User:Visviva/NYT 20090531

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-05-31 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-08-19).

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185698 tokens ‧ 132701 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13862 types ‧ 88 (~ 0.635%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-05-31[edit]

  1. agrofuels
    • 2009 May 31, Elizabeth Royte, “The Forest Dumbledore”, New York Times:
      He continues: “It is madness to suppose we would make a significant difference by using more energy-efficient lightbulbs and using agrofuels rather than oil, or that city dwellers can or would take up a rural farming or a hunter-gatherer lifestyle: given our numbers there is no land.”
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  2. alap *
    • 2009 May 31, Allan Kozinn, “Two Pulitzer Winners and One Eclectic Mix”, New York Times:
      The violist Hank Dutt has an especially lovely solo turn in the introductory alap from Ram Narayan’s “Raga Mishra Bhairavi,” and the quartet seamlessly melds with the Alim Qasimov Ensemble, an Azerbaijani troupe, in “Getme, Getme.”
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  3. antistab
  4. arancini *
    • 2009 May 31, Karla Cook, “Succulent Food, but the Pacing Is Off”, New York Times:
      In addition to the aforementioned appetizers, there was, for instance, a serving of three racquetball-size arancini (fried rice balls), one filled with porcini, one with cheese and one with peas, each in its own private pool of tomato sauce.
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  5. archivolt
    • 2009 May 31, Caroline Weber, “Lightning Rods and Sideshows”, New York Times:
      Transept and buttress; trumeau and nave; tympanum, apse and archivolt — the gang’s all here, as well it should be.
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  6. aspirationally
    • 2009 May 31, Christine Muhlke, “Cookbooks”, New York Times:
      Some recipes are aspirationally insane — fried chicken and andouille gumbo, or “game day” choucroute with sausage, tasso and duck confit — while others I simply aspire to make, like a fried oyster and bacon sandwich (bacon recipe included), and Link’s outstanding boudin, which he also uses as a heart-stopping beignet filling.
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  7. asteorological
    • 2009 May 31, Elizabeth Royte, “The Forest Dumbledore”, New York Times:
      Here’s an example: “The solstices, the asteorological relationships during the Earth’s annual journey around the sun, proximally cause the seasons and the overall weather patterns to which life adjusts.”
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  8. blingy
    • 2009 May 31, Christine Muhlke, “Cookbooks”, New York Times:
      Adam Perry Lang is at the opposite end of the grilling spectrum, a blingy S.U.V. to Mallmann’s muddy old Land Rover.
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  9. carlike
  10. cartoonishness
    • 2009 May 31, Sylviane Gold, “And All Because Mary Visited the Barbershop”, New York Times:
      Peggy Cosgrave, under the direction of Penguin’s artistic director, Joe Brancato , gives Clara a genial, down-to-earth kindness that keeps her simplicity from crossing over into cartoonishness — a real risk given the jokey facility of Mr. Dudzick’s writing.
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  11. chanteur *
  12. chateaulike
  13. coverin
    • 2009 May 31, Jonathan Miles, “Food Bloggers of 1940”, New York Times:
      Couched between a selection of black Mississippi recipes transcribed in dialect (“wrop cakes in a collard leaf, place on dese coals coverin wid some more hot so hot”) and the Christmas dinner menu at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, Ky., is a stunning prose poem by Zora Neale Hurston about a mythical place in African-American folklore — a kind of barbecue version of Shangri-La — known as “Diddy Wah Diddy.”
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  14. crassulacean
    • 2009 May 31, Dominique Browning, “Gardening Books”, New York Times:
      His description of crassulacean acid metabolism, wherein cacti, yuccas, agaves and sedums open their stomata at night when it’s cooler in order to “bind carbon dioxide on special molecules much like we bind oxygen on hemoglobin in our blood” had me on edge for hours.
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  15. crostino *
    • 2009 May 31, Alice Gabriel, “Taking Tradition, and Running With It”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKED Arugula salad with prosciutto and kumquats, salad with mussels and calamari, grilled scamorza, crostino of fresh ricotta, lamb Bolognese, pork osso buco, hanger steak with escarole and goose-fat potatoes; fried dough with Nutella, sticky date tortina, ricotta cheesecake in a jar.
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  16. cyberoperations
    • 2009 May 31, Christopher Drew, “Contractors Vie for Plum Work, Hacking for the United States”, New York Times:
      Mr. Chase, who wears his hair in a ponytail, and Terry Gillette, a 53-year-old former rocket engineer, ran SI Government Solutions before selling the company to Raytheon last year as the boom in the military’s cyberoperations accelerated.
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  17. cyberweapons
    • 2009 May 31, Christopher Drew, “Contractors Vie for Plum Work, Hacking for the United States”, New York Times:
      Though even the existence of research on cyberweapons was once highly classified, the Air Force plans this year to award the first publicly announced contract for developing tools to break into enemy computers.
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  18. dese *
    • 2009 May 31, Jonathan Miles, “Food Bloggers of 1940”, New York Times:
      Couched between a selection of black Mississippi recipes transcribed in dialect (“wrop cakes in a collard leaf, place on dese coals coverin wid some more hot so hot”) and the Christmas dinner menu at the Brown Hotel in Louisville, Ky., is a stunning prose poem by Zora Neale Hurston about a mythical place in African-American folklore — a kind of barbecue version of Shangri-La — known as “Diddy Wah Diddy.”
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  19. disqualifier *
    • 2009 May 31, “Judging Sonia Sotomayor”, New York Times:
      If writing bland opinions were a disqualifier, there would be no former appeals court judges on the Supreme Court.
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  20. duomo *
    • 2009 May 31, Adam Begley, “O Sole Mio”, New York Times:
      In the duomo in Lucca she sees the first great painting of her Italian sojourn, Tintoretto’s “Last Supper.”
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  21. eo *
  22. expectorations
    • 2009 May 31, Dave Itzkoff, “Finding the Fun in Eternal Frat Boys”, New York Times:
      But he was also a one-man awkward relationship, who hurled his bodily expectorations at his audiences and vowed he would kill himself onstage.
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  23. fairgoers
    • 2009 2009-08-19, Pilar Viladas, “Play Time”, New York Times, page 56:
      And no discussion of playfulness would be complete without mentioning the Italian company Campeggi, which has long been delighting Milan fairgoers with its ingenious, winsome designs for inflatable beds and sleep sofas that put American versions to shame.
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  24. fakelore
    • 2009 May 31, Jerry Griswold, “A Family of Epic Proportions”, New York Times:
      Behind all this was the mythy Paul Bunyan, that giant lumberjack from the North Woods who bestrode entire counties in a single step while accompanied by the equally gigantic Babe the Blue Ox. To be sure, as with other heroes of American fakelore — bear-wrestling Davy Crockett, coyote-raised Pecos Bill, river-boating Mike Fink — there lingered about Paul Bunyan an aroma of frontier development and ­chamber-of-commerce boosterism.
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  25. firstavenueplayhouse
  26. foodoir
    • 2009 May 31, Christine Muhlke, “Heartburn”, New York Times:
      The foodoir was popularized by the likes of Frances Mayes and Ruth Reichl , who wrote eloquently of lazy Italian plumbers and revolutionary West Coast restaurants, punctuating their musings with recipes that brought the flavors of their stories onto the reader’s plate — that is, if readers wanted to get their hardcover splattered.
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  27. frita *
    • 2009 May 31, Alice Gabriel, “Taking Tradition, and Running With It”, New York Times:
      The clever lineup of desserts includes sticky date tortina (a lovely riff on sticky toffee pudding) and, best of all, pasta frita, little pillows of fried dough filled with Nutella and served with spicy cinnamon gelato.
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  28. gardenload
    • 2009 May 31, Joanne Starkey, “Old-School Chinese With Efforts at Fusion”, New York Times:
      Entrees we liked included a toss of succulent beef and crunchy asparagus, tender pork in a very spicy garlic sauce with a gardenload of Asian vegetables, and hot and spicy shrimp, firm jumbos in a barbecue sauce with chopped onions and peas.
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  29. groceryman
    • 2009 May 31, Jonathan Miles, “Food Bloggers of 1940”, New York Times:
      The cream may be sold at the cream station and butter purchased from the groceryman.
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  30. interdimensional
  31. ipsa *
  32. jitteringly
    • 2009 May 31, “Reaching Here”, New York Times:
      In later centuries, the masses of European immigrants making footfall in New York’s streets saw the turbid, jostling, unprecedented mix of peoples, all striving to get ahead, and called the jitteringly new phenomenon “American.”
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  33. kbps
  34. kelseyatmccc
  35. larkspurs
    • 2009 May 31, Mary Jo Murphy, “Nancy Drew and the Secret of the 3 Black Robes”, New York Times:
      “Nancy Drew plots are based on coincidence,” Bobbie Ann Mason wrote in an admiring book about her, going on to describe one from “The Password to Larkspur Lane”: Nancy’s in the garden, picking larkspurs.
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  36. logorati *
    • 2009 May 31, William Safire, “Thank-You Signals”, New York Times:
      (I just deleted “so to speak,” a smarmy phrase that means “don’t miss the wordplay,” which would insult the abundance of sources who have just demonstrated their membership in the logorati.)
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  37. loquitur *
  38. maison *
    • 2009 2009-08-19, Christine Muhlke, “The World Is His Oyster”, New York Times, page 76:
      “It’s a house for living, pas une maison chic,” said Jasmine, who worked as a global press attaché for Louis Vuitton and is now director of communications for her husband.
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  39. meatness
    • 2009 May 31, Dana Jennings, “Running to Reclaim Your Body”, New York Times:
      The meatness of me and the cancer exasperated me and wore me out, so I retreated from my traitorous body.
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  40. microchapters
    • 2009 May 31, Christine Muhlke, “Heartburn”, New York Times:
      In posting-length microchapters, Wizenberg describes her charmed upbringing in a food-filled household in Oklahoma, where she’s taught to live and eat “wholly, hungrily, loudly.”
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  41. minimuseum
    • 2009 May 31, “Events on Long Island”, New York Times:
      ROSLYN HARBOR Nassau County Museum of Art “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” an indoor and outdoor fantasy land at the minimuseum.
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  42. mntk
  43. multibar
    • 2009 May 31, Phil Patton, “Bulldog in a Box, in Shades”, New York Times:
      The fully equipped Krom model has a multibar grille that is a dead ringer for the ones now found on Fords.
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  44. mythy
    • 2009 May 31, Jerry Griswold, “A Family of Epic Proportions”, New York Times:
      Behind all this was the mythy Paul Bunyan, that giant lumberjack from the North Woods who bestrode entire counties in a single step while accompanied by the equally gigantic Babe the Blue Ox. To be sure, as with other heroes of American fakelore — bear-wrestling Davy Crockett, coyote-raised Pecos Bill, river-boating Mike Fink — there lingered about Paul Bunyan an aroma of frontier development and ­chamber-of-commerce boosterism.
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  45. neckstrap
  46. noncharismatic
    • 2009 May 31, Elizabeth Royte, “The Forest Dumbledore”, New York Times:
      “Summer World” will please fans of noncharismatic, non-mega fauna, but the book isn’t all splendor in the grass.
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  47. nonmandated
    • 2009 May 31, “Autism Doesn’t Have an Age Limit”, New York Times:
      After that, there is nothing except a handful of nonmandated programs with long waiting lists that live hand to mouth, dependent on the ups and downs of the state budget each year.
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  48. nonrelated
    • 2009 May 31, “The Ethicist”, New York Times:
      Similarly, while the drive-through customer’s banking relationship may be privileged, the nonrelated personal information isn’t.
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  49. nuit *
    • 2009 2009-08-19, Christine Muhlke, “The World Is His Oyster”, New York Times, page 76:
      A Rod Stewart song came on the stereo and, out of nowhere, Philippe scooped up Jasmine for a raucous dance and serenade, followed by a toast to “l’amour, la nuit et le jour.”
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  50. nurserymaid
    • 2009 May 31, Scarlett Thomas, “House Calls”, New York Times:
      Smuggled inside by his mother, a former nurserymaid there, he wanders off to admire the lovely mansion and ends up taking a piece of it with him: a decorative plaster acorn he prises off the wall with his penknife.
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  51. overparenting
    • 2009 May 31, Lisa Belkin, “Let the Kid Be”, New York Times:
      Or is the apparent decline of overparenting (and its corollaries: feelings of competition and inadequacy) actually the same obsession donning a new disguise?
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  52. paleopathologist
    • 2009 May 31, Joshua Hammer, “Travel Books”, New York Times:
      He examines the curious dissemination of pieces of saints around the globe, meets a cast of fellow enthusiasts — including a French paleopathologist who spends his spare time rummaging through the supposed bone fragments of Joan of Arc — and explores the fringes of religious devotion.
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  53. paned
  54. patchoguetheatre
  55. peated
    • 2009 May 31, Joshua Hammer, “Travel Books”, New York Times:
      She also serves up pungent assessments of the spirits she samples, from Bushmills White Label (“the Julia Roberts of the whiskey world”) to Isle of Jura Single Malt Whisky 10Y (“the perfect introduction to peated malts”).
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  56. picante *
    • 2009 May 31, Karla Cook, “Succulent Food, but the Pacing Is Off”, New York Times:
      The Orlando salad, though laden with fresh and expertly grilled calamari, scallops and shrimp, as well as orange and grapefruit, had a disappointingly sweet dressing and was missing its promised drizzle of picante olive oil.
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  57. pizzette *
    • 2009 May 31, Alice Gabriel, “Taking Tradition, and Running With It”, New York Times:
      A nicely charred pizzette strewn with juicy clams and garlic was strong on flavor, but we were alarmed to find bits of clam shell in the mix.
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  58. postcancer
    • 2009 May 31, Dana Jennings, “Running to Reclaim Your Body”, New York Times:
      Even for cancer patients who don’t want to run, research suggests that some form of exercise postcancer is helpful in recovering from the disease and its treatment.
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  59. preacherly
    • 2009 May 31, “Evolutionary Theology”, New York Times:
      He shifts between the professorial and the preacherly in a way that is reminiscent of the Apostle Paul, although Paul probably attended church more often and worked out less.
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  60. radiatore *
    • 2009 May 31, Alice Gabriel, “Taking Tradition, and Running With It”, New York Times:
      His bold lamb Bolognese, spiked with mint, fills the tiny creases and crevices of radiatore in such a way that every bite brings greater reward.
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  61. renmin *
    • 2009 May 31, Yu Hua, “China’s Forgotten Revolution”, New York Times:
      “The people,” or renmin, is one of the first phrases I learned to read and write.
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  62. rewriters
    • 2009 May 31, Jonathan Miles, “Food Bloggers of 1940”, New York Times:
      Throughout 1940 and 1941, raw copy flowed into Washington, D.C., where it was farmed out to rewriters — including Nelson Algren — for shaping into book form.
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  63. ringolevio
    • 2009 May 31, Lizette Alvarez, “Up and Out of New York’s Projects”, New York Times:
      The real bonding took place in Dyckman Park, now called Monsignor Kett Playground, over stickball and stoopball, tag and ringolevio, handball and touch football — “every game imaginable,” Mr. Abdul-Jabbar recalled.
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  64. rollatini
    • 2009 May 31, Kelly Feeney, “Fire Up the Grill”, New York Times:
      For those who don’t like burgers, dogs or sausages, the shop branches out with entrees like an individual chicken pot pie ($5.99) and eggplant rollatini ($5.99 a pound); just heat and serve.
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  65. scamorza
    • 2009 May 31, Alice Gabriel, “Taking Tradition, and Running With It”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKED Arugula salad with prosciutto and kumquats, salad with mussels and calamari, grilled scamorza, crostino of fresh ricotta, lamb Bolognese, pork osso buco, hanger steak with escarole and goose-fat potatoes; fried dough with Nutella, sticky date tortina, ricotta cheesecake in a jar.
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  66. schmarchitect
  67. seminomadic
    • 2009 May 31, Jori Finkel, “Back to Nature, in Pictures and Action”, New York Times:
      He has visited the seminomadic Zo’e tribe in the heart of the Brazilian rain forest and weathered desolate stretches of the Sahara.
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  68. semitasteful
    • 2009 May 31, Randy Kennedy, “Obama’s Face (That’s Him?) Rules the Web”, New York Times:
      The phenomenon has been a boon to the near-anonymous painting factories crowded together in the suburbs of Shenzhen, China, famous for cranking out copies of masterpieces, along with landscapes and semitasteful nudes.
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  69. sessionography
    • 2009 May 31, “Music Chronicle”, New York Times:
      While Mercer — the author of a biography of the saxophonist Wayne Shorter — is to be applauded for trying to break from the conventional “making of” sessionography, she never quite gets around to making clear such basic facts as exactly when and where “Blue” was recorded, or which songs appear on the album.
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  70. shu *
    • 2009 May 31, Joanne Starkey, “Old-School Chinese With Efforts at Fusion”, New York Times:
      Reading the menu, with whole sections dedicated to categories like moo shu and sweet and sour, is a stroll down memory lane.
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  71. shumai
    • 2009 May 31, Joanne Starkey, “Old-School Chinese With Efforts at Fusion”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKE Hot and sour soup, shrimp toast, shumai, General Tso’s chicken, pork with garlic sauce, beef with asparagus, hot and spicy shrimp, sushi deluxe, cheesecake, fried bananas, litchi sherbet.
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  72. slapshtick
    • 2009 May 31, Penelope Green, “Social Networking”, New York Times:
      She has a penchant for slapstick, or even slapshtick, but so did Preston Sturges , and so you forgive her.
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  73. spherification
    • 2009 2009-08-19, Christine Muhlke, “The World Is His Oyster”, New York Times, page 76:
      One afternoon last summer, the Spanish chef José Andrés was tackling lobsters at the kitchen island while Starck’s surfer-haired preteen son got up to no good with the El Bulli spherification kit.
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  74. spijt *
    • 2009 May 31, Philip Galanes, “Dear Boss, Omit Me”, New York Times:
      “Het spijt me,” which is Dutch for “I’m sorry.”
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  75. subtlty
    • 2009 May 31, Phil Patton, “Bulldog in a Box, in Shades”, New York Times:
      That bold grille is a jarring contrast to the subtlty of the interior, which has an almost relentless, albeit high-concept, motif: a pattern of concentric circles repeated in the headliner fabric, on the faces of the audio speakers, on the cup holder liners and even on the surfaces of knobs.
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  76. tasso *
    • 2009 May 31, Christine Muhlke, “Cookbooks”, New York Times:
      Some recipes are aspirationally insane — fried chicken and andouille gumbo, or “game day” choucroute with sausage, tasso and duck confit — while others I simply aspire to make, like a fried oyster and bacon sandwich (bacon recipe included), and Link’s outstanding boudin, which he also uses as a heart-stopping beignet filling.
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  77. tbd
    • 2009 May 31, Jon Pareles, “Odes to Sex, Samba Soul and a French Novel”, New York Times:
      Drumbeats, not guitars or keyboards, come first for White Rabbits, a Brooklyn band that has just released its second album, “It’s Frightening” (tbd).
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  78. thorned
    • 2009 May 31, Leanne Shear, “Everything’s Relative Around Here”, New York Times:
      A blackthorn — a slew of which are tucked away upstairs — is a traditional thorned walking stick, made from a branch of the blackthorn tree.
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  79. tortina
    • 2009 May 31, Alice Gabriel, “Taking Tradition, and Running With It”, New York Times:
      The clever lineup of desserts includes sticky date tortina (a lovely riff on sticky toffee pudding) and, best of all, pasta frita, little pillows of fried dough filled with Nutella and served with spicy cinnamon gelato.
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  80. underseasoned
    • 2009 May 31, Alice Gabriel, “Taking Tradition, and Running With It”, New York Times:
      Two less successful entrees were an over-charred chicken “al mattone” (the chicken is weighted by a brick as it grills, and the result should be a crisp, delectable skin) and an underseasoned piece of day-boat cod in an uneasy alliance with cabbage and cannellini beans.
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  81. unfeatured
  82. unidyllic
    • 2009 May 31, The Editors, “Up Front: David Byrne”, New York Times:
      On his blog at davidbyrne.com , Byrne chronicles his cycling adventures in unidyllic spots like Naples and Hong Kong (“the worst city for cyclists that I have encountered in the whole world”), as well as in some more bike-friendly territory.
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  83. unmodulated
    • 2009 May 31, Dave Kehr, “One Man’s Love Life”, New York Times:
      And the performances have a raw, unmodulated quality, as if everyone were simply pouring out their thoughts and feelings.
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  84. unshowbizlike
    • 2009 May 31, John Wray, “The Making of Zach Galifianakis”, New York Times:
      “What I call the ‘geography’ of a room — its size, its layout, the overall feel of the place — really determines how far you can push things,” the comic in question, a cherubic man with a fiery red beard and the distinctly unshowbizlike name of Zach Galifianakis, told me in the greenroom a short time before.
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  85. videojournalist

Sequestered[edit]

  1. broadwaytheatre
  2. hudsonoperahouse
  3. ifn
    • 2009 May 31, Anita Gates, “Shakespearean in a Down-Home Vernacular”, New York Times:
      Once in a while, Elegua gets serious (“Listen ifn you looking for them black or white wrong or right answers from me, honey, you got the wrong one”), but largely, women are comic relief.
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