User:Visviva/NYT 20090315

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2009-03-14) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2009-03-15
  • List status: open
→ Next (2009-03-16)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-03-15 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-15).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ] - [ This day's: ObserverToronto Star - Herald Sun ]

160440 tokens ‧ 118527 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12652 types ‧ 74 (~ 0.585%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-03-15[edit]

  1. bardlike
  2. basilico *
    • 2009 March 15, “Letters: Venice with the Family”, New York Times:
      On our next trip to Venice, our 10-year-old daughter was delighted with the spaghetti with pomodoro and basilico at the restaurant Dalla Marisa (a gem near the Fondamenta San Giobbe).
      add
  3. brayne
    • 2009 March 15, William Safire, “Animal Spirits”, New York Times:
      The animal spirite hath his seate in the brayne .
      add
  4. bromance
    • 2009 March 15, Dennis Lim, “Isn’t He Bromantic?”, New York Times:
      The movie, which opens Friday, fits squarely within the current vogue in American comedy for what sociologists would call homosocial intimacy and what MTV and trend-article writers have termed the bromance.
      add
  5. bycause
    • 2009 March 15, William Safire, “Animal Spirits”, New York Times:
      . called animal , bycause it is the first instrument of the soule, which the Latins call animam .”
      add
  6. classicizing
    • 2009 March 15, Christopher Gray, “The Lack of Resemblance Is Completely Intentional”, New York Times:
      In 1930, The Architectural Forum praised No. 895’s “delightful simplicity,” a conservative mix of traditional forms and modernism often now called classicizing Art Deco.
      add
  7. compulsories
    • 2009 March 15, Sophia Hollander, “T, Her Name Is Twindexane”, New York Times:
      Now we’ve got to work out the legs and practice compulsories.
      add
  8. coupelike
    • 2009 March 15, Lawrence Ulrich, “Memo to Mercedes: Please CC Me”, New York Times:
      And as yet another four-door trying to disguise its sedan roots under an arching coupelike roof — a ruse that Mercedes-Benz executes brilliantly with the CLS — the CC concept seemed to give off a whiff of a premium-label knockoff.
      add
  9. crewneck
    • 2009 March 15, Geoffrey Wolff, “Suburban Suffering”, New York Times:
      For a writer celebrated for his control of his characters’ inner lives, for a husband and father notoriously prickly about his expression of the suburban proprieties — the crewneck Shetland sweater and khakis, the plummy faux-Brahmin accent, the adoring Labrador at his feet, the woodpile neatly stacked and grass hand-scythed — here was scandal in full spate, sludge flooding over his family and friends.
      add
  10. disarrangement
    • 2009 March 15, William Safire, “Animal Spirits”, New York Times:
      In May 1930, he said, “We have been passing through one of those great economic storms which periodically bring hardship and suffering upon our people” and urged business and labor “to avoid accelerating the depression by the hardship and disarrangement of strikes and lockouts.”
      add
  11. exacta *
  12. fullery
    • 2009 March 15, Steve Coates, “Under the Volcano”, New York Times:
      . was a cloth-processing workshop, or fullery.
      add
  13. hegemonistic
    • 2009 March 15, Arthur Lubow, “The Loyalist”, New York Times:
      Western observers — including many in London, where Gergiev is the principal conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra — condemned Russia’s invasion of Georgia as a return to the hegemonistic ambitions of the Soviet Union.
      add
  14. herkie
  15. herkies
  16. homina
  17. hypemen
    • 2009 March 15, Virginia Heffernan, “Blood Sport”, New York Times:
      While pro football goes with expensive commercials, studio commentators and vast, mainstream audiences on Sundays and in prime time, Ultimate Fighting goes with deranged hypemen and exclusive, high-paying audiences late at night.
      add
  18. hypergentrification
    • 2009 March 15, Wm. Ferguson, “Where Is the New Brooklyn?”, New York Times:
      Brooklyn accumulated its hipness, he says, by avoiding the “gauche” sort of hypergentrification that overwhelmed SoHo — perhaps because it had so much further to come.
      add
  19. koanlike
  20. little bluestem
    • 2009 March 15, Michael Pollak, “Flowers on the Fringe”, New York Times:
      Ornamental grasses (all requiring sun), like Festuca glauca and little bluestem.
      add
  21. modillions
  22. muffinlike
    • 2009 March 15, Amanda Hesser, “1966: Maida Heatter’s Popovers”, New York Times:
      While the mixture is very similar to crepe batter, when you confine it to deep, narrow, muffinlike molds, the surface of the batter sets and the air is trapped, so that the pastry has nowhere to go but up and out, creating a gravity-defying bubble.
      add
  23. multidisc
    • 2009 March 15, Anthony Tommasini, “Do You Have Philip Glass in a Box?”, New York Times:
      Yet recording companies, especially classical ones, continue to churn out CDs, and not just single discs but multidisc boxed sets.
      add
  24. multifront
    • 2009 March 15, Thom Shanker, “Pentagon Rethinking Old Doctrine on 2 Wars”, New York Times:
      Thomas Donnelly, a defense policy expert with the conservative American Enterprise Institute , said he believed that the Obama administration would be seeking to come up with “a multiwar, multioperation, multifront, walk-and-chew-gum construct.”
      add
  25. multioperation
    • 2009 March 15, Thom Shanker, “Pentagon Rethinking Old Doctrine on 2 Wars”, New York Times:
      Thomas Donnelly, a defense policy expert with the conservative American Enterprise Institute , said he believed that the Obama administration would be seeking to come up with “a multiwar, multioperation, multifront, walk-and-chew-gum construct.”
      add
  26. multipayer
    • 2009 March 15, “How to Pay Less for More Health Care”, New York Times:
      But any plan that retains the private, multipayer insurance system that is the source of our out-of-control costs cannot possibly work.
      add
  27. multistranded
    • 2009 March 15, Mike Hale, “Cracker: Clever, Arrogant, Plump and Enduring”, New York Times:
      A domestic renaissance was near with the rise of “NYPD Blue” and “Law & Order,” but the British shows had already established a template — brutal, sometimes unresolved stories; elliptical, multistranded narratives; tortured heroes — that would be imitated frequently but rarely improved on.
      add
  28. multiwar
    • 2009 March 15, Thom Shanker, “Pentagon Rethinking Old Doctrine on 2 Wars”, New York Times:
      Thomas Donnelly, a defense policy expert with the conservative American Enterprise Institute , said he believed that the Obama administration would be seeking to come up with “a multiwar, multioperation, multifront, walk-and-chew-gum construct.”
      add
  29. neoeverything
    • 2009 March 15, James Traub, “The Academic Freedom Agenda”, New York Times:
      The day after Obama’s inauguration , the lawns of Highland Park’s neoeverything palazzi were festooned with signs reading, “Welcome Home, George and Laura,” and bearing an image of the flag of Texas.
      add
  30. nonjokey
    • 2009 March 15, Rob Walker, “Funny Business”, New York Times:
      And of course he maintains that there is in fact a real and nonjokey message: “If you think about it, why wouldn’t a blanket have sleeves?”
      add
  31. nonrecruiting
  32. nonscoundrel
    • 2009 March 15, Randy Cohen, “Painted Into a Corner”, New York Times:
      Perhaps the question is not should you risk your job but rather how quickly can you find a new one with a nonscoundrel boss.
      add
  33. overbeat
  34. overswing
    • 2009 March 15, Greg Hanlon, “Meet Gar Ryness, the Batting Stance Guy”, New York Times:
      He cited as historical examples Dave Winfield’s overswing and the way Lenny Dykstra’s fingers “flutter as he pushes the bat forward.”
      add
  35. overutilization
    • 2009 March 15, “How to Pay Less for More Health Care”, New York Times:
      Anyone who practices clinical medicine knows that unnecessary health care expenditure is partly due to “defensive” medicine, which leads to overutilization of medical tests and procedures.
      add
  36. peacocking
    • 2009 March 15, Jon Caramanica, “Street Swagger and Wistful Strains of High Lonesome”, New York Times:
      On the mixtape “So Far Gone,” the Toronto rapper Drake follows Mr. West’s cues to a tee: singing in a chilly, digital coo, and rapping at the intersection of modesty and peacocking.
      add
  37. peatier
    • 2009 March 15, Jonathan Miles, “Wear the Green but Don’t Drink It”, New York Times:
      Like its peatier cousin, Scotch , it tends to be a curmudgeonly loner, preferring the company of just ice and a bit of water.
      add
  38. pheochromocytoma
    • 2009 March 15, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “Mysterious Psychosis”, New York Times:
      Or could the patient have a pheochromocytoma — a rare tumor that causes the adrenal gland to produce too much of its namesake hormone — adrenaline.
      add
  39. pheochromocytomas
    • 2009 March 15, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “Mysterious Psychosis”, New York Times:
      Cosgrove found several papers describing patients who, like this woman, had pheochromocytomas as well as mania and psychosis.
      add
  40. pictographic
    • 2009 March 15, Robert Peele, “The Artists, the Cars”, New York Times:
      The German artist covered his car with pictographic images and symbols in a design that evokes primitive cave paintings.
      add
  41. pomodoro *
    • 2009 March 15, “Letters: Venice with the Family”, New York Times:
      On our next trip to Venice, our 10-year-old daughter was delighted with the spaghetti with pomodoro and basilico at the restaurant Dalla Marisa (a gem near the Fondamenta San Giobbe).
      add
  42. precrash
    • 2009 March 15, Jonathan Mahler, “After the Bubble”, New York Times:
      The “greed is good,” precrash 1980s brought another real estate boom to New York, though one with a limited impact on the physical appearance of the city.
      add
  43. reascendance
    • 2009 March 15, “Newt. Again.”, New York Times:
      An article on March 1 about Newt Gingrich and his reascendance in the Republican Party misidentified the building in Washington where the Ways and Means Committee was marking up the Democratic stimulus bill in January and where the writer interviewed Eric Cantor, the Republican whip.
      add
  44. reimagination
    • 2009 March 15, Jon Caramanica, “Street Swagger and Wistful Strains of High Lonesome”, New York Times:
      There’s “A Night Off,” a woozy collaboration with the tender R&B singer Lloyd; an astral reimagination of “Little Bit” by the Swedish indie pippin Lykke Li; and on “November 18th” a tribute to DJ Screw, the pioneer of Houston’s chopped-and-screwed rap, who died in 2000.
      add
  45. seate
    • 2009 March 15, William Safire, “Animal Spirits”, New York Times:
      The animal spirite hath his seate in the brayne .
      add
  46. semifrozen
  47. semiprosperous
    • 2009 March 15, James Traub, “The Bad Old Days”, New York Times:
      Yet Vietnam is a stable auto­cracy experiencing rapid growth, and Thailand is a shaky and semiprosperous democracy.
      add
  48. sewerless
    • 2009 March 15, Steve Coates, “Under the Volcano”, New York Times:
      She walks down the sewerless town’s streets (“a smelly mixture of animal dung, .
      add
  49. slumpy
    • 2009 March 15, Rob Walker, “Funny Business”, New York Times:
      If slumpy economic stretches have included silly fads before, this may be the first time it has happened in the era of the mainstream Web, where Snuggie advertising inspired an immediate wave of YouTube parodies and jokey Facebook groups.
      add
  50. spirite *
    • 2009 March 15, William Safire, “Animal Spirits”, New York Times:
      The animal spirite hath his seate in the brayne .
      add
  51. stagelets
    • 2009 March 15, Jim Lewis, “New Glass City”, New York Times:
      The slightest shift in the angle of sun fall can hide or reveal entire worlds, and as evening comes the city gradually turns itself inside out — the streets go dark and the buildings open up, offering their rooms like stagelets upon which our little lives are played.
      add
  52. streetside
    • 2009 March 15, Sam Dagher, “In Hard-Bitten Baghdad, Tough Tactics on Strays”, New York Times:
      The first stop was a parking lot in front of a tire repair shop and a streetside butcher stand, where dogs tend to gather, drawn by the tempting discarded innards of sheep.
      add
  53. tankless
  54. thre
    • 2009 March 15, William Safire, “Animal Spirits”, New York Times:
      “Physitions teache that there ben thre kindes of spirites,” wrote Bartholomew Traheron in his 1543 translation of a text on surgery, “ animal, vital, and naturall .
      add
  55. tradeswomanly
    • 2009 March 15, Geoffrey Wolff, “Suburban Suffering”, New York Times:
      Everything about this enterprise — the doilies and potholders, China kittens and Toby jugs, his mother’s tradeswomanly exchanges with her customers, the breadwinner’s power she lorded over her unemployed husband — humiliated John Cheever, to whom Bailey ascribes the conviction that his parents were “poor and outcast” not owing to their bad luck or indifference to material success, but “because they were, at bottom, strange and vulgar people.”
      add
  56. underemphasis
    • 2009 March 15, Kelley Holland, “Is It Time to Retrain B-Schools?”, New York Times:
      The schools suffer from “an overemphasis on the rigor and an underemphasis on relevance,” he said.
      add
  57. unpeaceful
    • 2009 March 15, “The War Widow”, New York Times:
      Your new book, “My Hope for Peace,” comes at a sadly unpeaceful moment.
      add
  58. unsentimentality
    • 2009 March 15, Julie Just, “Children’s Bookshelf”, New York Times:
      From his uncool Korean parents with their “legitimately tragic childhoods” to the angry little kids next door (“a barrage of iceballs arc overhead like grenades”), Albert views growing up with all the comic sweetness and unsentimentality it deserves.
      add
  59. unverbalized
    • 2009 March 15, Dave Kehr, “Buried Treasures From Japanese Vaults”, New York Times:
      In the back of the bus a village girl sits with her mother, who is taking her to Tokyo to be sold into prostitution; the driver’s developing sympathy for her plight forms the film’s main, and largely unverbalized, plotline.
      add
  60. weddinggoers
    • 2009 March 15, Marianne Rohrlich, “Wedding Bells’ Toll”, New York Times:
      Etiquette experts and style-makers have helpful tips for how weddinggoers can buy impressive — yet affordable — gifts.
      add
  61. wintercreeper
    • 2009 March 15, Michael Pollak, “Flowers on the Fringe”, New York Times:
      Ground cover: sedum (sun); lily turf (sun/shade); wintercreeper (sun/shade).
      add
  62. yakkers
    • 2009 March 15, Harvey Araton, “Classic a Reminder That National Ties Are Unwavering”, New York Times:
      I’ve heard some sports radio yakkers dismiss the Classic as a contrived exhibition, while the Yankees, who believe all global marketing of the game ought to begin and end with them, chafed when the Dominicans Robinson Canó and Dámaso Marte returned from the Classic with minor injuries.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. whiffle