User:Visviva/NYT 20090308

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-03-08 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-08).

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109120 tokens ‧ 80842 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 11007 types ‧ 64 (~ 0.581%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-03-08[edit]

  1. abacost *
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Leslie Camhi, “Man of a Thousand Faces”, New York Times, page 82:
      Zaire’s strongman, Mobutu Sese Seko , whose magical emblem of power, a leopard-skin toque, advertised his allegiance to tribal tradition, mandated the abacost for his followers.
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  2. aluminumized
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Robert E. Bryan, “Nylon Run”, New York Times, page 40:
      A decade later, the skiwear company Bogner was dressing James Bond for the slopes, but reality soon trumped make-believe with the nylon-coated aluminumized spacesuit worn by John Glenn and the other Mercury astronauts.
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  3. besuited
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Suzy Menkes, “Working Stiff”, New York Times, page 74:
      Thom Browne even staged an office from the 1950s, where I waited for one figure in a line of besuited workers, heads down in front of a martinet of a boss, to break out as Superman.
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  4. blossomings
    • 2009 March 8, Pico Iyer, “Crimes of Innocence”, New York Times:
      “The Vagrants” begins on March 21, 1979 — the spring equinox — which is this careful writer’s way of telling us that a long winter of privation and darkness may be giving way, at last, to the blossomings of spring.
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  5. boatneck
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Lee Carter, “The Magnificent Seven”, New York Times, page 42:
      In the wrong hands, the New England nautical look can go overboard, but Keith Richardson and Jerrod Cornish of Corpus keep things fresh with rolled-up faded jeans, boatneck tees in sunset colors and wrinkled neckerchiefs.
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  6. boychick
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Horacio Silva, “Words on the Street”, New York Times, page 73:
      / A term of endearment, taken from Yiddish, for a young boy or man; a gender-fluid buzzword for the “oy fey!” man-child looks that slinked their way down Europe’s most influential runways, as in, “Bugle-beaded chinos — boychick or tragic?” or, ”Dude, chicks dig boychicks, but the bro clutch is too much.”
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  7. boychicks
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Horacio Silva, “Words on the Street”, New York Times, page 73:
      / A term of endearment, taken from Yiddish, for a young boy or man; a gender-fluid buzzword for the “oy fey!” man-child looks that slinked their way down Europe’s most influential runways, as in, “Bugle-beaded chinos — boychick or tragic?” or, ”Dude, chicks dig boychicks, but the bro clutch is too much.”
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  8. boyishlooking
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Lynn Hirschberg, “Screen Test”, New York Times, page 94:
      When he walks into a room, he’s a boyishlooking guy with big eyes that he likes to pop even wider.
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  9. canyonland
    • 2009 March 8, Christopher Solomon, “Mountain Man”, New York Times:
      But I soon realized that whoever described the city as a concrete canyonland had his topography all wrong.
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  10. chronometrophile
    • 2009 2009-03-08, David Colman, “The Time Keeper”, New York Times, page 76:
      So Mayer started digging into the mountain of details that make up the world of the obsessive chronometrophile and came out the other side way too conversant.
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  11. cigarmaker
    • 2009 March 8, C.J. Hughes, “Adding Bands to the Beat”, New York Times:
      Charles Goldstein, a cigarmaker, built Webster Hall in 1886 for $75,000, with a design by Charles Rentz Jr., an architect and beer vendor, for “balls, receptions, Hebrew weddings and sociables,” according to a December 1886 article in The New York Times.
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  12. couchside
    • 2009 March 8, Howard Kaplan, “Analyze This”, New York Times:
      His approach to his subjects would seem to borrow something from his gentle couchside manner.
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  13. covetable
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Sandra Ballentine, “In-Store / Southern Comforts”, New York Times, page 56:
      These Day-Glo Caran d’Ache pens ($20) are too bright to lose, but according to Mashburn, they’re also “so covetable your friends will probably steal them.”
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  14. excretorily
    • 2009 March 8, David Gates, “The Monster in the Mirror”, New York Times:
      Still, novelists love those kinky, stinky Nazis — like Norman Mailer ’s excretorily fixated young Adi Hitler in “The Castle in the Forest” and A. N. Wilson ’s full-grown flatulent Führer in “Winnie and Wolf” — with their telltale mania for purity, order and efficiency.
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  15. fedayeen
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Edward Helmore, “The Revolution Will Be Televised”, New York Times, page 46:
      Baader, always in Ray-Bans, was an uncooperative student of the Palestinian fedayeen, once insisting that his velvet trousers, not green battle dress, were the correct choice for live-ammunition training.
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  16. foretopman
    • 2009 March 8, Alessandra Stanley, “The Vanishing Sidekick”, New York Times:
      WHEN Jimmy Fallon showed up on NBC ’s “Late Night” last week without a sidekick, it looked like yet another sign that the Ed McMahon era is over; so many talk show hosts work solo that the second-banana position seems almost as obsolete as the foretopman or the Linotype operator.
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  17. furbelows
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Suzy Menkes, “Working Stiff”, New York Times, page 74:
      Although Anne Hollander suggested in her intriguing 1995 book “Sex and Suits” that the introduction of the suit actually drew attention to the masculine torso and represented male freedom from the frills and furbelows still worn by women at the beginning of the 19th century, I didn’t see much sex at the shows.
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  18. gallerinas
    • 2009 March 8, David Segal, “Pulling Art Sales Out of Thinning Air”, New York Times:
      He stood near the reception desk, beside several of the many gallerinas he employs, as a few hundred people milled around a collection of new photographs by Alec Soth and a cache of paintings by Andy Warhol that he bought last year, reportedly for $200 million.
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  19. goshes
    • 2009 March 8, Deborah Sontag, “Enter the Anti-Diva, Stage Right”, New York Times:
      In a recent interview at a rehearsal space in Times Square, Ms. Allen, a Tony Award winner and three-time Oscar nominee, averaged eight goshes an hour.
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  20. gropingly
    • 2009 March 8, Sara Corbett, “Portrait of an Artist as an Avatar”, New York Times:
      One time a few months ago, I accompanied Filthy to an outdoor dance club and watched as he did the Wet Kitty and simultaneously carried on a long, thoughtful conversation about art and poetry with a woman who, the entire time, was engaged in a gropingly erotic, lip-to-lip slow dance with another man — a tall, flowing-haired Fabio-type, who was shirtless and altogether impervious to Filthy’s presence.
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  21. hydrogeologist
    • 2009 March 8, Eilene Zimmerman, “Hiring in Hydrology Resists the Slump”, New York Times:
      SCOTT D. WARNER, principal hydrogeologist and a vice president at the environmental consulting firm Amec Geomatrix in Oakland, Calif., said demand for his firm’s services had been strong since the 1980s.
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  22. hydrogeologists
    • 2009 March 8, Eilene Zimmerman, “Hiring in Hydrology Resists the Slump”, New York Times:
      Hydrologists study the distribution, circulation and physical properties of water, with hydrogeologists focusing specifically on groundwater.
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  23. hyperspecialized
    • 2009 March 8, David Gates, “The Monster in the Mirror”, New York Times:
      While “The Kindly Ones” may have a Nabokovian narrator — obscurantist in his erudition, hyperspecialized in his sexual tastes — its exhaustively researched historicity and documentarian realism clearly derive from “War and Peace.”
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  24. hypervivid
    • 2009 March 8, Sara Corbett, “Portrait of an Artist as an Avatar”, New York Times:
      It is all just a digital swirl, a series of scripted animations and graphically sculptured landscapes that can seem hypervivid and at the same time totally surreal — just the sort of experimental and phantasmagoric place, you might argue, where an artist is likely to thrive.
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  25. microhistory
    • 2009 March 8, Drake Bennett, “Troublesome Element”, New York Times:
      The genre of pop microhistory into which his book fits — “Cod: A Biography of the Fish That Changed the World,” “Banana: The Fate of the Fruit that Changed the World,” and “Mauve: How One Man Invented a Color That Changed the World” — is predicated on the idea that these are not things people normally understand to be world-changing.
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  26. moviestars
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Lynn Hirschberg, “Screen Test”, New York Times, page 94:
      As much as I love actors like Johnny Depp , George Clooney and Denzel Washington , these big-time moviestars have been big-time movie stars for at least a decade.
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  27. muraled
    • 2009 March 8, April Dembosky, “Street Art Comes in From the Cold”, New York Times:
      Muralists from his group, a nonprofit arts organization based in the city’s heavily muraled Mission district, were hired to help paint Mr. Marshall’s massive design, which is to remain on display until the spring of 2010.
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  28. narratologist
    • 2009 March 8, Virginia Heffernan, “Flop”, New York Times:
      To win sympathy and kudos, according to at least one bad-beat narratologist, you have only to make clear how focused and intelligent you were, how high the stakes, how slim your odds of losing, how vile your opponent was and how well you command the idiom of your game.
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  29. nonbikers
    • 2009 March 8, Robert Sullivan, “The Wild Bunch”, New York Times:
      To be clear, cars are more likely to kill nonbikers; we still live in a world ruled by the ruthless car.
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  30. nunlike
    • 2009 March 8, Malena Watrous, “The Art and the Pity”, New York Times:
      Her cause is noble, but her character is static; her nunlike devotion to art makes his fixation frustrating.
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  31. nylonesque
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Robert E. Bryan, “Nylon Run”, New York Times, page 40:
      Now it’s the men’s runways that are filled with shiny nylon (and nylonesque) windbreakers.
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  32. operatics
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Lynn Hirschberg, “Screen Test”, New York Times, page 94:
      Although Jackson prefers the paranormal events on “Fringe” to the soap operatics on “Dawson’s Creek,” it’s easy to imagine him wooing a leading lady with grace and style.
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  33. outdress
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Maura Egan, “Con Artist”, New York Times, page 38:
      “Martin dressed in head-to-toe Burberry and made fun of everyone else who tried to outdress him.
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  34. overdocumented
    • 2009 March 8, Baz Dreisinger, “A Transracial Man”, New York Times:
      King, by contrast, is all but overdocumented; after schooling, he went west as a surveyor, summing up 10 years of work in two books, including the 815-page “Systematic Geology,” which told, one historian said, “a story only a trifle less dramatic than Genesis.”
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  35. postpartisanship
    • 2009 March 8, Matt Bai, “Yes, More Mr. Nice Guy”, New York Times:
      Not quite seven weeks into Barack Obama ’s presidency, the capital’s leading thinkers seem to agree that the era of postpartisanship is over.
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  36. premiumization
  37. reprivatization
    • 2009 March 8, Alan S. Blinder, “Nationalize? Hey, Not So Fast”, New York Times:
      POLITICAL OBSTACLES The process of nationalization and reprivatization went amazingly well in Sweden partly because it was remarkably free of political interference.
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  38. ropelike
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Monica Khemsurov, “Now Asking / What Would Jesus Wear?”, New York Times, page 40:
      These gladiator sandals, available at Opening Ceremony, consist of ropelike laces tethered to tire-rubber soles; the side-buckle moccasins are hand-stitched from a single piece of leather, one of the oldest shoemaking techniques.
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  39. semilegal
    • 2009 March 8, Robert F. Worth, “Saudis Race All Night, Fueled by Boredom”, New York Times:
      This may be the most popular sport of Saudi youth, an obsessive, semilegal competition that dominates weekend nights here.
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  40. shabeens
    • 2009 March 8, “Letter: The People of Cape Town”, New York Times:
      The shabeens on a Sunday afternoon were filled with families including young children running around, D.J.’s spinning amazing music and down-home people willing to discuss, in English, anything from Obama to Beyoncé .
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  41. simultaneities
  42. snaggleteeth
    • 2009 March 8, Sara Corbett, “Portrait of an Artist as an Avatar”, New York Times:
      He has a couple of sharp-looking snaggleteeth that poke out of the left side of his mouth, adding to his misfit charm.
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  43. spinouts
    • 2009 March 8, Robert F. Worth, “Saudis Race All Night, Fueled by Boredom”, New York Times:
      Sulayman al-Shulukhi, left, races his modified Subaru Impreza every weekend night and delights in describing wrecks and spinouts.
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  44. subheaded
    • 2009 March 8, William Safire, “Pay-to-Play”, New York Times:
      “Feds Interview Obama on ‘ Pay-to-Play ’ ” was the Washington Times headline last Christmas Eve, subheaded “Team’s Blagojevich review finds ‘nothing inappropriate’ ” in contacts between Gov. Rod Blagojevich of Illinois and White House aides about the replacement for the Senate seat Barack Obama was vacating.
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  45. swirlier
    • 2009 March 8, Ben Ratliff, “Expansive Pop, Hypnotic Jazz, Surprising Metal”, New York Times:
      The group’s music is swirlier and noisier and more cathartic than most black metal; its long pieces reward your attention with real musical narrative.
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  46. toile *
    • 2009 2009-03-08, Lee Carter, “The Magnificent Seven”, New York Times, page 42:
      In collaboration with Schott, Jeremy Scott has perfected the Perfecto — the biker jacket worn by Marlon Brando and Sid Vicious — with a toile print, polka dots and Keith Haring ’s pictograms.
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  47. trailerworthiness
    • 2009 March 8, Charles Isherwood, “Gossip Boy, but Just for a Day”, New York Times:
      As I was ushered to wardrobe (thumbs up for the outfit I’d brought) and hair (thumbs up for obvious lack thereof), the insidious sensation of trailerworthiness began quietly to unsettle my mind.
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  48. trashily
    • 2009 March 8, Jess Row, “Chinese Idol”, New York Times:
      It deals with the emergence of China as a capitalist market state, a story familiar to anyone who reads the newspapers, and it’s as blunt, puerile, libidinous and trashily sentimental as any 24 hours of American reality TV. All that ought to make it a blockbuster in the West, as it has been in China, where on its release in 2005 and 2006 (in two volumes) it sold more than a million copies.
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  49. underdocumented
    • 2009 March 8, Baz Dreisinger, “A Transracial Man”, New York Times:
      Copeland, like most slaves, is woefully underdocumented; we know that she somehow became literate, migrated to New York in the 1880s and found a job in domestic service.
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  50. unleafy
    • 2009 March 8, Mark Levine, “Share My Ride”, New York Times:
      Joe, who lives upstairs from me in a converted warehouse on a notably unleafy block of Park Slope, Brooklyn, is someone a love-struck marketer might regard as both demographically and “psychographically” ripe — endowed, that is, with both the means and the mind-set to wade fearlessly into the waters of certain Next Big Things.
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  51. unstrange
    • 2009 March 8, Baz Dreisinger, “A Transracial Man”, New York Times:
      What’s strange, then, is how very unstrange all this is: racial-passing stories are not historical oddities but strikingly familiar tales, long woven into the fabric of American life.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. bundt
    • 2009 2009-03-08, David Colman, “The Time Keeper”, New York Times, page 76:
      On his own blog, johnmayer.com/blog , he threw a “holiday (interfaith) baking contest,” where his bundt cake entry was buried in an avalanche of hilarious patisserie competitors.
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  2. fervant
    • 2009 March 8, Alessandra Stanley, “The Vanishing Sidekick”, New York Times:
      A real sidekick is something between a friend and a servant — a fervant.
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