User:Visviva/NYT 20090424

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-04-24 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-08-19).

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85046 tokens ‧ 61280 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8228 types ‧ 21 (~ 0.255%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-04-24[edit]

  1. dividedness
    • 2009 April 24, Michiko Kakutani, “Lots of Contradictions in Birthin’ That Movie”, New York Times:
      “The intensely personal energy of this dividedness, the deep-down tension in Mitchell, Selznick and Leigh between vulgarity and refinement,” she concludes, “is what gives the archetypes in ‘Gone With the Wind’ their extraordinary human resonance,” and thanks to the way the three of them threw themselves into the project, “that historical ‘costume’ story” never feels remotely past.
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  2. divulgence
    • 2009 April 24, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “Barbershop”, New York Times:
      But it is much more important, a spontaneous moment of confidentiality and divulgence.
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  3. fil *
    • 2009 April 24, Steve Smith, “Paunch and Punch in Student ‘Falstaff’”, New York Times:
      Jennifer Zetlan and Paul Appleby brought endless charm and radiant voices to the young lovers, Nannetta and Fenton. Ms. Zetlan’s clear, penetrating tone and intense focus in the third act’s “Sul fil d’un soffio etesio” induced shivers.
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  4. flapperesque
    • 2009 April 24, Michiko Kakutani, “Lots of Contradictions in Birthin’ That Movie”, New York Times:
      Ms. Haskell also goes over the autobiographical correspondences between Margaret Mitchell and her two creations, Scarlett and Melanie, contrasting the author’s tomboy childhood and flapperesque youth with the ladylike gentility she assumed later in life; her fierce determination to become a writer and her fear of the social backlash the publication of her novel might set off.
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  5. hypercontrolled
    • 2009 April 24, Andrew Jacobs, “Jackie Chan Strikes a Chinese Nerve”, New York Times:
      On Facebook , more than 9,700 people threw their weight behind a tongue-in-cheek effort to dispatch Mr. Chan to hypercontrolled North Korea.
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  6. khedive
    • 2009 April 24, Wendy Moonan, “Well on in Years but Never Out of Date”, New York Times:
      Commissioned by a pharaoh in about 1400 B.C. to show his dedication to the sun god, it was a gift to New York by Ismail Pasha, the khedive who governed Egypt for the Ottoman Empire.
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  7. lieti *
    • 2009 April 24, James Barron, “As Manhattan Bus Rolls, Driver Polishes His Pavarotti”, New York Times:
      There, in the shadow of a housing project by the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive, he spent a four-minute layover in the aisle, practicing Alfredo’s half of “Libiamo ne’ lieti calici”—the drinking song from “La Traviata,” a duet.
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  8. multichallenger
    • 2009 April 24, The Associated Press, “Alinghi Rejects Proposal”, New York Times:
      BMW Oracle and its backer, the Golden Gate Yacht Club, won a ruling April 2 that gave them the right to negotiate terms for the next America’s Cup. If terms are not reached on a multichallenger regatta, the Americans will have the right to face Alinghi in a best-of-three series in multihulls.
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  9. nodelike
    • 2009 April 24, Roberta Smith, “MoMA Pushes the Envelope in Works on Paper”, New York Times:
      Its ability to absorb new ideas and collaborate with other mediums is evident in installations like Kelley Walker’s digital layering of bright cabochon shapes and news images of disasters, which form a kind of wallpaper for further works, or Jim Lambie’s relatively low-tech wall piece, where appropriated images of eyes held in place by black tape form networks of alien, nodelike clusters that challenge and deflect our gaze with the horrors of mascara gone mad.
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  10. ouset
    • 2009 April 24, Wendy Moonan, “Well on in Years but Never Out of Date”, New York Times:
      Flanking a fine George III mahogany partners’ desk with ouset corners are two English 18th-century mahogany loop-back drawing room chairs. Ms. Abbott says she borrowed them from the dealer Clinton Howell for their graphic silhouettes.
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  11. positionings
    • 2009 April 24, Michiko Kakutani, “Lots of Contradictions in Birthin’ That Movie”, New York Times:
      At the same time, Ms. Haskell observes, the art director William Cameron Menzies endowed the sprawling opus with a visual coherence: “The expressionistic landscapes and character positionings designed by Menzies and his staff keep certain images as touchstones, in the forefront of consciousness — like the horse collapsing on the bridge, the fire in the background, the use of the new moon,” even as his masterful use of the new process of Technicolor worked to heighten the drama of the story.
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  12. soffio *
    • 2009 April 24, Steve Smith, “Paunch and Punch in Student ‘Falstaff’”, New York Times:
      Jennifer Zetlan and Paul Appleby brought endless charm and radiant voices to the young lovers, Nannetta and Fenton. Ms. Zetlan’s clear, penetrating tone and intense focus in the third act’s “Sul fil d’un soffio etesio” induced shivers.
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  13. stuntlike
  14. supertechnocrats
    • 2009 April 24, David Brooks, “Yanks in Crisis”, New York Times:
      Americans still want to see power dispersed among a diversity of institutions, not concentrated in the hands of supertechnocrats in Washington.
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  15. suspendered
    • 2009 April 24, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “Barbershop”, New York Times:
      It is astonishing how much pleasure this moment contains — the story, the implicit solicitation of advice, the modest deferral as the suspendered man speaks.
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  16. unrepenting
    • 2009 April 24, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      TRAVIS (Saturday) “Why does it always rain on me?” asked the Travis frontman Fran Healy in a 1999 single of the same name, forever galvanizing Travis’s reputation for unrepenting sad sackery.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. bongbongbongbongbongbong
    • 2009 April 24, Susan Dominus, “At Age 51, a New Day at the Wheel”, New York Times:
      The air conditioning was broken, so the cab was sweltering. Mr. Marong’s seat belt was broken, which meant the seat-belt reminder signal went off loudly — bongbongbongbongbongbong — just when he was trying to concentrate most (state law says seat belt use is not compulsory in cabs).
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  2. sackery
    • 2009 April 24, The New York Times, “Pop and Rock Listings”, New York Times:
      TRAVIS (Saturday) “Why does it always rain on me?” asked the Travis frontman Fran Healy in a 1999 single of the same name, forever galvanizing Travis’s reputation for unrepenting sad sackery.
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  3. skwim
    • 2009 April 24, Bethany Lyttle, “A Sunny Spot Amid the Clouds”, New York Times:
      Word of mouth, primarily among pilots, is credited with the steady growth of Sequim (pronounced skwim).
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  4. zlozony
    • 2009 April 24, The New York Times, “Dance Listings”, New York Times:
      The 1979 “Glacial Decoy” was her first important collaboration with Robert Rauschenberg , and “O zlozony/O composite,” created in 2004 for the Paris Opera Ballet , was her first use of ballet dancers.
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  5. zurich *
    • 2009 April 24, The Associated Press, “Ochoa Shoots 65”, New York Times:
      ¶Charlie Wi of South Korea took advantage of soft early-morning conditions to shoot a six-under 66 for a one-stroke lead after the first round of the Zurich Classic in Avondale, La. The Masters runner-up Kenny Perry had a 69. zurich
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