User:Visviva/NYT 20090322

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-03-22 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-22).

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108517 tokens ‧ 80031 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 10656 types ‧ 86 (~ 0.807%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-03-22[edit]

  1. antiglobalist
    • 2009 March 22, Gary Hart, “Just Another Word”, New York Times:
      Though shunning antiglobalist window smashing, he concludes that “the heyday of American liberalism’s commitment to an open global economy .
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  2. aperitivi *
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Jackie Cooperman, “Italian Renaissance”, New York Times, page 36:
      The restaurant/lounge at this recently restored villa and gardens is one of the cognoscenti’s latest hangouts, where Umberto Montano’s seafood is almost as big a draw as aperitivi on the terrace.
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  3. authentocrats
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Christine Muhlke, “Kitchen Island”, New York Times, page 54:
      Now, however, the island is gaining a certain culinary cachet, as authentocrats from all over discover that chefs here have always adhered to the locavore edict of cooking traditional dishes using local and seasonal ingredients.
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  4. ballhandling
    • 2009 March 22, Michael Sokolove, “Allonzo Trier Is in the Game”, New York Times:
      After about 10 minutes of ballhandling at the gym, he moved on to what makes up the bulk of his daily workout — shooting.
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  5. bentgrass
    • 2009 March 22, John Branch, “A Patch of Green: Yankees Grass Is Now a Brand”, New York Times:
      Mr. DeLea, an unassuming man who oversees a 13-farm sod empire with the help of a helicopter he pilots, supplies various varieties of turf, from bluegrass to bentgrass, to clients that include well-known golf courses and small municipalities.
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  6. bergsteigeressen
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Wray, “The Royal Wee”, New York Times, page 96:
      I sat down and ordered the bergsteigeressen, which perfectly illustrates Liechtenstein’s position at the navel of Europe: penne from Italy, sausage from Bavaria, speck from Austria, cheese from Switzerland and zucchini from the proprietor’s own garden in Vaduz.
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  7. bijoux *
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Sandra Ballentine, “In- Store / Simple Gifts”, New York Times, page 30:
      These blue topaz earrings ($68) are from Percent Jewelry, a line of bijoux designed by the retailer’s husband, Tom, and handcrafted by Chinese artisans using traditional techniques.
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  8. biomorphism
  9. blacklistee
    • 2009 March 22, J. Hoberman, “An Expatriate at Home Among Stark Images”, New York Times:
      “Rififi” successfully transposed American noir to France, while “He Who Must Die,” a robust adaptation of Kazantzakis’s “Greek Passion” by Dassin and a fellow blacklistee, Ben Barzman, suggests a militant version of John Ford ’s “Grapes of Wrath.”
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  10. blinis
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Armand Limnander, “Peaked Interests”, New York Times, page 18:
      Miller heads to the Butcher’s Block (424 South Spring Street; 970-925-7554) to pick up salmon, blinis and other pantry essentials.
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  11. brebis *
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Christine Muhlke, “Kitchen Island”, New York Times, page 54:
      Spurr also sent me to A Pasturella in the hilltop hamlet of Monticello, where a flaky beggar’s purse stuffed with local brebis cheese and mint was a revelation.
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  12. chaffing
    • 2009 March 22, Philip Galanes, “You’ve Got Next”, New York Times:
      Your request will likely add a chaffing discomfort to Mr. Filthy Rich’s swagger, and may prompt him to dial it back.
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  13. charcutier *
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Christine Muhlke, “Kitchen Island”, New York Times, page 54:
      Campinchi and his wife go out of their way to get their ingredients from small producers all over the island, such as the incredible charcutier Antoine Marcaggi, who lives in a mountain village a couple of hours’ drive away.
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  14. charcutourist
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Christine Muhlke, “Kitchen Island”, New York Times, page 54:
      I’m sure I am not the first charcutourist to come to Corsica with an extra suitcase for sausage.
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  15. chartlike
    • 2009 March 22, Carol Kino, “No Longer Racing at the Speed of Art”, New York Times:
      According to Mr. Saul, when Mr. Parker arrived in Austin, he brought his chartlike painting concept with him.
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  16. cooingly
    • 2009 March 22, Deborah Sontag, “The Alpha Males of ‘Carnage’”, New York Times:
      Unlike Mr. Daniels, Ms. Harden had previously encountered Mr. Gandolfini, whom she almost cooingly described as soulful.
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  17. dosas
    • 2009 2009-03-22, “Global Tables”, New York Times, page 72:
      This is chain food with a difference: fast, fresh and flavorful South Indian cooking, including steaming idli buns, dosas in a mind-boggling array of flavors and all-you-can-eat thali meals.
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  18. downslide
    • 2009 March 22, Michael Winerip, “He Has Both Sides Covered”, New York Times:
      By the time Mr. Hanke took over, the paper was on a downslide, known for slanting the news to support Republicans.
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  19. elucidatory
    • 2009 March 22, Gary Hart, “Just Another Word”, New York Times:
      Wolfe’s style is elucidatory rather than polemical.
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  20. fini *
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Christine Muhlke, “Kitchen Island”, New York Times, page 54:
      She shot me a look of utter incredulity: “But the sausage is fini for the season.”
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  21. flatties
    • 2009 March 22, Sam Sifton, “Baja Refresher”, New York Times:
      Out in the cold waters off Montauk, the cod bite is on and the flatties are coming soon: big doormat flounder caught on hooks and line.
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  22. gladiatoresque
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Karla M. Martinez, “Sophisticated Traveler”, New York Times, page 14:
      Discreet elastic loops secure the interchangeable straps, which run from gemstone-encrusted to gladiatoresque, and make that weekend beach bag a lot lighter.
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  23. grammanatics
    • 2009 March 22, William Safire, “Fulsome”, New York Times:
      Because they are not privy to President Obama ’s BlackBerry number, and because they can find my e-mail address printed invitingly at the bottom of this column, the legion of grammanatics — those stern prescriptivists living in syntax who make up the Gotcha!
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  24. hammour
    • 2009 2009-03-22, “Global Tables”, New York Times, page 72:
      AL HADHEERAH Come for local dishes like haree (wheat and chicken porridge), majboo (slow-roast lamb with barberry and pine-nut rice) and grilled hammour fish.
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  25. haree
    • 2009 2009-03-22, “Global Tables”, New York Times, page 72:
      AL HADHEERAH Come for local dishes like haree (wheat and chicken porridge), majboo (slow-roast lamb with barberry and pine-nut rice) and grilled hammour fish.
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  26. hirschwurst
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Wray, “The Royal Wee”, New York Times, page 96:
      Over a delicious plate of hirschwurst (venison sausage) and horseradish cream, we talked, as best we could, about how the principality had changed over the years.
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  27. hulky
    • 2009 March 22, Susanna Hamner, “Harley, You’re Not Getting Any Younger”, New York Times:
      After riding high for two decades, the company that makes the hulky bikes that devoted riders affectionately call Hogs is sputtering.
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  28. imperativism
    • 2009 March 22, William Safire, “Fulsome”, New York Times:
      Look (to use an imperativism favored by Obama as a sentence opener): Never use a word sure to sow confusion.
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  29. inauguree
    • 2009 March 22, William Safire, “Fulsome”, New York Times:
      The inauguree: George H. W. Bush .
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  30. jokiness
    • 2009 March 22, Daniel Handler, “Manic Oppression”, New York Times:
      There is Robison’s acrimonious, chatty hero, with her compulsive jokiness (“The air-conditioner is working, but not very hard”) and relentless self-criticism (“ ‘So, how’ve you been?
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  31. majboo
    • 2009 2009-03-22, “Global Tables”, New York Times, page 72:
      AL HADHEERAH Come for local dishes like haree (wheat and chicken porridge), majboo (slow-roast lamb with barberry and pine-nut rice) and grilled hammour fish.
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  32. mankousheh
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Warren Singh-Bartlett, “Gulf Swing”, New York Times, page 67:
      Grab a cheese or thyme mankousheh (flat bread) for breakfast at the Al Reef bakery.
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  33. moutabbal
    • 2009 2009-03-22, “Global Tables”, New York Times, page 72:
      ZYARA The cooks at this dusty, artifact-filled cafe turn out a mean zesty lentil soup called moutabbal, and their sour-sweet fattoush salad tastes better than homemade.
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  34. noncontingent
    • 2009 March 22, Vivian S. Toy, “Up in Smoke: The Deposit Vanishes”, New York Times:
      These are their options, because until late last year, virtually all developers required buyers to sign noncontingent contracts committing the buyers to the property regardless of whether they could get financing.
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  35. nondistressed
    • 2009 March 22, Gretchen Morgenson, “Red Flags That Muni Investors Can’t See”, New York Times:
      Mr. Schmitt found that an alarming number of these beleaguered issuers’ securities were purchased by individual investors at nondistressed prices — 100 cents on the dollar (known as par value) or higher.
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  36. nonfish
    • 2009 March 22, Paul Greenberg, “Cat Got Your Fish?”, New York Times:
      Indeed, the Obama administration, in search of “shovel ready” projects for the forthcoming stimulus package, would be well advised to consider programs like the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s research initiative to develop fish meal and oil substitutes from algae, agricultural byproducts and other nonfish sources.
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  37. paddleball
    • 2009 March 22, Brooks Barnes, “The Creatures That Jumped Off the Screen”, New York Times:
      Most of that pow was tooled back — B.O.B.’s lone eyeball no longer rolls out into the audience, and debris from explosions doesn’t land in the front row — but they kept one at the beginning of the movie: a paddleball sequence.
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  38. paperwhites
  39. phrasedickensian
    • 2009 March 22, William Safire, “Fulsome”, New York Times:
      A confidential, phrasedickensian source whose identity I will protect if it costs me 84 days in journalist jail for contempt (we really need that federal shield law) has “refreshed my recollection,” as the prosecutors say.
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  40. plumerias
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Bowe, “How Green Is My Bali”, New York Times, page 80:
      Orchids, pandanus, gold plumerias, bougainvillea and gardenias glow along mossy passageways in the morning sunlight as servants flutter, placing offerings of food and wafting incense in every statue nook.
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  41. postidentity
    • 2009 March 22, Karen Rosenberg, “East in the Eye of This Beholder”, New York Times:
      Much has changed since Said laid out his theory of Orientalism: globalization, jihad, identity and postidentity politics; new museums in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; and wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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  42. predestinarian
    • 2009 March 22, Gary Hart, “Just Another Word”, New York Times:
      Having rejected Rousseau’s nature in favor of Kant’s culture (what Wolfe calls “artifice”) as the basis of liberal thought, he then points out that both Calvinism (or fundamentalist Christianity) and modern evolutionary theory (atheistic Darwinism) are predestinarian enemies of liberal self-determination; that neither socialism on the one hand nor the ruthless markets of Friedrich Hayek and Milton Friedman on the other guarantee any degree of equality of opportunity; that militarism’s roots in Romanticism produce today’s neoconservatism, itself a reaction against the perceived failure of cold war liberalism; that both traditional liberals and conservatives are guilty of a concentration of power that threatens freedom.
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  43. prescriptiveness
    • 2009 March 22, William Safire, “Fulsome”, New York Times:
      Count a bunch of my correspondents as members of the “some”; the same princes of prescriptiveness who retch at the abuse of fulsome do not minimize the stripping of horrific puissance from enormity .
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  44. pseudodemocracies
    • 2009 March 22, Kenneth Roth, “Ballots and Bullets”, New York Times:
      It has long been an article of faith that these pseudodemocracies are inherently unstable.
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  45. razored
    • 2009 March 22, Daniel Handler, “Manic Oppression”, New York Times:
      “One D.O.A., One on the Way” has all the razored style and zigzag tone one expects, but also a new connection to a bigger world, in which all of our circumstances are as desperate and hilarious as her characters’.
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  46. rupiahs
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Bowe, “How Green Is My Bali”, New York Times, page 80:
      He pointed to a plot of land that just sold for 500 million rupiahs (about $42,000).
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  47. snatchable
    • 2009 2009-03-22, “Sleeper Hits”, New York Times, page 22:
      Perks Seamless service and highly snatchable Blaise Mautin toiletries.
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  48. sociologizing
    • 2009 March 22, Gary Hart, “Just Another Word”, New York Times:
      After all the sociologizing about family tradition, geography, religion, economic status, blue and red states, and clan influence, perhaps Gilbert and Sullivan came closest: “I often think it’s comical / How Nature always does contrive / That every boy and every gal / That’s born into the world alive / Is either a little Liberal / Or else a little ­Conservative!”
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  49. stamperln
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Wray, “The Royal Wee”, New York Times, page 96:
      The storm clouds had passed by the time we’d finished our meal, and the evening sun shone down on the Pfälzerhütte with just enough warmth — with the help of a few stamperln of schnapps — to keep us comfortable.
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  50. superattractive
    • 2009 March 22, “Kristen Kirkland and Bill Sherman”, New York Times:
      The couple met after they were hired at a new club called Mo Pitkin’s in the East Village in September 2005. Mr. Sherman was the manager, and after first noticing her he said he quickly inquired, “Who is the superattractive woman behind the bar?”
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  51. surfy
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Bowe, “How Green Is My Bali”, New York Times, page 80:
      For Seekers Of the “real Bali,” as opposed to the party Bali or the surfy Bali, the inland town of Ubud remains the acme of Balinese culture.
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  52. switchyard
    • 2009 March 22, Dave Kehr, “On the William Wellman Depression Express”, New York Times:
      Recently freed from the constraints of studio-bound early-sound technology, Wellman seems almost giddy with the possibilities of location shooting, moving his camera with abandon, staging dialogue scenes atop moving trains, constructing at least one live sound set (a greasy spoon where the waitress is a young Joan Blondell ) in the middle of a busy switchyard, where freight trains rumble past.
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  53. thali
    • 2009 2009-03-22, “Global Tables”, New York Times, page 72:
      This is chain food with a difference: fast, fresh and flavorful South Indian cooking, including steaming idli buns, dosas in a mind-boggling array of flavors and all-you-can-eat thali meals.
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  54. tolars
    • 2009 March 22, Hilary Howard, “Datebook: Events in Melbourne, Prague and Nashville”, New York Times:
      Admission is free, while food, drinks and merchandise can be purchased with the festival currency, called tolars, which cost 40 korunas each, about $1.90 at 21.4 korunas to the dollar.
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  55. tortelli *
    • 2009 March 22, “A Corridor of Note”, New York Times:
      The restaurant offers a three-course, $35 prix fixe dinner menu with entree selections of local brook trout; potato gnocchi; slow-roasted chicken breast; or chocolate sweet potato tortelli.
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  56. unfakeable
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Bowe, “How Green Is My Bali”, New York Times, page 80:
      What happens when the precise, unfakeable genius of a place, derived from inner meanings and personal habits, becomes an offering to and for the tourist?
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  57. unfestive
    • 2009 March 22, Rob Walker, “S.U.V. and Sympathy”, New York Times:
      One of these decidedly unfestive spots ran during the Super Bowl .
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  58. unhokily
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Christine Muhlke, “Kitchen Island”, New York Times, page 54:
      My search for la vraie cuisine corse — more beans, fewer whistles — also took me to a pair of epicurean temples on opposite ends of the 114-mile-long island that unhokily showcase peasant food.
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  59. warungs
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Bowe, “How Green Is My Bali”, New York Times, page 80:
      And of Mozaic Restaurant, an absolutely trumped-up Wine Spectator/Grandes Tables du Monde affair where tabs can run up to $100 or more that served food far less interesting and tasty than the $1.50 plates of nasi campur at the local restaurants called warungs.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. tjokorda
    • 2009 2009-03-22, John Bowe, “How Green Is My Bali”, New York Times, page 80:
      My host’s name is Tjokorda Gde Putra A. A. Sukawati, tjokorda being an honorific like raja or prince used by members of the royal caste.
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  2. wordly
    • 2009 2009-03-22, Alex Hawgood, “Profile in Style Rossita Missoni”, New York Times, page 92:
      Fittingly, her house serves as the unofficial headquarters of the Missoni clan as well as a de facto museum of wordly treasures.
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