User:Visviva/NYT 20090426

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-04-26 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-08-19).

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104320 tokens ‧ 77059 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 10513 types ‧ 49 (~ 0.466%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-04-26[edit]

  1. alecks
    • 2009 April 26, Ben Stein, “The Sales Profession: Attention Must Still Be Paid”, New York Times:
      The fact that so many people in insurance sell you what’s good for you, even when smart alecks are telling you not to buy it, makes their work extremely impressive.
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  2. antiblast
    • 2009 April 26, Rod Nordland, “Iraq’s False Spring”, New York Times:
      Hescos — antiblast protection consisting of big wire containers of rubble — defy all attempts at decoration.
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  3. antiemotional
    • 2009 April 26, Chip Brown, “Enlightenment Therapy”, New York Times:
      For two decades he lectured on the emergence of Western lay Zen, arguing against what he saw as the antiemotional bias of monastic Asian Zen in favor of an approach that integrated psychological experience into meditation practice.
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  4. antiflu
  5. apothecarist
    • 2009 April 26, Mark Ford, “Samurai Critic”, New York Times:
      Only time will tell if Logan’s gift for spotting a loser is a trustworthy one, and he freely acknowledges that future generations may well view his demolitions of whomever in the same spirit that we now read Francis Jeffrey’s ad hominem attack on Wordsworth or John Wilson Croker’s sneering dismissal of a first volume by a jumped-up Cockney apothecarist, one John Keats.
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  6. birthmarked
    • 2009 April 26, Victoria Redel, “Dangerously Close”, New York Times:
      In death, Reuben, with his birthmarked red face, is finally more ferociously alive to his father than he ever was as a boy struggling to fit in.
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  7. bundt
  8. campiello *
    • 2009 April 26, Hilary Howard, “Updated Hotels in Venice and Paris”, New York Times:
      The 165 rooms overlook either the canal or the hotel’s campiello, a courtyard with a retractable glass ceiling.
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  9. coolsploitation
    • 2009 April 26, Ben Sisario, “Out of the Bodega and Onto the Scene”, New York Times:
      Whenever there is coolsploitation, however, there is potential trouble, and marketing experts say that Café Bustelo’s reboot will not be easy.
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  10. diminishingly
    • 2009 April 26, Dave Kehr, “Nagisa Oshima’s Realm of Restraint and Precision”, New York Times:
      Explaining that the old man has gone to Tokyo for work, the lovers enjoy three diminishingly blissful years together, until the forces of order belatedly show up in the figure of a goofy, accident-prone inspector from the city (Takuzo Kawatani).
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  11. earmarkable
    • 2009 April 26, William Safire, “Wide World of Words”, New York Times:
      In bookstores (you remember them), windows and prime-space tables display language books — not images on screens but easy-to-read print on paper pages happily bound together and easily earmarkable, underlinable and turnable.
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  12. extraliterary
    • 2009 April 26, Tom Bissell, “Great and Terrible Truths”, New York Times:
      For all the obvious extraliterary reasons, “This Is Water” is often an extremely painful reading experience, and in this opinion I cannot imagine I will be alone.
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  13. herbologist
    • 2009 April 26, “Angie Kim and Daniel Keh”, New York Times:
      His mother retired as a concert pianist; she is a herbologist and acupuncturist in private practice in New City.
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  14. hucksterish
    • 2009 April 26, Charles Isherwood, “A Long Wait for Another Shot at Broadway”, New York Times:
      And the hucksterish marketing tactics of the producer, Michael Myerberg, did not prepare audiences for the play’s aesthetic radicalism.
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  15. lexies
    • 2009 April 26, William Safire, “Wide World of Words”, New York Times:
      Quinion is a Brit, best known among lexies for his Web site World Wide Words, where he leaps from vanishing locutions to the latest lingo around the globe.
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  16. midtap
    • 2009 April 26, Elizabeth Giddens, “The House of Much History”, New York Times:
      My restless sock feet stopped midtap, on the very floor those gentlemen trod in their calfskin shoes and spats.
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  17. misteakes
    • 2009 April 26, William Safire, “Wide World of Words”, New York Times:
      (Those misteakes are inserted by subversive copy editors.)
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  18. monographed
    • 2009 April 26, Charles Isherwood, “A Long Wait for Another Shot at Broadway”, New York Times:
      It is among the most studied, monographed, celebrated and sent-up works of modern art, and perhaps as influential as any from the last century.
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  19. multitracking
    • 2009 April 26, Jon Pareles, “Guitars and a New Jerseyan Scream”, New York Times:
      In the era of unlimited multitracking, Anni Rossi’s “Rockwell” (4AD) is a solo album that feels like one: an exercise in austerity, recorded in a single day. Ms. Rossi accompanies her clear, confident voice with her viola — plucked or bowed or strummed — abetted by bare-bones drumming and an occasional cello or keyboard.
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  20. nonironic
    • 2009 April 26, Jean Tang, “Hong Kong, but Hold the Glitz”, New York Times:
      T. guys wearing chambray shirts untucked over baggy jeans, journalists in ironic T-shirts and nonironic glasses, strangers passing a house guitar: Club 71 is the antithesis of a Philippe Starck watering hole.
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  21. nonplusment
    • 2009 April 26, Charles Isherwood, “A Long Wait for Another Shot at Broadway”, New York Times:
      Perhaps unsurprisingly — apologies to the good people of 1956 Miami — the reception amid the swizzle sticks and shuffleboards was general nonplusment.
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  22. nontextual
    • 2009 April 26, Pankaj Mishra, “Another Incarnation”, New York Times:
      Still, the nontextual, syncretic religious and philosophical traditions of India that escaped the attention of British scholars flourish even today.
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  23. ozony
    • 2009 April 26, Claudia La Rocco, “40 Years of Creations, Onstage and on Paper”, New York Times:
      The Brooklyn Academy program features the United States premiere of another European work, “O z{lstrok}ozony/O Composite.”
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  24. peelable
  25. photofinisher
    • 2009 April 26, Nathan Ward, “The Spy of Cadman Plaza”, New York Times:
      The older man, who had rented space on Mr. Silverman’s floor in Ovington Studios, a seven-story building of artist studios near Cadman Plaza on the edge of Brooklyn Heights, introduced himself as Emil Goldfus, a retired photofinisher and an amateur painter.
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  26. poofle
    • 2009 April 26, Ginia Bellafante, “Miniskirt Lib”, New York Times:
      Piffle poofle to that!”)
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  27. postflood
    • 2009 April 26, Cheryl Wagner, “Wound, Tooth, Time”, New York Times:
      Like many postflood sights, the specter of Neck Wound dragged on and on.
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  28. postterrorist
    • 2009 April 26, Sam Tanenhaus, “Rake’s Progress”, New York Times:
      The oldest entry in the new collection, “In the North-West Frontier Province,” eerily predicts our current postterrorist age.
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  29. printbound
    • 2009 April 26, William Safire, “Wide World of Words”, New York Times:
      For reasons known only to printbound publishers, books about words are suddenly the talk of the town.
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  30. sabar
    • 2009 April 26, Vivien Schweitzer, “A Son Composes His Own Path”, New York Times:
      “Moving Houses,” performed by the string quartet Ethel, starts with a moody, simple violin and cello theme before evolving into a complex melee with references to Gypsy fiddling, the Beatles ’ “Eleanor Rigby,” sabar drumming from Senegal and the melodic styles of West African griots.
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  31. semiproductive
    • 2009 April 26, Philip Galanes, “Make Mine a Double”, New York Times:
      And trust me, it may take decades, but this woman will get over you eventually, and even go on to live a semiproductive life.
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  32. semisubmersible
    • 2009 April 26, David Kushner, “Drug-Sub Culture”, New York Times:
      This kind of vessel — a self-propelled, semisubmersible made by hand in the jungles of Colombia — is no longer quite so mythic: four were intercepted in January alone.
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  33. semisubmersibles
    • 2009 April 26, David Kushner, “Drug-Sub Culture”, New York Times:
      The alternative: semisubmersibles that, though considerably smaller than the sub found in the warehouse, can carry five times as much cocaine as a common fishing vessel.
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  34. semisubs
    • 2009 April 26, David Kushner, “Drug-Sub Culture”, New York Times:
      It was el ataúd , the coffin, the nickname Colombians gave to semisubs after a few were rumored to have disappeared at sea.
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  35. sideyards
    • 2009 April 26, Gregory Beyer, “Prosperous Area Seeks Shops to Match”, New York Times:
      Whether separated by sideyards or joined as row houses spanning the length of entire blocks, they create a repetitive, geometrical effect.
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  36. sopressata
    • 2009 April 26, “Travelers’ Picks”, New York Times:
      Toppings, including imported salami, prosciutto, Italian sausage and sopressata, are $1 each.
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  37. sua *
    • 2009 April 26, Sam Tanenhaus, “Rake’s Progress”, New York Times:
      As it unfolds a synoptic map of McInerney’s literary progress from the 1980s (downtown clubs, New Wave music, cocaine) to the 2000s (Upper East Side lairs, “The Sopranos,” pastoral detox spas), “How It Ended” implicitly proposes an apologia pro vita sua of an author often tagged as a kind of Lizard Lounge act, his repertoire limited to reports on Manhattan hedonism — particularly in the 1980s and ’90s, when for the entitled few the borough was a den of iniquitous pleasures and McInerney himself a bleary-eyed magnet for tabloid photo­journalists and eavesdropping waiters doubling as anonymous tipsters.
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  38. tapabocas
    • 2009 April 26, Marc Lacey, “Mexico Takes Powers to Isolate Cases of Swine Flu”, New York Times:
      Of those Mexicans who did go out in public, many took the advice of the authorities and donned the masks, which are known here as tapabocas, or cover-your-mouths, and were being handed out by soldiers and health workers at subway stops and on street corners.
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  39. terza *
    • 2009 April 26, “Poetry Chronicle”, New York Times:
      Given McClatchy’s formal virtuosity, I wouldn’t be surprised to learn he jots his grocery lists in terza rima, too.
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  40. thorned
    • 2009 April 26, Victoria Redel, “Dangerously Close”, New York Times:
      Even now, with my sons both teenagers, I sometimes wish I could buckle them into a double stroller to maneuver them safely down city streets thorned with dazzling dangers and unspeakable terrors.
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  41. turnable
    • 2009 April 26, William Safire, “Wide World of Words”, New York Times:
      In bookstores (you remember them), windows and prime-space tables display language books — not images on screens but easy-to-read print on paper pages happily bound together and easily earmarkable, underlinable and turnable.
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  42. unambivalently
    • 2009 April 26, Ginia Bellafante, “Miniskirt Lib”, New York Times:
      Weighing Brown’s benighted ideas against the sum of her contributions to the cause of female sexual freedom, Jennifer Scanlon argues unambivalently — in “Bad Girls Go Everywhere: The Life of Helen Gurley Brown” — for her inclusion in the pantheon of remarkable mid-20th-century feminists.
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  43. underlinable
    • 2009 April 26, William Safire, “Wide World of Words”, New York Times:
      In bookstores (you remember them), windows and prime-space tables display language books — not images on screens but easy-to-read print on paper pages happily bound together and easily earmarkable, underlinable and turnable.
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  44. voluptuaries
    • 2009 April 26, “Poetry Chronicle”, New York Times:
      “The Seven Deadly Sins” possesses a relentless elegance of expression, but many of its ideas are banal (“Dogged voluptuaries usually make straight / For the very thing they over and over have had, / Then vomit up the greedily swallowed bait”), grandiloquent (“When Francis of Assisi ate, / Ashes were his only spice.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. jbburrows
    • 2009 April 26, Virginia Heffernan, “Comment Is King”, New York Times:
      Not long ago, a poster named jbburrows pronounced Applebaum a “liberal fool.”
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  2. langlit
    • 2009 April 26, William Safire, “Wide World of Words”, New York Times:
      One of these days I’ll survey the langlit on the Web; suggestions welcome.
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  3. lstrok
    • 2009 April 26, Claudia La Rocco, “40 Years of Creations, Onstage and on Paper”, New York Times:
      The Brooklyn Academy program features the United States premiere of another European work, “O z{lstrok}ozony/O Composite.”
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  4. mauer
    • 2009 April 26, Hilary Howard, “Berlin Is Partying Like It’s 1989”, New York Times:
      A guide to the events is at www.visitberlin.de/reiseindustrie/en/broschuere_berliner-mauer_en.pdf .
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  5. ttending = attending
    • 2009 April 26, Mark Oppenheimer, “Leaving the Fold”, New York Times:
      ttending church, Lobdell noticed improvements in his life — new friends, a calmer marriage, a better job, even less acne — and attributed them to God. In 1992, two years after he began attending church, Lobdell was finally born again, at a men’s retreat in the San Bernardino Mountains.
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