User:Visviva/NYT 20090226

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2009-02-25) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2009-02-26
  • List status: open
→ Next (2009-02-27)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-02-26 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-02-26).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ] - [ This day's: GuardianToronto Star - Herald Sun ]

103244 tokens ‧ 77031 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 9207 types ‧ 34 (~ 0.369%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-02-26[edit]

  1. aromatherapizes
    • 2009 February 26, Cintra Wilson, “When Your Clothes Have a Backstory”, New York Times:
      Another olfactory blast of cedar aromatherapizes the mind, with the bonus addition of generous mirrors; enough bars to really hang your clothes on; good, soft light; and a nice bench — an excellent place to take off all your clothes.
      add
  2. cholla
  3. cogongrass
    • 2009 February 26, Robert Pear, “House Passes Spending Bill, and Critics Are Quick to Point Out Pork”, New York Times:
      It also includes $208,000 to control a weed known as cogongrass in Mississippi; $1.2 million to control cormorants in Michigan, Mississippi, New York and Vermont; $1 million to control Mormon crickets in Utah; and $162,000 to control rodents in Hawaii.
      add
  4. counterplot
    • 2009 February 26, “On the Horizon: Novels by Philip Roth”, New York Times:
      “The Humbling,” which is scheduled for the fall, is a novel about an aging stage actor whose empty life is altered by “a counterplot of unusual erotic desire,” the publisher said.
      add
  5. devaluating
    • 2009 February 26, Teri Karush Rogers, “And Do I Hear $2 Million? No? $1 Million? Sold!”, New York Times:
      “We’re in a deflationary, devaluating market in which no one knows the value of anything anymore,” said Jon Gollinger, the co-founder and chief executive of the firm, based in Boston.
      add
  6. dimethicone
    • 2009 February 26, Jennifer A. Kingson, “Singling Out Eczema Sufferers”, New York Times:
      The active ingredient in both products is dimethicone, a skin protectant also found in less-expensive drugstore creams.
      add
  7. excoriatingly
    • 2009 February 26, Patricia Cohen, “Not Much Sympathy for Zoë Heller’s Characters, but a Little Understanding”, New York Times:
      Released in Britain last fall, “The Believers” prompted a reviewer to write in The Guardian that Audrey is “a hilarious, foul-mouthed harridan: part monster, part inspiring law unto herself, her approach so excoriatingly direct that the reader waits in wincing glee for her next spitting and swearing tirade.”
      add
  8. geotagging
  9. gunbattle
  10. investable
    • 2009 February 26, Ron Lieber, “Rules for the New Reality”, New York Times:
      So when Prince & Associates, a market research firm in Redding, Conn., polled people with more than $1 million in investable assets, it wasn’t any great surprise that 81 percent intended to take money out of the hands of their financial advisers .
      add
  11. jabara
    • 2009 February 26, Jennifer A. Kingson, “Singling Out Eczema Sufferers”, New York Times:
      Clinique says that Comfort on Call, which hit stores in January, is better than lower-price choices because of exotic ingredients like the peel of the jabara fruit, which a company spokeswoman said is grown only in a region in Japan where most people have no allergies .
      add
  12. miniboxes
    • 2009 February 26, David Pogue, “Geniuses at Play, on the Job”, New York Times:
      Today, at iGoogle (google.com/ig ), you can dress up all that white space with useful miniboxes containing additional info.
      add
  13. mufflerless
    • 2009 February 26, Cintra Wilson, “When Your Clothes Have a Backstory”, New York Times:
      I’VE always admired the astringent fashion rules of my childhood friend, Lord Relentless Ha. Discriminating San Francisco hoodlums favored a certain heavy twill, bomber-cut “Derby” jacket. Mr. Ha thought that the crisp industrial angles of a new Derby jacket were gauche, so before presenting one as a gift, he put it through a rigorous set of tortures, which, I believe, began with dragging it behind his mufflerless (“loud ’n’ proud”) late-model Cadillac.
      add
  14. nonylphenol
  15. overclass
    • 2009 February 26, Ginia Bellafante, “Lifestyles of the Rich, Famous and African-American”, New York Times:
      “Newbos: The Rise of America’s New Black Overclass,” a special to be shown Thursday on CNBC, is not about an overclass made up of oncologists and software designers and investment analysts at global banks.
      add
  16. overcoated
    • 2009 February 26, Cintra Wilson, “When Your Clothes Have a Backstory”, New York Times:
      It’s a thoughtful, slouchy, post-Cedar Tavern, Disillusioned Preppy Unisex look, still accustomed to intense, status-minded fashion scrutiny, but overcoated by a spalike, de-stressed and soul-seeky note I’ll call Reprioritized Values or The Benefits of Acupuncture.
      add
  17. pearlized
    • 2009 February 26, Ruth La Ferla, “From the Eyes to Her Lips”, New York Times:
      The models’ insolent pout was enhanced by a pearlized mouth.
      add
  18. plasticky
    • 2009 February 26, Danielle Belopotosky, “A Walk Through a Crop of Readers”, New York Times:
      The keyboard lets you add notes to text, but no one is going to want to write a novel of their own using its small plasticky buttons.
      add
  19. podocarpus
    • 2009 February 26, Stephen Orr, “Not All Trees Are Cut Out to Be Bonsai”, New York Times:
      Indoor bonsai — tropical and subtropical plants like ficus, Ming aralia, podocarpus and dwarf jade — are easier to care for and will thrive inside.
      add
  20. prebattered
    • 2009 February 26, Cintra Wilson, “When Your Clothes Have a Backstory”, New York Times:
      BUSHTIT Extra soft, prebattered, unisex safari and beachfront casuals ought to excite both downtown and uptown girls, Chelsea boys and Republicans alike.
      add
  21. pretrashed
    • 2009 February 26, Cintra Wilson, “When Your Clothes Have a Backstory”, New York Times:
      It is possible to look at these pretrashed jeans as more than just a look that sedentary poseurs borrow to mimic outdoorsy virility.
      add
  22. protectant
    • 2009 February 26, Jennifer A. Kingson, “Singling Out Eczema Sufferers”, New York Times:
      The active ingredient in both products is dimethicone, a skin protectant also found in less-expensive drugstore creams.
      add
  23. spalike
    • 2009 February 26, Cintra Wilson, “When Your Clothes Have a Backstory”, New York Times:
      It’s a thoughtful, slouchy, post-Cedar Tavern, Disillusioned Preppy Unisex look, still accustomed to intense, status-minded fashion scrutiny, but overcoated by a spalike, de-stressed and soul-seeky note I’ll call Reprioritized Values or The Benefits of Acupuncture.
      add
  24. undercelebrated
    • 2009 February 26, Cintra Wilson, “When Your Clothes Have a Backstory”, New York Times:
      In “The Recognitions,” the famously undercelebrated doorstop by William Gaddis , the virtuosity of a painter who makes counterfeit “undiscovered” paintings by Flemish masters is the vehicle through which Gaddis questions the genuineness of other forms of art, life and religion.
      add
  25. untelevised
    • 2009 February 26, Edward Wyatt, “15 Years of Blood (Fake), Sweat and Tears (Real)”, New York Times:
      For them there are no red carpets or magazine covers, and the awards they receive are the type given out at the untelevised, less glamorous portions of awards events — none of which dampens their enthusiasm for their work.
      add
  26. walkups
    • 2009 February 26, Audrey Tempelsman, “Indian Modern Redux”, New York Times:
      The apartment is in the Flowerbox Building, a new doorman condominium on East Seventh Street named after the built-in, self-watering flower boxes that stand in contrast to the street’s dingier tenement walkups.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. fessing
    • 2009 February 26, Roy Furchgott, “You’ve Sold Your Stocks. Now What?”, New York Times:
      “I spent a lot of time trying to figure out what was happening in the financial industry, and I came to the conclusion that people weren’t fessing up,” he said.
      add
  2. staghorn