User:Visviva/NYT 20090823

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-08-23 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-08-23).

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179762 tokens ‧ 127471 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 13323 types ‧ 78 (~ 0.585%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-08-23[edit]

  1. babiest
    • 2009 August 23, Mary Jo Murphy, “Please, Sir, I Want Less Woodstock”, New York Times:
      They are the babiest of the boomers, carrying all of the baggage but none of the bragging rights of their generation.
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  2. berryish
    • 2009 August 23, Howard G. Goldberg, “The Nautical Spirit”, New York Times:
      The red, mostly merlot but with dollops of cabernet sauvignon and cabernet franc, is berryish, beefy, concentrated and soft.
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  3. blockwide
    • 2009 August 23, Jennifer Steinhauer, “A Cul-de-Sac of Lost Dreams, and New Ones”, New York Times:
      The blockwide birthday parties, neighborly fence-building and Friday chitchat sessions at dusk have become fragile antiques of the preforeclosure days as the new neighbors keep to themselves and the old-timers struggle to keep their footing.
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  4. calabaza *
    • 2009 August 23, Kevin Coyne, “Feeding a More Diverse Market”, New York Times:
      Sweet corn and tomatoes still define summer in the state, but they have been joined by cilantro, bok choy, calabaza, jalapeños and Mr. Kim’s pears.
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  5. cannibalistically
    • 2009 August 23, Sam Sifton, “Something Fishy”, New York Times:
      They grow fat and strong on bunker, squid and, cannibalistically, themselves.
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  6. chee
    • 2009 August 23, Patricia Brooks, “Tasty Thai, and Chinese Surprises”, New York Times:
      Lively entrees included tamarind shrimp (with broccoli) and duck choo chee (smothered in a peppery paste and joined with lime leaves, snow peas and broccoli).
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  7. daggering
    • 2009 August 23, Rob Kenner, “Reggae Singer With a Legacy, a Following and a Mission”, New York Times:
      After a long season dominated by a musical war between Vybz Kartel and Mavado that has divided those artists’ young fans, and a radio ban brought on by a slew of songs about daggering, the latest dirty-dancing trend, the dancehall sound that has dominated Jamaican music for the past two decades has become increasingly unintelligible to the rest of the world.
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  8. decibelwise
    • 2009 August 23, Melena Ryzik, “An Indie Duo’s Surround-Sound”, New York Times:
      It seems like they were doing what made sense to them, and the fact that it didn’t make sense economically or decibelwise, it was almost like: “Oh it doesn’t?
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  9. dessicant
  10. directorless
  11. doansburg
  12. droptops
  13. elementalism
    • 2009 August 23, Dexter Ford, “A Chopper in Looks but a Honda Inside”, New York Times:
      In an unusual collision of throwback elementalism and high-tech safety engineering, the Fury will be available in September with an antilock brake option ($1,000).
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  14. failsome
    • 2009 August 23, “On Language: Fail”, New York Times:
      Failing to mention “win” in an article about “fail” is, well, failsome.
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  15. fairgoers
  16. fissive
    • 2009 August 23, Geoffrey Wheatcroft, “Bread, Wine, Politics”, New York Times:
      The Socialist Party was saved, though not from the fissive tendency that saw its rival factions split away.
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  17. fter
    • 2009 August 23, Geoffrey Wheatcroft, “Bread, Wine, Politics”, New York Times:
      fter the war, Silone was active for a time in Italian politics as a leader of the democratic left, campaigning for a united Europe and opposing the plan to merge Italy’s Socialist and Communist parties.
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  18. futbol *
    • 2009 August 23, Joshua Robinson, New York Times[1]:
      Once in a while, he would throw it around with the local children — kids for whom sports began and ended with futbol — lofting easy passes that, in days past, would have been interceptions.
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  19. glamourpuss
    • 2009 August 23, Eric Konigsberg, “Imbedded at Vogue, Trying a Charm Offensive”, New York Times:
      OF all the fierce, glamourpuss ladies he met while shooting “The September Issue,” his documentary about the inner workings of Vogue magazine, the filmmaker R. J. Cutler found one especially intimidating: an Englishwoman who has spent decades on a high rung of the masthead.
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  20. godsister
    • 2009 August 23, Katie Zezima, “Leah Squires and Eric Traub”, New York Times:
      What seemed a promising turn in their relationship was dashed when he began introducing her to his friends as his godsister.
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  21. goosiness
    • 2009 August 23, Nicholas D. Kristof, “Food for the Soul”, New York Times:
      As for the chick, she never doubted her goosiness.
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  22. hakurei
    • 2009 August 23, Constance Rosenblum, “Home and Headquarters”, New York Times:
      Along the block between Clermont and Vanderbilt Avenues, you can find everything from the DeKalb Convenience Store (“magazines, Lotto and more”) to Ici restaurant, where the menu features chilled hakurei turnip soup.
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  23. hoteling
  24. hourslong
    • 2009 August 23, Katie Zezima, “Leah Squires and Eric Traub”, New York Times:
      As Eric Traub walked Ms. Squires around Cambridge, the two stopped for dinner and dived into an hourslong conversation about their life transitions, social justice, politics and the last decade of their lives.
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  25. howza
  26. hypercaffienated
    • 2009 August 23, Dexter Ford, “A Chopper in Looks but a Honda Inside”, New York Times:
      Which, after all the hypercaffienated action that precedes it, is akin to learning that your home economics teacher has been moonlighting as a pole dancer.
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  27. hypercolor
    • 2009 August 23, Porochista Khakpour, “Finally ‘Thirtysomething’?”, New York Times:
      I sucked my cheeks in to make cheekbones in photos; I loved shoulder-padded power suits and pumps rather than hypercolor T-shirts and graffitied Keds; fruitlessly pleaded for Lee Press-On Nails when all the girls were busy begging for crimping irons; and preferred male company to female company for mostly untomboyish reasons.
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  28. impalation
    • 2009 August 23, Dennis Lim, “Death Lives a Fourth Time to Ply His Trade”, New York Times:
      In the first film, a woman fixing herself a stiff vodka is felled by a kitchen explosion and a knife in the chest; in the second, an attempt to microwave leftovers, foiled by a stray refrigerator magnet, leads to impalation by fire-escape ladder.
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  29. inexplicability
    • 2009 August 23, Robert Wright, “A Grand Bargain Over Evolution”, New York Times:
      The inexplicability of this apprehension, in Lewis’s view, was evidence that the moral law did exist — “out there,” you might say — and was thus evidence that God, too, existed.
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  30. kittley
    • 2009 August 23, Kevin Coyne, “Feeding a More Diverse Market”, New York Times:
      Jamaican hot peppers, bitter balls, kittley (Jamaican eggplant), water greens, sweet potato leaves, jute leaves.
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  31. larb
    • 2009 August 23, Patricia Brooks, “Tasty Thai, and Chinese Surprises”, New York Times:
      TINY NEWCOMER Little Buddha in Stamford has few seats, but a variety of intriguing dishes, like beef larb, below.
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  32. lovefood
    • 2009 August 23, Dominique Browning, “Weight Watcher”, New York Times:
      Restaurant critic for The New York Times is, for those of us who lovefood , one of those dream jobs: getting paid to dine out all over the country.
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  33. lowercased
    • 2009 August 23, Porochista Khakpour, “Finally ‘Thirtysomething’?”, New York Times:
      For me, pretty much everything about the show — the pretentious lowercased logo; the setting in pre-sixth-borough-glory Philadelphia; the almost painstakingly unfamous cast; the difficulty in figuring out whom to crush on and whom to relate to — did not compute, and for some big reasons.
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  34. memebrid
    • 2009 August 23, Virginia Heffernan, “The Feminist Hawks”, New York Times:
      But in his hands, the ideology has fast became a tenacious memebrid — as Tim Hwang, a sociologist and the director of the Web Ecology Project, calls memes that unite two or more cultural phenomena.
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  35. microbephobes
    • 2009 August 23, Natasha Singer, “How to Kill Germs, and Consumer Resistance”, New York Times:
      In a world where the norovirus travels by cruise ship and the swine flu can hop a plane, we have become a country with germ compulsions, a nation of microbephobes.
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  36. millworker
    • 2009 August 23, Drew Jubera, “A Georgia County Shares a Tale of One Man’s Life and Death”, New York Times:
      For years, the story of Mr. Green, a never-married 76-year-old itinerant millworker who could not read or write, and his impending burial had spread through the mountains of Rabun County and beyond, becoming the kind of tale these people have long been famous for telling.
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  37. movielong
    • 2009 August 23, Dennis Lim, “Death Lives a Fourth Time to Ply His Trade”, New York Times:
      The arc of any “Final Destination” film — a futile, movielong negotiation with Death — echoes that of the Bergman classic “The Seventh Seal.”
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  38. nasu *
    • 2009 August 23, M. H. Reed, “East and West in a Complex Fusion”, New York Times:
      Other starters — edamame, spring rolls and warm, almost molten nasu (eggplant) — looked more familiar but proved good enough.
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  39. neckless
    • 2009 August 23, Nicholas D. Kristof, “Food for the Soul”, New York Times:
      That mother goose was thrilled when her eggs hatched, and maternal love is such that she never seemed to notice that one of her babies was a neckless midget.
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  40. neoadjuvant
    • 2009 August 23, Judy Smith, “The Leaves Had Fallen. Where Was Spring?”, New York Times:
      I absorbed his words and resigned myself to surgery, but this doctor also had another idea: neoadjuvant chemotherapy.
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  41. nonavian
    • 2009 August 23, Virginia Heffernan, “The Feminist Hawks”, New York Times:
      WOMEN OF THE WORLD For feminist hawks, feminist doves and even nonavian feminists, EqualityNow.org is a one-stop site for the group determined to “end violence and discrimination against women and girls around the world.”
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  42. nonbelle
    • 2009 August 23, Lisa Belkin, “The Power of the Purse”, New York Times:
      As adults they discovered the power of philanthropy, and about three years ago Swanee (whose own nonbelle career includes years as ambassador to Austria and a lectureship at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, where she teaches that gender parity is the way to ensure peace and rebuild societies) called Helen with an offer.
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  43. nondetailed
    • 2009 August 23, “The Donnell Library, My Place or Yours, and Battling Boards”, New York Times:
      If this creepy stone-box-with-holes were to be designated as a landmark, the next would be Ralph Walker's near-senile last-gasp bland boring box of a similarly nondetailed stone-wall-punched-through-with-square-holes office building at 530 Fifth Avenue between 44th and 45th Streets.
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  44. nondistressed
    • 2009 August 23, Marcelle S. Fischler, “Appraisals as Deal Scuttlers”, New York Times:
      The first was that out-of-area appraisers “didn’t understand the local values”; the second was that they were choosing comparable properties from a pool of foreclosed homes — not exactly indicative of what nondistressed properties might be worth.
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  45. nonrange
    • 2009 August 23, Virginia Heffernan, “The Feminist Hawks”, New York Times:
      The site for the David Horowitz Freedom Center shows the range of his projects and the nonrange of his rhetoric (it’s all fever pitch).
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  46. nonrooted
  47. officio *
  48. oldfashioned
    • 2009 August 23, Tina Kelley, “Between Manhattan and Brooklyn, a Crossing Not Too Far”, New York Times:
      At each of the two towers is a delightful plaque honoring the bridge’s master mechanic, Frank Farrington, who was the first to cross the East River by a travel wire — an oldfashioned zip line — during construction, and who appears to resemble a happy version of the figure in “The Scream.”
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  49. opiners
    • 2009 August 23, “What’s a Big City Without a Newspaper?”, New York Times:
      Much to the heartbreak of fans, Tierney hired a former senator, Rick Santorum ; a talk-show host, Michael Smerconish; and a Bush yes man, John Yoo , giving valuable print real estate to unqualified and untalented opiners gushing predictable right-wing rationales for every issue under the sun.
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  50. overpublicized
  51. petites *
    • 2009 August 23, Clark Hoyt, “The Insult Was Extra Large”, New York Times:
      She said Penney’s “has always trafficked in knockoffs that aren’t quite up to Canal Street’s illegal standards”; “a good 96 percent” of the clothing is polyester; the racks are full of sizes 10, 12 and 16, but not Wilson’s 2; the petites department has plenty of clothing “for women nearly as wide as they are tall”; and the store “has the most obese mannequins I have ever seen.
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  52. pga
    • 2009 August 23, The Associated Press, “U.S. And Europe Tied”, New York Times:
      ¶Sergio García and Chris Riley were each at 13 under par through 10 holes to share the clubhouse lead when play was stopped midway through the third round of the rain-plagued Wyndham Championship in Greensboro, N.C. The round was scheduled to resume at 7:30 Sunday morning. pga
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  53. pietistic
    • 2009 August 23, “A Richard Poirier Reader: The Beatles and Parody, Capote and Narcissism”, New York Times:
      To put such items in combination makes it legitimate to ask, especially in an age that has recognized the real genius of Jean Genet, why a reputed genius like Capote, so bent in this instance on self-confession, has not had something more to say about a political culture that, by its pietistic hypocritical obsessions with private conduct, manages to direct attention time and again away from the glaringly visible disasters of social and political life.
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  54. pigginess
    • 2009 August 23, Alexander Star, “Richard Poirier: A Man of Good Reading”, New York Times:
      No less a figure than Saul Bellow later complained that Mr. Poirier had made the magazine “look like a butcher’s showcase, shining with pink hairless pigginess, and adorned with figures of hand-carved suet which represent the very latest in art, literature and politics.”
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  55. prelicensing
    • 2009 August 23, Bob Tedeschi, “Monitoring Loan Officers”, New York Times:
      It also requires mortgage brokers and loan originators who work for state-chartered banks to complete at least 20 hours of prelicensing education, pass a licensing test and complete eight hours of continuing education annually.
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  56. prepuzio *
    • 2009 August 23, Richard B. Woodward, “Book Review: 'An Irreverent Curiosity'”, New York Times:
      What he couldn’t have known until he and his wife moved to Calcata in 2006 and attempted to solve the mystery of the missing prepuce, or prepuzio in Italian, is just how outlandish the truth would turn out to be.
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  57. presmoked
    • 2009 August 23, “Smoked Bluefish Pâté”, New York Times:
      1/2 pound smoked bluefish (presmoked, grilled or leftovers from the Dijonnaise may be used)
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  58. pseudoslaves
  59. racebikes
    • 2009 August 23, Dexter Ford, “Slip-Sliding Suspended”, New York Times:
      Powerful engines and sticky tires make high-side accidents a threat on modern racebikes.
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  60. readoption
    • 2009 August 23, Lucinda Rosenfeld, “Multiple Lives”, New York Times:
      Objectively, Miles realizes that Hayden is insane and past the point of rescue or readoption into mainstream society.
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  61. riceless
    • 2009 August 23, M. H. Reed, “East and West in a Complex Fusion”, New York Times:
      Listed within them are dishes for vegetarians and for diners who prefer cooked fish or riceless rolls.
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  62. saltatrix
    • 2009 August 23, Sam Sifton, “Something Fishy”, New York Times:
      Alan Davidson, the British seafood don, says much the same in his indispensable “North Atlantic Seafood,” albeit in a different accent: “It does not keep very well,” reads Davidson’s entry for Pomatomus saltatrix, “but, if bought and cooked with dispatch, offers firm flesh of an excellent taste.”
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  63. seaswept
    • 2009 August 23, Matthew Gurewitsch, “For Vivaldi, Many More Seasons”, New York Times:
      ALTHOUGH Antonio Vivaldi ’s name is synonymous with seaswept Venice, an accident of history has deposited the greatest collection of his music here, by the foothills of the Alps.
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  64. solicitious
  65. spindlework
    • 2009 August 23, Christopher Gray, “The President Was Here (Grant, That Is)”, New York Times:
      George Landers, a manufacturer from New Britain, Conn., built No. 51, with porch-fence cutouts of horses, rabbits and swans; tiny dragon heads lunge out from the delicate spindlework.
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  66. steinbok
    • 2009 August 23, Thomas L. Friedman, “Connecting Nature’s Dots”, New York Times:
      Well, over here — the hyenas were dragging a “kill,” probably a small antelope or steinbok, which is very obvious from the smooth foot-wide path in the sand that ran some 50 yards into the bushes.
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  67. swingarm
    • 2009 August 23, Dexter Ford, “A Chopper in Looks but a Honda Inside”, New York Times:
      The shaft-drive system is similarly tucked away, sculptured to resemble a slender swingarm and traditional drum brake.
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  68. thebest
    • 2009 August 23, David Leonhardt, “Theory and Morality in the New Economy”, New York Times:
      In “The Cost of Capitalism,” Robert J. Barbera, a longtime Wall Street economist, notes that Greenspan and others confused the fact that market capitalism was thebest economic system with the misguided notion that it was the perfect system.
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  69. toked
    • 2009 August 23, Walter Kirn, “Drugs to Do, Cases to Solve”, New York Times:
      This keeps Doc’s workload relatively light, freeing him to stay stoned around the clock and live in the now, which isn’t hard for him, because he’s toked away his short-term memory.
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  70. transcriptive
    • 2009 August 23, Helen Vendler, “The Plain Sense of Things”, New York Times:
      Because of his fierce reticence (rather like that of Emily Dickinson , whom he admired), Stevens wrote symbolic rather than transcriptive poetry.
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  71. twistings
    • 2009 August 23, Alexander Star, “Richard Poirier: A Man of Good Reading”, New York Times:
      Tracing Emerson’s famous twistings and turnings, Mr. Poirier argued that even when he seemed most complacent, for instance in his notorious observation, “Do not tell me, as a good man did today, of my obligation to put all poor men in good situations.
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  72. unassimilably
    • 2009 August 23, Fernanda Eberstadt, “Untamed Creature”, New York Times:
      Although for the rest of her life fellow Brazilians regarded Lispector as unassimilably alien, she herself was adamant in claiming Brazil as her soul’s true home, the only place on earth where she could breathe free.
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  73. unsatisfyingly
  74. untomboyish
    • 2009 August 23, Porochista Khakpour, “Finally ‘Thirtysomething’?”, New York Times:
      I sucked my cheeks in to make cheekbones in photos; I loved shoulder-padded power suits and pumps rather than hypercolor T-shirts and graffitied Keds; fruitlessly pleaded for Lee Press-On Nails when all the girls were busy begging for crimping irons; and preferred male company to female company for mostly untomboyish reasons.
      add
  75. whateverfish
    • 2009 August 23, Sam Sifton, “Something Fishy”, New York Times:
      He paused again, then concluded: “Dude, if bluefish was called the Bahamian, I don’t know, whateverfish?
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  76. wheelspin
    • 2009 August 23, Dexter Ford, “Slip-Sliding Suspended”, New York Times:
      A computer detects wheelspin and reduces power.
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  77. woodys

Sequestered[edit]

  1. absentium
    • 2009 August 23, Lucinda Rosenfeld, “Multiple Lives”, New York Times:
      Here, Chaon deftly shows us how a mentally ill sibling, even one in absentium, can continue to dominate the “normal” members of his family, preventing them from getting on with their own lives.
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