User:Visviva/NYT 20090830

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-08-30 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-08-30).

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164163 tokens ‧ 114840 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 12669 types ‧ 95 (~ 0.75%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-08-30[edit]

  1. acronymists
    • 2009 August 30, William Safire, “Clunkers”, New York Times:
      In 1990, amendments to the Clean Air Act urged states to come up with market-based incentives to improve air quality; they were called accelerated vehicle retirement programs (A.V.R.), which Bush the Elder’s acronymists presented as “Customer Assistance to Recycle and Save” (CARS).
      add
  2. aeks
  3. amasake
    • 2009 August 30, Jan Ellen Spiegel, “The Farmers Are Local, the Products Exotic”, New York Times:
      At The Bridge in Middletown, tofu made from organic soybeans grown in upstate New York, seitan and amasake are the only products and have kept the company in business for more than 30 years.
      add
  4. arrangment
    • 2009 August 30, Christopher Jensen, “Much Ado About Another Do-Over”, New York Times:
      Some people may like this hunkered-down arrangment, but in any case the open feeling of the previous models is gone.
      add
  5. barefootlike
    • 2009 August 30, Amy Cortese, “Wiggling Their Toes at the Shoe Giants”, New York Times:
      Nike was first to market with the Nike Free, a flexible shoe for “barefootlike running” with less padding than the company’s typical offerings.
      add
  6. braciole *
    • 2009 August 30, Kelly Feeney, “It’s Fresh, Local and Elegant”, New York Times:
      The evening menu is more expensive, with substantial entrees like leg of lamb braciole ($28).
      add
  7. brotes *
    • 2009 August 30, Robert J. Shiller, “An Echo Chamber of Boom and Bust”, New York Times:
      With nothing more than a quick translation — brotes verdes, pousses vertes, grüne Sprösslinge, etc.
      add
  8. caninifying
    • 2009 August 30, Liesl Schillinger, “Smart Birds”, New York Times:
      And while she may hesitate to anthropomorphize the bird, she is unable to avoid, in one instance, caninifying it — comparing a brood of fledglings who landed on her lawn and uprooted her seedling carrots to playful Labrador puppies.
      add
  9. capshun
  10. coban
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Turkish Delights”, New York Times:
      Other cool dishes inspired by a hot Mediterranean climate include dense, lemony hummus spread on warm pita ($5.50) and coban salatasi, or shepherd salad, made with diced tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, green peppers, parsley and a brisk citrus dressing ($7.95).
      add
  11. corncake
  12. cotija
    • 2009 August 30, Joanne Starkey, “Latin Flavors That Fuse Tradition and Innovation”, New York Times:
      The namesake maize de cantina, one of the starters, is a big, sweet ear of local corn dripping with chipotle butter and glazed with melted cotija cheese.
      add
  13. countervision
    • 2009 August 30, Sam Tanenhaus, “In Kennedy, the Last Roar of the New Deal Liberal”, New York Times:
      Indeed, the peak years of Mr. Kennedy’s Senate career, the 1980s and ’90s, coincided with the ascendancy of a countervision, captured in Ronald Reagan ’s assertion: “Government is not the solution to our problem.
      add
  14. crabe *
  15. crespella *
    • 2009 August 30, Karla Cook, “Small, Eclectic and Laid Back”, New York Times:
      The inspiration was a fresh berry crespella (Italian-style crepe) loaded with luscious raspberries, blackberries and strawberries, along with buttery sautéed apples and a sprig of fresh mint.
      add
  16. crowdsource
    • 2009 August 30, William Safire, “Clunkers”, New York Times:
      And I sometimes “crowdsource,” asking for help in research from the Lexicographic Irregulars (like when I asked for sign-language suggestions for “thanks” and learned how the little Dutch boy felt when he pulled his finger out of the dike).
      add
  17. delinquensy
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      Among them, as he wrote in the 1977 profile in The Times, were “jooveniel delinquensy, criem-in-th-streets, hard cor unemploiment and poverty.”
      add
  18. depreciable
    • 2009 August 30, Bill Bradley, “Tax Reform’s Lesson for Health Care Reform”, New York Times:
      When my turn came, I said, “Mr. President, I know you’re interested in tax reform because when you were an actor, the marginal tax rate was 90 percent — and Mr. President, I’m interested in tax reform because when I was a basketball player, I was a depreciable asset.”
      add
  19. deschooling -> deschool
    • 2009 August 30, Elsa Dixler, “Yesterday”, New York Times:
      Her account of that experience, and her critique of the radical deschooling ideas of Ivan Illich, are worth a small book themselves.
      add
  20. doansburg
  21. downtowners -> downtowner
    • 2009 August 30, Allen Salkin, “For Him, the Web Was No Safety Net”, New York Times:
      He began giving parties in a loft on Broadway at Houston Street, with artists, techies and other downtowners.
      add
  22. draens
  23. drouzy
  24. dul *
  25. emptyd
  26. eo *
  27. everyguy
    • 2009 August 30, Dennis Lim, “Men at Work: Finding Humor in Missteps”, New York Times:
      Played by Jason Bateman (in quintessential everyguy mode), Joel Reynold is the beleaguered owner of a flavor-extract factory, contending with difficult employees, a looming lawsuit over an assembly-line mishap, a distant wife (Kristen Wiig ) and his own adulterous urges.
      add
  28. evrybody
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      “Foenetic speling wil maek reeding and rieting neerly automatic for evrybody,” Mr. Rondthaler wrote in SoundSpel, in a passage quoted by The New York Times in a 1977 profile.
      add
  29. firstavenueplayhouse
    • 2009 August 30, “Events in New Jersey”, New York Times:
      First Avenue Playhouse, 123 First Avenue. firstavenueplayhouse
      add
  30. fllac
  31. fraise *
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Popular French Charm (Some Springsteen, Too)”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKED Crab beignets, Toscane pizzette, fried zucchini blossoms with goat cheese (special), mussels with white wine and garlic, mussels with curry sauce and apple, duck confit salad, pan-fried skate wing with caper-butter sauce, apple tart, profiteroles, fraise melba.
      add
  32. francese *
    • 2009 August 30, Karla Cook, “Small, Eclectic and Laid Back”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKE Artichoke francese, ahi tuna with herbs and quail egg, arugula with goat-cheese fritter and wild mushrooms, spinach salad with candied walnuts and blue cheese; baby back ribs with slaw, spring chicken, lemon chicken, seared tuna, pasta with artichokes and olives; fresh berry crespella, bananas Foster crespella.
      add
  33. geezersphere
    • 2009 August 30, William Safire, “Clunkers”, New York Times:
      But its primary meaning is that of “old machinery that no longer works” — making that clunking sound reminding the geezersphere of a Fred Allen radio character saying “Duh” — and was applied to cars, buses, aircraft and even guns that were in advanced stages of dilapidation.
      add
  34. hakurei
    • 2009 August 30, Jan Ellen Spiegel, “The Farmers Are Local, the Products Exotic”, New York Times:
      Many foods that seem exotic for New England are turning up in small amounts at more and more farms: kohlrabi, hakurei turnips, okra, edamame, Jerusalem artichokes, ground cherries and quince.
      add
  35. hemlok
  36. japester
    • 2009 August 30, Jonathan Lethem, “Eyes Wide Open”, New York Times:
      Moore is an equal-opportunity japester: heroes and villains both crack wise with Chandleresque vivacity, so you can’t use cleverness as a moral index.
      add
  37. jooveniel
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      Among them, as he wrote in the 1977 profile in The Times, were “jooveniel delinquensy, criem-in-th-streets, hard cor unemploiment and poverty.”
      add
  38. kheera
    • 2009 August 30, Jan Ellen Spiegel, “The Farmers Are Local, the Products Exotic”, New York Times:
      Mr. Kandefer’s collection of the unusual includes Asian lemon grass; Roman mint, which looks like oregano and has a hint of lemon; bay trees for fresh versions of the leaves that most people have only had dried; brown Indian cucumbers called poona kheera and Sikkim; and, among his many peppers, a super-hot variety with black seeds called manzano and a white and green variegated one, the size of a jalapeño, called a fish hot, which some say is the secret ingredient in Old Bay seasoning.
      add
  39. kisir
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Turkish Delights”, New York Times:
      Cold appetizers — to eat in or to take out — include lebni, a blend of smooth and tangy yogurt, walnuts, fresh dill, olive oil and garlic; kisir, a lively mixture of cracked wheat, tomatoes, scallions, parsley, walnuts, mint and olive oil; and soslu patlican, a delicious chilled stew of fried eggplant, tomatoes, peppers and garlic (all are $5.50).
      add
  40. lebni
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Turkish Delights”, New York Times:
      Cold appetizers — to eat in or to take out — include lebni, a blend of smooth and tangy yogurt, walnuts, fresh dill, olive oil and garlic; kisir, a lively mixture of cracked wheat, tomatoes, scallions, parsley, walnuts, mint and olive oil; and soslu patlican, a delicious chilled stew of fried eggplant, tomatoes, peppers and garlic (all are $5.50).
      add
  41. maek
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      “Foenetic speling wil maek reeding and rieting neerly automatic for evrybody,” Mr. Rondthaler wrote in SoundSpel, in a passage quoted by The New York Times in a 1977 profile.
      add
  42. manzano *
    • 2009 August 30, Jan Ellen Spiegel, “The Farmers Are Local, the Products Exotic”, New York Times:
      Mr. Kandefer’s collection of the unusual includes Asian lemon grass; Roman mint, which looks like oregano and has a hint of lemon; bay trees for fresh versions of the leaves that most people have only had dried; brown Indian cucumbers called poona kheera and Sikkim; and, among his many peppers, a super-hot variety with black seeds called manzano and a white and green variegated one, the size of a jalapeño, called a fish hot, which some say is the secret ingredient in Old Bay seasoning.
      add
  43. mavenhood
    • 2009 August 30, William Safire, “Clunkers”, New York Times:
      I am indebted to Markey’s staff for this insight into phrasal formation, but in the language mavenhood, you do not pay “cash for coinage.”
      add
  44. melba
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Popular French Charm (Some Springsteen, Too)”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKED Crab beignets, Toscane pizzette, fried zucchini blossoms with goat cheese (special), mussels with white wine and garlic, mussels with curry sauce and apple, duck confit salad, pan-fried skate wing with caper-butter sauce, apple tart, profiteroles, fraise melba.
      add
  45. microcharges
  46. minit *
  47. mudlike
    • 2009 August 30, Shaila Dewan, “Clash in Alabama Over Tennessee Coal Ash”, New York Times:
      “That’s the means to their end, that they can keep it out of black communities on the charge of environmental racism,” said Albert Turner Jr., a black county commissioner, inviting a visitor to sniff a sample of the heavy, mudlike ash in a souvenir glass jar.
      add
  48. neerly
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      “Foenetic speling wil maek reeding and rieting neerly automatic for evrybody,” Mr. Rondthaler wrote in SoundSpel, in a passage quoted by The New York Times in a 1977 profile.
      add
  49. nonacting

|passage=Even Tiny, the gang’s big, dumb muscle man, is “impressed” by their nonacting teamwork. }

  1. numnes
  2. oepiaet
  3. oque
    • 2009 August 30, Miranda Seymour, “Couples”, New York Times:
      Three Lives in Frances Belle oque
      add
  4. oraculous
    • 2009 August 30, Ben Ratliff, “Chanting, Jazzy, Beachy, Funky, Lonely Sounds”, New York Times:
      (In an answering-machine message included on the album, the Roots ’s drummer, Ahmir Thompson, best known as ?uestlove, calls it “all that oraculous, spaced-out, past-geometry, near-calculus stuff y’all be doing.”)
      add
  5. overcommunicate
    • 2009 August 30, “Stepping Out of the Sandbox”, New York Times:
      So I think I’ve learned to overcommunicate in a way that I never did before.
      add
  6. paens
  7. patlican
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Turkish Delights”, New York Times:
      Cold appetizers — to eat in or to take out — include lebni, a blend of smooth and tangy yogurt, walnuts, fresh dill, olive oil and garlic; kisir, a lively mixture of cracked wheat, tomatoes, scallions, parsley, walnuts, mint and olive oil; and soslu patlican, a delicious chilled stew of fried eggplant, tomatoes, peppers and garlic (all are $5.50).
      add
  8. pizzetta *
    • 2009 August 30, Kelly Feeney, “It’s Fresh, Local and Elegant”, New York Times:
      For lunch, you can sit in the airy dining room or at a table outside and order an arugula salad with peaches, almond brittle and goat cheese ($11), for example, or a fig pizzetta with prosciutto, caramelized onions, Gorgonzola and white truffle oil ($13).
      add
  9. pizzette *
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Popular French Charm (Some Springsteen, Too)”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKED Crab beignets, Toscane pizzette, fried zucchini blossoms with goat cheese (special), mussels with white wine and garlic, mussels with curry sauce and apple, duck confit salad, pan-fried skate wing with caper-butter sauce, apple tart, profiteroles, fraise melba.
      add
  10. pizzettes
  11. poona
    • 2009 August 30, Jan Ellen Spiegel, “The Farmers Are Local, the Products Exotic”, New York Times:
      Mr. Kandefer’s collection of the unusual includes Asian lemon grass; Roman mint, which looks like oregano and has a hint of lemon; bay trees for fresh versions of the leaves that most people have only had dried; brown Indian cucumbers called poona kheera and Sikkim; and, among his many peppers, a super-hot variety with black seeds called manzano and a white and green variegated one, the size of a jalapeño, called a fish hot, which some say is the secret ingredient in Old Bay seasoning.
      add
  12. poruwa
    • 2009 August 30, “Manisha Corea, Lincoln Wilson”, New York Times:
      Buddhi Abeyasekera, a member of the New York Buddhist Vihara, a temple, and a friend of the bride’s family, performed a traditional Sri Lankan poruwa ceremony.
      add
  13. positraction
    • 2009 August 30, Rex Roy, “Surfers Met Rodders, and a Genre Was Born”, New York Times:
      The Little Deuce Coupe catapulted to fame amid a flood of car songs that glorified the performance of everything from a fuel-injected Sting Ray Corvette to a dual-quad positraction 409-cubic-inch Chevy.
      add
  14. pousses *
    • 2009 August 30, Robert J. Shiller, “An Echo Chamber of Boom and Bust”, New York Times:
      With nothing more than a quick translation — brotes verdes, pousses vertes, grüne Sprösslinge, etc.
      add
  15. productve
    • 2009 August 30, Roslyn Sulcas, “Building a Profile for City Center: Dance Mecca”, New York Times:
      (Another partnership, with Carnegie Hall , has been less productve, although Ms. Shuler says the organizations continue to talk about projects.)
      add
  16. promiseless
    • 2009 August 30, Jonathan Lethem, “Eyes Wide Open”, New York Times:
      It appeared to clinch a deal, and was meant to sound the same as the more soldierly Good to go, except it was promiseless — mere affirmative description.”
      add
  17. rageful
    • 2009 August 30, Jonathan Lethem, “Eyes Wide Open”, New York Times:
      She’s a discomfiting, sometimes even rageful writer, lurking in the disguise of an endearing one.
      add
  18. reeding -> reed
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      “Foenetic speling wil maek reeding and rieting neerly automatic for evrybody,” Mr. Rondthaler wrote in SoundSpel, in a passage quoted by The New York Times in a 1977 profile.
      add
  19. riet *
  20. rieting
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      “Foenetic speling wil maek reeding and rieting neerly automatic for evrybody,” Mr. Rondthaler wrote in SoundSpel, in a passage quoted by The New York Times in a 1977 profile.
      add
  21. rollerball
    • 2009 August 30, Laurie Winer, “Keeping Score”, New York Times:
      The office is full of rumpled clothes and bad haircuts; it’s an operation at which rollerball pens fall outside the budget limit (Bics for everyone!)
      add
  22. salatasi
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Turkish Delights”, New York Times:
      Other cool dishes inspired by a hot Mediterranean climate include dense, lemony hummus spread on warm pita ($5.50) and coban salatasi, or shepherd salad, made with diced tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, green peppers, parsley and a brisk citrus dressing ($7.95).
      add
  23. sens * -> sen
  24. soslu
    • 2009 August 30, Alice Gabriel, “Turkish Delights”, New York Times:
      Cold appetizers — to eat in or to take out — include lebni, a blend of smooth and tangy yogurt, walnuts, fresh dill, olive oil and garlic; kisir, a lively mixture of cracked wheat, tomatoes, scallions, parsley, walnuts, mint and olive oil; and soslu patlican, a delicious chilled stew of fried eggplant, tomatoes, peppers and garlic (all are $5.50).
      add
  25. speling
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      “Foenetic speling wil maek reeding and rieting neerly automatic for evrybody,” Mr. Rondthaler wrote in SoundSpel, in a passage quoted by The New York Times in a 1977 profile.
      add
  26. sunsetting
    • 2009 August 30, Jonathan Lethem, “Eyes Wide Open”, New York Times:
      Above and around us green leaves would flash wet with sunsetting light.
      add
  27. surfy
  28. thingliness
    • 2009 August 30, Jonathan Lethem, “Eyes Wide Open”, New York Times:
      The wrinkly recursiveness of her language seems lodged at the layer of consciousness itself, where Moore demands readers’ attention to the innate thingliness of words.
      add
  29. tipless

|passage=The reader is pulled along, feeling rage when the Gristedes manager pokes at him with a stick “sometimes, it seemed, just for fun”; shame when the young man goes tipless, day after day, delivering groceries to Park Avenue. }

  1. uncommunication
    • 2009 August 30, Jonathan Lethem, “Eyes Wide Open”, New York Times:
      This includes not only their plastic capacity as puns, and the oddnesses residing in the names for food, foliage and products — for instance, the fact that probably no bachelor ever wore the flowers called “bachelor buttons,” or that a fabric’s neutral hue can be awarded names as various as pigeon, parmesan, platinum or pebble — but also their potential use as deliberate uncommunication: “ ‘Sounds good,’ I sang out into the dark of the car.
      add
  2. underserving
    • 2009 August 30, “Reading File”, New York Times:
      Harrison Ford in the Tom Clancy movies would never torture wholly innocent and underserving [sic] victims for the same reasons he wouldn’t beat his kids or hurl racial epithets at black people.
      add
  3. unemploiment
    • 2009 August 30, Margalit Fox, “Edward Rondthaler, Foenetic Speler, Dies at 104”, New York Times:
      Among them, as he wrote in the 1977 profile in The Times, were “jooveniel delinquensy, criem-in-th-streets, hard cor unemploiment and poverty.”
      add
  4. unitasker
    • 2009 August 30, Ruth Pennebaker, “The Mediocre Multitasker”, New York Times:
      Even with scientific validation at his fingertips, Mr. Leleux frets that the Stanford study may have been done “by a bitter unitasker like me who wants to validate his own existence.”
      add
  5. unitasking
    • 2009 August 30, Ruth Pennebaker, “The Mediocre Multitasker”, New York Times:
      As a child, Mr. Leleux recalls, his unitasking took a culinary turn.
      add
  6. unsavvy
  7. unstaffed
    • 2009 August 30, The Associated Press, “Indian Moon Orbiter Loses Contact”, New York Times:
      NEW DELHI (AP) — India ’s national space agency said that communications with its first unstaffed spacecraft to orbit the moon were lost on Saturday and that its scientists were no longer controlling the orbiter.
      add
  8. unsuit
    • 2009 August 30, Randy Cohen, “Keeping Score”, New York Times:
      If your patient does indeed have “cognitive defects” so dire as to unsuit him for this job, this should be revealed through the rough-and-tumble of campaigning.
      add
  9. verdes *
    • 2009 August 30, Robert J. Shiller, “An Echo Chamber of Boom and Bust”, New York Times:
      With nothing more than a quick translation — brotes verdes, pousses vertes, grüne Sprösslinge, etc.
      add
  10. vertes *
    • 2009 August 30, Robert J. Shiller, “An Echo Chamber of Boom and Bust”, New York Times:
      With nothing more than a quick translation — brotes verdes, pousses vertes, grüne Sprösslinge, etc.
      add
  11. vues *
    • 2009 August 30, Dave Kehr, “French Innovation at Cinema’s Dawn”, New York Times:
      The device was modeled on one developed by the Lumiére brothers of Lyon that allowed the filming of “vues animées”: photographs that seemed to move.
      add
  12. wae
  13. waitlisted -> waitlist
    • 2009 August 30, “A Long Road to Television”, New York Times:
      I applied to M.I.T. I had an admission interview with Roger Borovoy, an alumnus, and was waitlisted.
      add
  14. wheelman
    • 2009 August 30, Marilyn Stasio, “Dortmunder’s Farewell”, New York Times:
      Doug Fairkeep, a producer of such shows, loves the idea when he hears it from the nice lady cab driver (mother of the gang’s longtime wheelman, Stan Murch) who picks him up at Kennedy Airport .
      add
  15. whitecapped
    • 2009 August 30, Laura M. Holson, “A Dip Into Hollywood”, New York Times:
      And Ms. Davies’s 7,000-square-foot guesthouse, the only building from the original estate to survive, is already a favorite among card-playing foursomes and others who want to lounge on the second-story deck and watch dolphins bob in the whitecapped waves.
      add
  16. wuud
  17. yuca *

Sequestered[edit]