User:Visviva/NYT 20090804

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (2009-08-03) Words harvested from the New York Times, 2009-08-04
  • List status: uncleaned
→ Next (2009-08-05)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-08-04 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-08-19).

[ see all NYT pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ] - [ This day's: GuardianToronto Star - Herald Sun ]

76007 tokens ‧ 56676 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 7614 types ‧ 16 (~ 0.21%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-08-04[edit]

  1. ariakensis
    • 2009 August 4, Henry Fountain, “Oysters Are on the Rebound in the Chesapeake Bay”, New York Times:
      The current harvest is less than 200,000 bushels a year, and the situation has become so dire that there is an elaborate proposal to introduce the Asian oyster, C. ariakensis, as an alternative.
      add
  2. broodstock
    • 2009 August 4, Henry Fountain, “Oysters Are on the Rebound in the Chesapeake Bay”, New York Times:
      Most of the earlier reefs were also smaller, usually about an acre in size. Mr. Travelstead said the new effort had shown that “it’s not just build it higher, but build it larger and inundate it with healthy broodstock that is showing some signs of disease resistance.”
      add
  3. dazzlement
    • 2009 August 4, Roberta Smith, “A World Springs to Life on an Urban Wall”, New York Times:
      And everything in it is exquisitely fine-tuned and detailed, a dazzlement of effortless technique that sustains long bouts of close looking.
      add
  4. despleening
    • 2009 August 4, Natalie Angier, “Finally, the Spleen Gets Some Respect”, New York Times:
      All of which means that despleening should be diligently guarded against, particularly among our little sports warriors, perhaps through the wearing of appropriate protective gear.
      add
  5. futbol *
  6. lavalier
    • 2009 August 4, Michael M. Grynbaum, “Cabbies Stay on Their Phones Despite Ban and Risks”, New York Times:
      Research shows that the hands-free devices commonly used by cabbies, like Bluetooth headsets and lavalier microphones, are considered by researchers to be just as dangerous.
      add
  7. monocytic
    • 2009 August 4, Natalie Angier, “Finally, the Spleen Gets Some Respect”, New York Times:
      The researchers searched one organ after another, until they checked the spleen and found the monocytic mother lode.
      add
  8. neuronuclear
    • 2009 August 4, Jane E. Brody, “The Fog That Follows Chemotherapy”, New York Times:
      There are now two new books on the subject: “Chemobrain” (Prometheus Books), by Ellen Clegg, an editor at The Boston Globe , and “Your Brain After Chemo” (Da Capo Press), by Dr. Daniel H. Silverman, a leading researcher in the field, and Idelle Davidson, a health journalist and former breast cancer patient. Dr. Silverman heads the neuronuclear imaging section at the University of California , Los Angeles, Medical Center.
      add
  9. noncapillary
    • 2009 August 4, Natalie Angier, “Finally, the Spleen Gets Some Respect”, New York Times:
      The spleen, by contrast, has a so-called noncapillary circulatory system: as the blood flows in, it is dumped into puddle-like sinusoids, and to get back out it must squeeze between cells.
      add
  10. plumbingless
    • 2009 August 4, Fernanda Santos, “After Chance Meeting, Singer’s Tribute Will Benefit an Animal Sanctuary”, New York Times:
      The EP, which Mr. James is releasing under the moniker Yim Yames (“I just wanted to make my existing name funny sounding,” he said), was recorded at the Gallrein Farms in Shelbyville, in a plumbingless bathroom that is part of the same studio where My Morning Jacket recorded its first albums.
      add
  11. politicals
    • 2009 August 4, Michiko Kakutani, “Another Doorway to the Paranoid Pynchon Dimension”, New York Times:
      He also investigates a hit man “specializing in politicals — black and Chicano activists, antiwar protesters, campus bombers and assorted other pinko” radicals. Mr. Pynchon’s picaresque plots, of course, are Christmas trees on which he can hang all sorts of ornaments, tinsel, garlands and flashing lights, and the plot of “Inherent Vice” is no exception.
      add
  12. prerevolution
    • 2009 August 4, Michiko Kakutani, “Another Doorway to the Paranoid Pynchon Dimension”, New York Times:
      The hero of “Inherent Vice” worries that “the Psychedelic Sixties, this little parenthesis of light, might close after all, and all be lost, taken back into darkness,” that “everything in this dream of prerevolution was in fact doomed to end,” with the “faithless, money-driven world” reasserting “its control over all the lives it felt entitled to touch, fondle and molest.”
      add
  13. splenectomized
    • 2009 August 4, Natalie Angier, “Finally, the Spleen Gets Some Respect”, New York Times:
      The splenectomized men, the researchers found, were twice as likely to die of cardiovascular disease as were the veterans in the control group.
      add
  14. superbuoyant
    • 2009 August 4, Karen Crouse, “Redefining Fast at the ‘Plastic Games’”, New York Times:
      Mark Schubert, the general manager of the United States team, quipped that these world championships would be remembered as the Plastic Games, a reference to the superbuoyant polyurethane suits worn by all but three of the swimmers here who set world records in Olympic events.
      add
  15. technopolitical
    • 2009 August 4, Michiko Kakutani, “Another Doorway to the Paranoid Pynchon Dimension”, New York Times:
      Those earlier books featured intricate, mazelike narratives and enigmatic confrontations between what he has called “average poor bastards” and emissaries of “an emerging technopolitical order that might or might not know what it was doing.”
      add
  16. trashtalking

Sequestered[edit]