User:Visviva/NYT 20090611

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-06-11 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-08-19).

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89105 tokens ‧ 66159 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 8719 types ‧ 21 (~ 0.241%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-06-11[edit]

  1. blingy
  2. cording
    • 2009 June 11, Karin Nelson, “A Sleight of Hand With a Bit of String”, New York Times:
      This season, the two managed to make macramé look modern again by combining it with mesh, chiffon and silk-cotton cording in muted tones.
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  3. coronarius
    • 2009 June 11, Anne Raver, “Loppers in Hand, Sculpturing the Bushes”, New York Times:
      The mock oranges (Philadelphus coronarius) explode with fragrant white flowers that billow over the grass like spicy clouds.
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  4. cyberpatients
    • 2009 June 11, Malia Wollan, “Lights, Camera, Contraction!”, New York Times:
      Explicit medical videos are among the exceptions, allowing cyberpatients and other viewers 18 and over to watch videos of colonoscopies , appendectomies and open-heart surgery.
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  5. girthed
    • 2009 June 11, Ginia Bellafante, “Real Life Is Like ‘Juno,’ Except Maybe the Dialogue”, New York Times:
      Amber’s boyfriend, Gary, a nurse’s assistant who spends his off hours playing video games, is equally girthed, making a joke of his size in a T-shirt that says, “First Round Draft Pick.”
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  6. grandiflorum
    • 2009 June 11, Stephen Orr, “Ground Cover, Within Limits”, New York Times:
      For dry shade, he recommended Epimedium grandiflorum (Lilafee), $8.50 each from Digging Dog, which has bronze-tinged spring leaves and large violet-purple flowers, and E. x perralchicum (Frohnleiten), $11.95 for a 4- to 5-inch pot from Heronswood, (877) 674-4714 or heronswood.com , which has bright yellow flowers that dangle between its reddish leaves.
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  7. handmaking
    • 2009 June 11, Penelope Green, “Save That Driftwood for Them”, New York Times:
      The two are handmaking mirrors, sculptures and furnishings from salvaged materials (or “plundered trash,” as Mr. Welsh calls it), driftwood and Mr. Salaiz’s ceramics pieces.
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  8. houttuynia
    • 2009 June 11, Stephen Orr, “Ground Cover, Within Limits”, New York Times:
      But after being reminded of the rogue’s gallery of houttuynia, vinca minor, liriope and even the beloved lily of the valley, he conceded that some plants can perhaps be too agreeable when it comes to colonizing.
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  9. hyperreal
    • 2009 June 11, Celia Mcgee, “Your Invitation Is Not in the Mail”, New York Times:
      The interactive correspondence “was all anybody wanted to talk about,” said Sarah Lenti, who went on to work for Mitt Romney — the way the hyperreal envelope with the invitee’s name appears on the computer, how it reverses to the sender’s on the back, and then the pièce de résistance invitation pops out, so detailed you can see the paper’s grain.
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  10. inflective
  11. laxiculmis
    • 2009 June 11, Stephen Orr, “Ground Cover, Within Limits”, New York Times:
      For those who love ornamental grasses, Carex laxiculmis (Bunny Blue), above, $8.95 for a quart pot from Avant Gardens, (508) 998-8819 or avantgardensne.com , has dainty silvery-blue blades and does well in sun or shade. Mr. Long also suggested Hakonechloa macra (Albo Striata) from Japan, $8.50 each at Digging Dog Nursery, (707) 937-1130 or diggingdog.com , which has white and green variegation and is good in between lower ground covers.
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  12. liriope
    • 2009 June 11, Stephen Orr, “Ground Cover, Within Limits”, New York Times:
      But after being reminded of the rogue’s gallery of houttuynia, vinca minor, liriope and even the beloved lily of the valley, he conceded that some plants can perhaps be too agreeable when it comes to colonizing.
      add
  13. lookbook
    • 2009 June 11, Eric Wilson, “Why Round Sunglasses? A Style Investigation”, New York Times:
      A new line called Suno replicated the staging of Mr. Sidibé’s photographs for its lookbook, right down to the checkerboard marble floor.
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  14. multitenant
  15. peltatum
    • 2009 June 11, Stephen Orr, “Ground Cover, Within Limits”, New York Times:
      In the Northeast, another option is May apple, or Podophyllum peltatum, $4.49 to $7.29 a plant, based on how many are ordered, from Prairie Nursery, (800) 476-9453 or prairienursery.com .
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  16. perralchicum
    • 2009 June 11, Stephen Orr, “Ground Cover, Within Limits”, New York Times:
      For dry shade, he recommended Epimedium grandiflorum (Lilafee), $8.50 each from Digging Dog, which has bronze-tinged spring leaves and large violet-purple flowers, and E. x perralchicum (Frohnleiten), $11.95 for a 4- to 5-inch pot from Heronswood, (877) 674-4714 or heronswood.com , which has bright yellow flowers that dangle between its reddish leaves.
      add
  17. procumbens
    • 2009 June 11, Stephen Orr, “Ground Cover, Within Limits”, New York Times:
      Mr. Long chose a variation on the venerable but aggressive Asian pachysandra, the well-behaved native Allegheny spurge, or Pachysandra procumbens, $15 for a 3.5-inch pot from Asiatica, (717) 938-8677 or asiaticanursery.com .
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  18. pseudoacacia
    • 2009 June 11, Verlyn Klinkenborg, “What the Land Says”, New York Times:
      There are days when I feel pestered by nomenclature, when words like Robinia pseudoacacia — the black locust, which is blooming profusely now — chime in my brain like a simple-minded rhyme.
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  19. seasonless
    • 2009 June 11, Eric Wilson, “Resort Wear Never Rests”, New York Times:
      His designs were so ephemeral that some models appeared as if they had been preserved under an organdy version of Saran Wrap, and his pants were see-through — intriguing, if not exactly seasonless.
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  20. semitractor
    • 2009 June 11, Kirk Johnson, “23 People Are Arrested or Sought in the Looting of Indian Artifacts”, New York Times:
      Many of the pieces — enough to fill a semitractor trailer, including pottery, sandals, digging sticks and stone knives — date from the Anasazi Indians who peopled the Southwest for thousands of years before disappearing about two centuries before the arrival of Columbus in North America.
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  21. unplucked

Sequestered[edit]