User:Visviva/NYT 20090329

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-03-29 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-03-29).

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160518 tokens ‧ 118069 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12307 types ‧ 64 (~ 0.52%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-03-29[edit]

  1. amours *
    • 2009 March 29, Caleb Crain, “Brother, Can You Spare a Room?”, New York Times:
      He remembers that the lodgers of the Dirty Boardinghouse mounted to its roof on summer nights, from which vantage they interrupted the amours of local cats with gunfire.
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  2. bedless
  3. bihemisphered
    • 2009 March 29, Francine Du Plessix Gray, “My Father, Your Father”, New York Times:
      (At one point, she describes her extended family as “a bicameral group to match the bihemisphered world we traveled after the split.”)
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  4. borlotti *
    • 2009 March 29, Ann Farmer, “Manna From Heaven? No, Try Brooklyn Instead”, New York Times:
      Goldie Greenberg, 66, who works as a home attendant, was filling her cart at the food pantry last Wednesday with cans of borlotti beans, spinach and hummus, which she described as a “good nosh.” Ms. Greenberg said she did not make enough money to afford to keep kosher.
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  5. buscones
    • 2009 March 29, John Anderson, “A Ballplayer, Seeks a Hit, a Hit Film”, New York Times:
      But the high-profile departures have spotlighted the unsavory practices of local talent brokers known as buscones, who sign players as young as 10.
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  6. cacher *
    • 2009 March 29, Virginia Heffernan, “G.P.S. Marks the Spot”, New York Times:
      Paul Sookiasian, a recent college graduate who lives in Pennsylvania, has become an ardent cacher in the past year.
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  7. cachers
    • 2009 March 29, Virginia Heffernan, “G.P.S. Marks the Spot”, New York Times:
      Of “World War II — Austin,” which turns out to lead cachers to a war memorial, a poster named Sumbirdy wrote, “We enjoy virtual caches,” and then, “Thank goodness for the oldies!”)
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  8. cellini
  9. chestnutlike
    • 2009 March 29, Christine Muhlke, “Bean Counterculture”, New York Times:
      The beans that Sando started growing were beautiful; cooked, they could be creamy, meaty, chestnutlike or herbaceous-tasting, textures and flavors he’d never experienced.
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  10. coffinlike
    • 2009 March 29, Christopher Gray, “Mr. Houdini, Your Box Is Ready”, New York Times:
      In 1926 the escape artist Harry Houdini was lowered to the bottom in an airtight coffinlike case, equipped with a telephone in case of trouble.
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  11. cungapump
    • 2009 March 29, Peter Applebome, “Line by Line, Poets Capture the Immigrant Story, New Jersey Style”, New York Times:
      And if you came at the right time, you might have found Gretna Wilkinson, an energetic woman born in Guyana, declaiming like a soul on fire under the vaulted beams of the main room about saltfish and hot cungapump tea, Marvin Gaye and how Genesis caused Exodus:
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  12. cureless
    • 2009 March 29, Edmund White, “Hard Times”, New York Times:
      But the wordless, exposed sensation overwhelming her was that her father wasn’t quite a person, not really, but a private part of her, a curse of pinkness and squatness and cureless vulnerability that was Jacey’s right alone to keep hidden from the world.”
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  13. custardlike
    • 2009 March 29, Patrick Mcgeehan, “Two Brooklyn Parks, Entering Stage Left”, New York Times:
      Mr. Hampton and the cast deliberated at length about Americanizing the custardlike French dessert around which some of the interplay revolves, perhaps making it a cobbler, Ms. Harden said.
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  14. deathmaster
    • 2009 March 29, Brad Leithauser, “Family Feuds”, New York Times:
      Some of these prove quite effective (“a certain manminded woman,” “Time stood like a deathmaster over me”), but others sound whimsical and look cumbersome (“griefremembering,” “allenveloping”).
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  15. dogwise
    • 2009 March 29, Brad Leithauser, “Family Feuds”, New York Times:
      What’s lost in this combination of metrical mellifluousness and clunkiness (elbowed dogwise?) is any sense of genuine exasperation.
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  16. falterings
    • 2009 March 29, Barry Unsworth, “Never Far From Despair”, New York Times:
      But it is the doubt thrown on the prospect of arrival, the falterings of purpose and belief, the renewals of hope that give the novel its drive and energy.
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  17. folklife
    • 2009 March 29, William Grimes, “Archie Green, 91, Union Activist and Folklorist, Dies”, New York Times:
      Mr. Green wrote for academic publications like The Journal of American Folklore, but starting in the late 1960s he spent much of his time lobbying Congress for the folklife center, dressed in a T-shirt and sneakers.
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  18. funmobiles
  19. geothermals
  20. gossipmonger
    • 2009 March 29, John Metcalfe, “The Celebrity Twitter Ecosystem”, New York Times:
      “I love it when they don’t talk with their publicists before posting things,” said Mario Lavandeira , who is better known as the gossipmonger Perez Hilton, “like Solange Knowles talking about how she was taking a lot of Nyquil and then ended up passing out at the airport.”
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  21. greenkeeper
  22. hokeypokey
    • 2009 March 29, Caleb Crain, “Brother, Can You Spare a Room?”, New York Times:
      At the Theatrical Boardinghouse he once participated in an incremental, acrobatic singalong game — a sort of 19th-century hokeypokey — at 2 in the morning.
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  23. laborlore
    • 2009 March 29, William Grimes, “Archie Green, 91, Union Activist and Folklorist, Dies”, New York Times:
      Returning to college at 40, he began studying what he called laborlore: the work songs, slang, craft techniques and tales that helped to define the trade unions and create a sense of group identity.
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  24. luddite *
    • 2009 March 29, Virginia Heffernan, “G.P.S. Marks the Spot”, New York Times:
      It has a number of advantages over dowsing or other luddite methods for finding hidden stuff.
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  25. manminded
    • 2009 March 29, Brad Leithauser, “Family Feuds”, New York Times:
      Some of these prove quite effective (“a certain manminded woman,” “Time stood like a deathmaster over me”), but others sound whimsical and look cumbersome (“griefremembering,” “allenveloping”).
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  26. methomyl
    • 2009 March 29, Sean D. Hamill, “Trying to Limit Disclosure on Explosion”, New York Times:
      Methyl isocyanate, a chemical used in the production of carbamate pesticides, was not directly involved in the August explosion, which the company has said was caused by human error in a unit that contained the less toxic chemical methomyl.
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  27. microfocus
    • 2009 March 29, Adam Lebor, “Justice of the Peace”, New York Times:
      The book’s microfocus on her political battles also means it lacks sufficient geo­political context.
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  28. midplay
    • 2009 March 29, Pat Jordan, “Neil LaBute Has a Thing About Beauty”, New York Times:
      LaBute’s plays are, in fact, so provocative that some past audience members have walked out midplay or screamed out “kill the playwright” or slapped an actor’s face after a performance.
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  29. miniwagon
    • 2009 March 29, Keith Martin, “Fun by Almost Any Measure”, New York Times:
      In fact, thanks to the addition of the Clubman miniwagon, Mini bucked the industry’s nosedive in 2008 with a sales increase of 29 percent.
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  30. multidivisional
    • 2009 March 29, Steve Lohr, “How Crisis Shapes the Corporate Model”, New York Times:
      The main development, they note, was the rise of the modern multidivisional enterprise like General Electric , DuPont and General Motors .
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  31. multiplicatively
    • 2009 March 29, Thomas L. Friedman, “Mother Nature’s Dow”, New York Times:
      [But,] rather than interacting additively, these different effects appear to interact multiplicatively, with feedbacks among the contributing factors, leading to the surprisingly large increase in the chance of much higher temperatures.”
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  32. multirotational
  33. noncooks
    • 2009 March 29, Christine Muhlke, “Bean Counterculture”, New York Times:
      But with Sando as their “bean friend,” even noncooks have learned the nuanced pleasures of a simple pot of beans.
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  34. nongoalkeeper
    • 2009 March 29, Paul Oberjuerge, “U.S. Grabs Late Goals and Tie in El Salvador”, New York Times:
      MILESTONE FOR BECKHAM David Beckham broke England’s appearance record for a nongoalkeeper and set up goal with a trademark cross in a 4-0 exhibition victory over Slovakia at Wembley.
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  35. nonlife
  36. nonlosing
  37. nontitle
    • 2009 March 29, “Blood Sport”, New York Times:
      The longest title and nontitle matches are allowed 25 and 15 minutes, respectively.
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  38. paczki
    • 2009 March 29, Paul Clemens, “Lean Tuesday”, New York Times:
      Fat Tuesday is our Mardi Gras, a sort of Polish St. Patrick’s Day , with Hamtramck­ in place of the French Quarter and paczki (pronounced POONCH-kee) in place of green beer.
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  39. polychromed
    • 2009 March 29, Christopher Gray, “Mr. Houdini, Your Box Is Ready”, New York Times:
      A high gallery ran around the basement pool, which was decorated with polychromed tile.
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  40. posthurricane
  41. prelunch
    • 2009 March 29, Mark Leibovich, “Speaking Freely, Biden Finds Influential Role”, New York Times:
      “The dietary bar is set by the president,” said Ron Klain , Mr. Biden’s chief of staff, who recently fielded a prelunch query from the White House kitchen about whether Mr. Biden wanted sour cream with his tacos (he did).
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  42. rehidden
    • 2009 March 29, Virginia Heffernan, “G.P.S. Marks the Spot”, New York Times:
      The cache, according to the entry on the site, was first hidden in 2002 and last found — since in geocaching everything is hidden, found and rehidden — a week ago.
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  43. saltfish
    • 2009 March 29, Peter Applebome, “Line by Line, Poets Capture the Immigrant Story, New Jersey Style”, New York Times:
      And if you came at the right time, you might have found Gretna Wilkinson, an energetic woman born in Guyana, declaiming like a soul on fire under the vaulted beams of the main room about saltfish and hot cungapump tea, Marvin Gaye and how Genesis caused Exodus:
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  44. scaups
  45. signless
  46. speakability
    • 2009 March 29, Brad Leithauser, “Family Feuds”, New York Times:
      Why, if speakability is Carson’s aim, would she have one of her characters declare, “Look at him, look how he drips unhealth — shudder object!”
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  47. supercheap
    • 2009 March 29, David Segal, “Don’t Come Crying to This Airline”, New York Times:
      Spirit’s specialty is the supercheap ticket from a major American city to vacation spots like Jamaica, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, and it’s ideal for people spontaneous enough to jump on last-minute sales, sometimes for tickets that cost as little as $9, one way.
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  48. superclear
  49. trifold
  50. unasterisked
    • 2009 March 29, Bill Scheft, “He’s Huge in Britain”, New York Times:
      Among those people, places and things left unasterisked: Peter Sut­cliffe, Dot Cotton, Del Boy, Bagpuss, David Walliams, Roy Keane and Rod Hull.
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  51. uncashed
    • 2009 March 29, Peter Galison, “Sons of Atom”, New York Times:
      He had the sympathy of Einstein and Richard Feynman but somehow always orbited outside the action — his work, Wolfgang Pauli once said, like an uncashed check.
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  52. uncurbed
    • 2009 March 29, John F. Burns, “Anglo-American Capitalism on Trial”, New York Times:
      Partly because of the heavy burden of government debt built up during his stewardship, and the uncurbed recklessness of the country’s banks, Britain’s recession is already the harshest in Western Europe.
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  53. villagelike

Sequestered[edit]

  1. crimsoncovered
    • 2009 March 29, Brad Leithauser, “Family Feuds”, New York Times:
      When Carson has Clytemnestra declare, “Make his path crimsoncovered! purplepaved! redsaturated!” the reader naturally replies, “Fuhgeddaboutit.”
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  2. purplepaved
    • 2009 March 29, Brad Leithauser, “Family Feuds”, New York Times:
      When Carson has Clytemnestra declare, “Make his path crimsoncovered! purplepaved! redsaturated!” the reader naturally replies, “Fuhgeddaboutit.”
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  3. sinde
    • 2009 March 29, John F. Burns, “Anglo-American Capitalism on Trial”, New York Times:
      The Brown government has committed tens of billions to the recapitalization of Britain’s banks and a raft of stimulus measures, pushing its budget deficit to levels unknown sinde World War II without any sign yet that the economy’s plunge has been slowed.
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