, S.S. Fair, “Curl, Interrupted”, New York Times, page 94:
      Young man, got any eyeshadow?
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  17. famiglia *
    • 2009 February 22, Armand Limnander, “Valli of the Dolls”, New York Times, page 120:
      (On the mantel in his studio, next to notes from various celebrities, there is an old photo of the famiglia at an audience with Pope Paul VI. Valli is a toddler, and he’s wearing spiffy turquoise shorts.)
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  18. fashionese
    • 2009 February 22, Horacio Silva, “Words on the Street”, New York Times, page 117:
      / French for Africa, the second largest continent; fashionese for the single biggest trend on the Continent, as Europe’s influential labels make reference to African motifs refracted through the prism of ’70s YSL-inspired glamour, as in, “I’m j’adoring my Miu Miu Mau Mau muumuu — it’s very chic d’Afrique.”
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  19. fetishization
    • 2009 February 22, Christopher Petkanas, “Chichi Devil”, New York Times, page 132:
      Vilmorin has largely slipped through the cracks in America, despite the fetishization of such outre-mer style icons from the same period as Marie-Laure de Noailles and Daisy Fellowes.
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  20. hambone
    • 2009 February 22, J. David Goodman, “The Night of the Foot”, New York Times:
      Perhaps I was afraid of being laughed at if the mysterious item turned out to be a hambone, a distinct possibility.
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  21. hatty
    • 2009 February 22, Horacio Silva, “Love Child”, New York Times, page 126:
      The hat, which was originally intended to be made in flock, was rethought in leather and suede, and a seam was added from the base through the crown — to give it a “more hatty, saddlery feel,” Grand explained.
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  22. heeeere
    • 2009 February 22, Marilyn Stasio, “Death of a Cadet”, New York Times:
      (“Going into the backstretch, the Victorians are holding the lead, but the Medievalists are gaining, and heeeere comes the Age of Enlightenment!”)
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  23. interruptus
    • 2009 February 22, Manohla Dargis, “Hey, Laaaaady! It’s the King of Comedy”, New York Times:
      Much like the nightclub act that made them famous, their movies essentially recycled this same stooge dynamic, with Martin playing the singing straight man foiled by Lewis’s comic interruptus.
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  24. jailings
    • 2009 February 22, Kevin Baker, “Blood on the Street”, New York Times:
      Efforts to unionize were routinely met with clubbings, shootings, jailings, blacklistings and executions, perpetrated not only by well-armed legions of company goons, but also by police officers, deputies, National Guardsmen and even regular soldiers.
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  25. japery
    • 2009 February 22, Walter Kirn, “Insult as Injury”, New York Times:
      In his opening pages he defines snark negatively — as a practice that certain famed comics are often charged with, but undeservedly and inaccurately because they actually trade in “irony” and also, one can’t help but gather from Denby’s remarks, because they’re politically virtuous in their japery, even when their words seem cruel and harsh.
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  26. kisaeng
    • 2009 February 22, Gia Kourlas, “The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Courtesan”, New York Times:
      For his newest work, “Kisaeng becomes you,” to be performed at Dance Theater Workshop starting Wednesday, he explores that isolation through the poetry of the kisaeng, Korean courtesans who were trained in the arts of entertainment, from the 10th to the 20th centuries.
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  27. krewe
    • 2009 February 22, Thomas Mallon, “Storyville”, New York Times:
      In 2004, as captain of the Rex krewe — one of the more progressive Mardi Gras organizations — Billy made a hesitant approach, too little and too late, trying to get to know Tootie Montana.
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  28. lamebrained
    • 2009 February 22, Walter Kirn, “Insult as Injury”, New York Times:
      One almost wonders if what he so deplores about what he calls “the hunting of the snark” is that, invariably — given his obtuseness about the necessity of irreverent laughter, even if it’s rude, unfair or lamebrained, in revealing or merely helping to abide perceived arrogance and fraudulence — someday the snark would come for books like his.
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  29. laserdisc
    • 2009 February 22, Dave Kehr, “A Sundance Film Before Sundance”, New York Times:
      “Akira” has appeared on home video several times before (including a Criterion laserdisc from 1993 treasured by anime buffs), but this Blu-ray release from Bandai Entertainment not only improves the image quality but also offers an insanely high-definition version of the Japanese soundtrack (5.1 channel Dolby True HD at 192 kHz/24 bit, to be excessively precise) that will test the limits of your system and alienate your neighbors forever.
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  30. mamacitas *
    • 2009 February 22, Zarah Crawford, “Wrap Star”, New York Times, page 74:
      Lately, the cult of the apron has been gaining ground — witness “Desperate Housewives” and the earthy mamacitas of Pedro Almodóvar ’s films.
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  31. megaproducers
    • 2009 February 22, Alex Hawgood, “Beth Ditto”, New York Times, page 188:
      “This league is all new to me,” says the lead singer of the post-punk band Gossip, who’s currently in the studio working with the megaproducers Rick Rubin and James Ford (of Simian Mobile Disco fame).
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  32. microfibers
    • 2009 February 22, S.S. Fair, “Curl, Interrupted”, New York Times, page 94:
      Notorious B.I.G. Award: Following the fat-is-beautiful theme, DuWop Lash Venom has microfibers that plump without clump.
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  33. monokinis
    • 2009 February 22, Cathy Horyn, “Oscar’s...Wild!”, New York Times, page 176:
      The remark was typical of him, and considering that our exchange took place the day after he and his wife had dined at the Kissingers’, in early December, with Timothy Geithner , Lawrence H. Summers , Robert Rubin and Mayor Bloomberg , it suggested the range and quality of his chitchat — from bailouts all the way to monokinis.
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  34. multilabel
    • 2009 February 22, Alix Browne, “The Big Picture”, New York Times:
      “I was determined to send out a clear message of change,” Armani explains of the store’s multilabel concept, “interpreting the current trend for mixing genres and juxtaposing items in different price brackets.”
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  35. multileveled
  36. multipicture
    • 2009 February 22, Manohla Dargis, “Hey, Laaaaady! It’s the King of Comedy”, New York Times:
      In 1959 he signed a multipicture deal with Paramount for $10 million — more than $70 million in today’s dollars.
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  37. neighborhoody
  38. nonarrival
    • 2009 February 22, Ben Brantley, “Again, a Time to Wait for Whatever”, New York Times:
      And it is just possible that in the silence of his nonarrival this year, theatergoers who never knew his name, or haven’t thought about him in ages, may hear the sound of their own troubled thoughts quite clearly.
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  39. nonperformer
    • 2009 February 22, Gia Kourlas, “The Loneliness of the Long-Distant Courtesan”, New York Times:
      When it all works — and both Mr. Moss and Ms. Kim admit that involving a nonperformer is a risk — the production successfully captures the vulnerability of a kisaeng as she looks back at her life.
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  40. ofte *
    • 2009 February 22, William Safire, “Hard Times”, New York Times:
      In the year 1390, more than six centuries ago, the poet John Gower — whose genes somehow escaped transmission to modern business cyclists — wrote, “It hath ben sene and felt full ofte/The harde time after the softe.”
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  41. outbreed
    • 2009 February 22, Lynn Phillips, “Survival of the Hippest”, New York Times, page 82:
      Showy peacocks attract more predators, but they outbreed drabber rivals just because peahens adore flashy tails.
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  42. overembellished
    • 2009 February 22, Horacio Silva, “Love Child”, New York Times, page 126:
      The subject of advertising and Grand is as complicated as the overembellished shoes she worked on with Marc Jacobs for the current Vuitton collection.
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  43. overinvolved
    • 2009 February 22, Elsa Dixler, “Paperback Row”, New York Times:
      A young couple’s marriage is threatened when the husband, a social worker, becomes overinvolved with a disturbed client in this well-written novel, Gaige’s second.
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  44. overlogging
    • 2009 February 22, Chandler Burr, “Whole Lot of Non-Scents”, New York Times, page 110:
      In 1908, a species of Chilean sandalwood vanished from overlogging, and its creamy wood scent vanished with it.
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  45. panthenol
    • 2009 February 22, S.S. Fair, “Curl, Interrupted”, New York Times, page 94:
      Sally Field Award: Wet n Wild Beauty Benefits Beyond Nourishing with marine and soy proteins, panthenol and a daytime, no-drama appeal.
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  46. partnerless
    • 2009 February 22, Daphne Merkin, “Butch Fatale”, New York Times, page 112:
      In the ongoing dance of the sexes, women who remain partnerless are referred to as “wallflowers” while unpartnered men are simply that — not yet taken.
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  47. preforeclosure
    • 2009 February 22, Elsa Brenner, “Nervous Agencies Change Ways”, New York Times:
      According to RealtyTrac.com , 2,259 Westchester homes are in preforeclosure (meaning their owners have defaulted on the mortgage, but formal proceedings have not yet begun); 237 are about to be auctioned; and 358 are about to be taken over by banks.
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  48. principessa *
    • 2009 February 22, Armand Limnander, “Valli of the Dolls”, New York Times, page 120:
      Needless to say, it is Angelica and not a prim principessa who winds up with the aristocrat Tancredi Falconeri, played by Alain Delon.
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  49. regionalists
    • 2009 February 22, Jedediah Purdy, “The Coast of Utopia”, New York Times:
      “Beyond the Revolution” is scornful of regionalists, traditionalists and anyone else who would restrict the scope of American identity.
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  50. saloniste
    • 2009 February 22, Christopher Petkanas, “Chichi Devil”, New York Times, page 132:
      How desolate was this French femme de lettres and saloniste, legendary clotheshorse and tastemaker, brilliant hostess and home-wrecking man slayer?
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  51. sankofa
    • 2009 February 22, Alexi Worth, “El Anatsui”, New York Times, page 152:
      One of the adinkra symbols, sankofa, is an image of a bird turning back toward its tail; its meaning is sometimes translated as “return and retrieve,” or “go back and pick.”
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  52. sauvage *
    • 2009 February 22, Horacio Silva, “Temptress Josephine”, New York Times, page 71:
      “Unfortunately, her role is usually overlooked in favor of the sauvage image of her in the banana skirt that Cocteau created for her to wear in the Folies-Bergère.
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  53. schusterfleck
  54. sinkward
    • 2009 February 22, S.S. Fair, “Curl, Interrupted”, New York Times, page 94:
      Remove with warm water and don’t freak when the little black “tubes” fall sinkward.
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  55. sledgehammered
    • 2009 February 22, Jane And Michael Stern, “Nirvana Express”, New York Times:
      She’s trying to piece together shards of precious pottery gleefully sledgehammered by a delegation led by the Taliban ’s minister of culture, who deemed the world’s greatest collection of Central Asian artifacts un-Islamic.
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  56. snarkers
    • 2009 February 22, Walter Kirn, “Insult as Injury”, New York Times:
      Sarah Silverman escapes unscathed, while Penn Jillette, an avowed libertarian who entertains mostly in Las Vegas nowadays, and Sarah Palin , an avowed big-game hunter who’s safely tucked away up north somewhere, are portrayed as snarkers par excellence.
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  57. snickerers
    • 2009 February 22, Walter Kirn, “Insult as Injury”, New York Times:
      Snickering at power has it uses, whatever Denby imagines drives the snickerers, and however he belittles their spitting prose.
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  58. superdiagnostician
    • 2009 February 22, Robin Marantz Henig, “What’s Wrong With Summer Stiers?”, New York Times:
      Under the direction of William Gahl, a longtime N.I.H. investigator who is also the clinical director of the National Human Genome Research Institute, the program brings together scientists from most of the N.I.H.’s 27 research institutes and centers on a collegelike campus in Bethesda, Md. Organizationally, it creates a kind of superdiagnostician, whose orientation would be to look at not just one piece at a time but at the whole darn elephant.
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  59. tobaccoless
    • 2009 February 22, Sophia Hollander, “Why the Smoke Doesn’t Get in Their Eyes”, New York Times:
      He was intrigued by the pitch: odorless, tobaccoless products that companies claimed offered the experience of smoking — without all the hazards.
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  60. touristified
    • 2009 February 22, Tobin Harshaw, “Antique Road Show”, New York Times:
      Then to Greece , where instead of mooning about the touristified battle sites of Thermopylae and Marathon, Marozzi lays waste to a three-day conference of pretentious academics.
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  61. trayf
    • 2009 February 22, Sam Sifton, “Put a Lid on It”, New York Times:
      To the preparation, then: vegetables softened in butter, lots of Guinness, thick chunks of second-cut brisket — breast deckle, as it’s called in some of New York’s better precincts (where trotter gear, by the by, is known as trayf city).
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  62. tsavorite
    • 2009 February 22, Sandra Ballentine, “The New Collectibles”, New York Times, page 96:
      The materials may be mixed, but this Panthère de Cartier 18-karat gold, diamond, tsavorite garnet, onyx and black lacquer earring screams purebred.
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  63. ultraglossy
    • 2009 February 22, Horacio Silva, “Love Child”, New York Times, page 126:
      A few minutes later, as Grand, nursing an incipient cold, walked me through the contents of the debut issue of Love, it was clear she was taking a less whimsical, more rough-hewn approach to contemporary glamour than she had at the playfully self-deprecating but ultraglossy Pop.
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  64. ultraprescriptive
    • 2009 February 22, William Safire, “Hard Times”, New York Times:
      Prisoners on long sentences do hard time ; students corrected by ultraprescriptive grammarians say, “Don’t give me a hard time .”
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  65. unalluring
    • 2009 February 22, Daphne Merkin, “Butch Fatale”, New York Times, page 112:
      But when it comes to the love that dares not speak its name between women, it appears that no one’s interested enough to pay it any mind — as though lesbianism were nothing more than a silly game played by a tiny pack of unalluring inverts.
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  66. unblackens
    • 2009 February 22, S.S. Fair, “Curl, Interrupted”, New York Times, page 94:
      And the price-slasher flick of the year goes to Nuxe Toning Lotion With 3 Roses, which unblackens eyes, refreshes skin and turbo-charges pores, all for the low price of $22.
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  67. uncinematic
  68. underloved
    • 2009 February 22, Manohla Dargis, “Hey, Laaaaady! It’s the King of Comedy”, New York Times:
      These days this underloved genius of modern cinema — a box-office giant and critical punching bag, a fetish figure for French cinephiles and enduring bewilderment for middlebrow tastemakers of all provenances — remains better known for his annual television fund-raisers, along with his off-color slurs about women and gay men, than for the more than 50 movies he’s made during his improbable career as a star, writer, director, producer and technical innovator.
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  69. unpartnered
    • 2009 February 22, Daphne Merkin, “Butch Fatale”, New York Times, page 112:
      In the ongoing dance of the sexes, women who remain partnerless are referred to as “wallflowers” while unpartnered men are simply that — not yet taken.
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  70. unplanted
    • 2009 February 22, Jesse Mckinley, “Severe Drought Adds to Hardships in California”, New York Times:
      Last year, during the second year of the drought, more than 100,000 acres of the 4.7 million in the valley were left unplanted, and experts predict that number could soar to nearly 850,000 acres this year.
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Sequestered[edit]