User:Visviva/NYT 20090927

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-09-27 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-09-27).

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172050 tokens ‧ 55 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 55 types ‧ 55 (~ 100%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-09-27[edit]

  1. aadmi
  2. aircraftlike
  3. amours *
    • 2009 September 27, Liesl Schillinger, “Probing the Charred Ruins of Romance”, New York Times:
      As so often happens in the retelling of grand and not-so-grand amours alike, her re-creation of the affair is trite and teeny-boppery, an effect magnified by her inclusion of scrapbook snapshots — her puffy first boyfriend (“giving up my virginity was special”); a 1972 wedding snap of “Sheryl and Ronnie” (they are still married); a shot of the Upper East Side snuggery where she and Bernie hooked up; and a collage of the “iconic” lipstick building where she and Bernie first met.
      add
  4. anthemion
    • 2009 September 27, Christopher Gray, “Where Lincoln Tossed and Turned”, New York Times:
      Only a small temple front on the Broadway side, with two Doric columns and a precisely carved anthemion crest, distinguished Astor’s 309-room project from a government storehouse.
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  5. asado *
    • 2009 September 27, Karla Cook, “Robust Flavors and Happy Music”, New York Times:
      A sampling of both the flank steak stew (ropa vieja) and the roasted suckling pig (lechón asado) were dry, as were the beans and rice.
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  6. batterymate
    • 2009 September 27, Ben Shpigel, “Yankees Beat Red Sox and Can Clinch A.L. East on Sunday”, New York Times:
      Sabathia set down the first 11 hitters, benefiting from a superb third-inning catch by Melky Cabrera at the center-field fence to rob Jed Lowrie, before walking his old Cleveland batterymate, Victor Martinez, with two outs in the fourth.
      add
  7. brownstoners
    • 2009 September 27, Clifford J. Levy, “Brooklyn, Meet Your Oligarch”, New York Times:
      By the way, Brooklyn, with its striking diversity and population of 2.5 million people, encompasses a whole lot more than brownstoners and Russian immigrants (who may be simply the ones who draw more of Mr. Prokhorov’s attention).
      add
  8. btrfli
    • 2009 September 27, Paul Tough, “Can the Right Kinds of Play Teach Self-Control?”, New York Times:
      Then they captioned each one, first drawing a series of horizontal lines under the pictures, one for each word, and then writing out each word, or an approximation thereof: For “butterfly,” Abigail wrote “btrfli.”
      add
  9. chem *
    • 2009 September 27, Randy Cohen, “Grading the Ratings”, New York Times:
      And to salaries for the staff, beakers for the chem lab and trombones for the band.
      add
  10. chhole
  11. cobblestoned
    • 2009 September 27, Alison Gregor, “A New Neighborhood? That’s What They Say”, New York Times:
      They maintain that the northwest is distinguished from the rest by its warehouse architecture, lack of retail and office buildings, and cobblestoned streets.
      add
  12. cryptococcal
    • 2009 September 27, Donald G. Mcneil Jr., “If AIDS Went the Way of Smallpox”, New York Times:
      People with AIDS tend to die after years of suffering, often screaming from the agony of cryptococcal meningitis or choking on thrush fungus.
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  13. encapsulants
    • 2009 September 27, Anne Eisenberg, “Solar Power, Without All Those Panels”, New York Times:
      The cells are held in place and sealed from moisture by a clear plastic protective layer made by DuPont , said Stephen L. Cluff, DuPont’s global business director for photovoltaic encapsulants.
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  14. exterminationist
    • 2009 September 27, “The New Israel Lobby”, New York Times:
      Until Israel’s critics figure out how to acknowledge the pain and suffering resulting from Palestinian terrorism and exterminationist rhetoric, by pointing the Palestinians and the Arabs toward real change, they will fail to sway those Israelis and Jews that are ready to take a shot at reconciliation.
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  15. flutonette
    • 2009 September 27, Nate Chinen, “Mature and Focused Sets, With Breaks for Playtime”, New York Times:
      In addition to tenor he plays bass saxophone, flute and what he calls a flutonette (a flute with a clarinet mouthpiece), employing all manner of gentle clucks and multiphonic sighs.
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  16. hearbeat
    • 2009 September 27, Cara Buckley, “Westchester: Teenage Drug Abuse on Rise”, New York Times:
      Increasing numbers of high school students have been suffering from prescription drug episodes at school, Ms. Morehouse said, rapid hearbeat and passing out in the cafeteria.
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  17. hypercorrective
    • 2009 September 27, Jack Rosenthal, “Phantonym”, New York Times:
      You need not be a hypercorrective schoolmarm to lament such tolerance.
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  18. indoorsy
    • 2009 September 27, Lois Smith Brady, “Jolie Coursen and Jeff Kass”, New York Times:
      Once “indoorsy,” she now spends more time outdoors, though she still calls any walk in the woods “mountain climbing.”
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  19. ktipiti
    • 2009 September 27, Patricia Brooks, “Accents of Greece, Behind a French Name”, New York Times:
      This consists of piping-hot toasted pita bread with a picture-pretty display of four zesty spreads: hummus, ktipiti (hot pepper, feta cheese and olive oil), taramosalata (carp caviar) and melzanosalata (an eggplant, peppers and vinegar dish also known as melitzanes salata).
      add
  20. lookin
    • 2009 September 27, Deborah Sontag, “When Life Names You Lemon ...”, New York Times:
      He first saw Mr. Andersen’s “great talent” in “Def Poetry” and considers him “a very funny, poignant storyteller” and “a unique voice from the greatest borough — Brooklyn good lookin.’
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  21. masitas
    • 2009 September 27, Karla Cook, “Robust Flavors and Happy Music”, New York Times:
      Cubanu is a place to go with a craving — say, for masitas de puerco, tender little fried pork chunks in garlic-caramelized-onion sauce, laid against a hillock of black beans and rice.
      add
  22. melitzanes
    • 2009 September 27, Patricia Brooks, “Accents of Greece, Behind a French Name”, New York Times:
      This consists of piping-hot toasted pita bread with a picture-pretty display of four zesty spreads: hummus, ktipiti (hot pepper, feta cheese and olive oil), taramosalata (carp caviar) and melzanosalata (an eggplant, peppers and vinegar dish also known as melitzanes salata).
      add
  23. melzanosalata
    • 2009 September 27, Patricia Brooks, “Accents of Greece, Behind a French Name”, New York Times:
      This consists of piping-hot toasted pita bread with a picture-pretty display of four zesty spreads: hummus, ktipiti (hot pepper, feta cheese and olive oil), taramosalata (carp caviar) and melzanosalata (an eggplant, peppers and vinegar dish also known as melitzanes salata).
      add
  24. multibuttoned
    • 2009 September 27, Arthur Krystal, “When Writers Speak”, New York Times:
      He’s wearing a suit and a multibuttoned vest that scrunches the top of his tie, making it poke out of his shirt like an old-fashioned cravat.
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  25. nondonor
    • 2009 September 27, Richard H. Thaler, “Opting in vs. Opting Out”, New York Times:
      So long as the costs of registering as a donor or a nondonor are low, the results should be similar.
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  26. nonhipster
    • 2009 September 27, Deborah Sontag, “When Life Names You Lemon ...”, New York Times:
      Mr. Andersen chose to be interviewed on the paved steps of El Puente community center in nonhipster Williamsburg, with the elevated subway clanking above and the reggaeton-booming cars rumbling by.
      add
  27. nonmonopolistic
  28. nonpreachy

|passage=“Ours is a nonpreachy approach to sustainable living,” said Lisa Schwartz, who owns the farm and makes prizewinning cheeses there. }

  1. phantonym
    • 2009 September 27, Jack Rosenthal, “Phantonym”, New York Times:
      Here’s a thought that might help: A word that means the opposite of another is an antonym; a word that looks as if it means one thing but means quite another could be called a phantonym, and warrants wariness.
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  2. phantonyms
    • 2009 September 27, Jack Rosenthal, “Phantonym”, New York Times:
      A simple concern for clarity should lead students of all ages to recognize and avoid phantonyms, lest they look unlettered — and lose SAT points.
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  3. pincered
    • 2009 September 27, Liesl Schillinger, “Probing the Charred Ruins of Romance”, New York Times:
      Now that’s a more productive question, one that can be laid on a slab and dissected, every shred of disappointment pincered up and held to the light for scrutiny, every bolus of misplaced hope put under the microscope.
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  4. pinchos
    • 2009 September 27, Patricia Brooks, “Accents of Greece, Behind a French Name”, New York Times:
      Other excellent starters were fork-tender marinated octopus (with garden herbs and extra virgin olive oil); seared scallops with creamed polenta in a sweet-edged citrus brown butter sauce; saganaki (salty Greek cheese compressed and grilled between bread slices); calamari Diavlo (with a tomato-based dip hyped with jalapeños and hot cherry peppers); and pinchos (strips of steak on skewers), which came with a snappy chimichurri dip.
      add
  5. prebuilts
    • 2009 September 27, Vivian Marino, “Scott E. Spector”, New York Times:
      We did all the design work for the tenants — those were the ultimate prebuilts.
      add
  6. pucklike
    • 2009 September 27, Karla Cook, “Robust Flavors and Happy Music”, New York Times:
      On both visits, the ubiquitous fried green plantain rounds (tostones) were heavy and almost too thick when hot, then became pucklike when cool.
      add
  7. puerco *
    • 2009 September 27, Karla Cook, “Robust Flavors and Happy Music”, New York Times:
      Cubanu is a place to go with a craving — say, for masitas de puerco, tender little fried pork chunks in garlic-caramelized-onion sauce, laid against a hillock of black beans and rice.
      add
  8. rachmones
    • 2009 September 27, “‘Why Are Jews Liberals?’”, New York Times:
      Jews are liberals because of rachmones, often translated as compassion, but really so much more.
      add
  9. roommateship
    • 2009 September 27, Joyce Cohen, “Roommates, Not B.F.F.’s”, New York Times:
      “I am surprised by how well the two other girls were able to meet my outrageous needs,” Ms. Schussel said, “especially by Sam’s ability to keep our friendship out of our roommateship most of the time.”
      add
  10. saganaki
    • 2009 September 27, Patricia Brooks, “Accents of Greece, Behind a French Name”, New York Times:
      Other excellent starters were fork-tender marinated octopus (with garden herbs and extra virgin olive oil); seared scallops with creamed polenta in a sweet-edged citrus brown butter sauce; saganaki (salty Greek cheese compressed and grilled between bread slices); calamari Diavlo (with a tomato-based dip hyped with jalapeños and hot cherry peppers); and pinchos (strips of steak on skewers), which came with a snappy chimichurri dip.
      add
  11. salata *
    • 2009 September 27, Patricia Brooks, “Accents of Greece, Behind a French Name”, New York Times:
      This consists of piping-hot toasted pita bread with a picture-pretty display of four zesty spreads: hummus, ktipiti (hot pepper, feta cheese and olive oil), taramosalata (carp caviar) and melzanosalata (an eggplant, peppers and vinegar dish also known as melitzanes salata).
      add
  12. semicovered
    • 2009 September 27, “A Potato Dish for Julia”, New York Times:
      Let them cook, semicovered, for 5 minutes, then uncovered for a couple minutes more, until nicely browned.
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  13. semiterminated
    • 2009 September 27, David Segal, “Enter the Recession’s Waiting Room”, New York Times:
      It is early September, and Mr. Salak and Mr. Strudthoff — the semiterminated and the semiterminator — are living parallel lives.
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  14. semiterminator
    • 2009 September 27, David Segal, “Enter the Recession’s Waiting Room”, New York Times:
      It is early September, and Mr. Salak and Mr. Strudthoff — the semiterminated and the semiterminator — are living parallel lives.
      add
  15. sharky
  16. snuggery
    • 2009 September 27, Liesl Schillinger, “Probing the Charred Ruins of Romance”, New York Times:
      As so often happens in the retelling of grand and not-so-grand amours alike, her re-creation of the affair is trite and teeny-boppery, an effect magnified by her inclusion of scrapbook snapshots — her puffy first boyfriend (“giving up my virginity was special”); a 1972 wedding snap of “Sheryl and Ronnie” (they are still married); a shot of the Upper East Side snuggery where she and Bernie hooked up; and a collage of the “iconic” lipstick building where she and Bernie first met.
      add
  17. squibber
    • 2009 September 27, Ben Shpigel, “Yankees Beat Red Sox and Can Clinch A.L. East on Sunday”, New York Times:
      In the fifth, after walking Mark Teixeira to load the bases with no outs, Matsuzaka avoided damage as only one ball — a squibber by Alex Rodriguez — was hit in fair territory.
      add
  18. starchitect
    • 2009 September 27, Vivian Marino, “Scott E. Spector”, New York Times:
      A. No, we don’t need to be a starchitect.
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  19. telecops
    • 2009 September 27, Mike Hale, “Smarts and Stiff Upper Lip in Times of War and Murder”, New York Times:
      As portrayed by the marvelous actor Michael Kitchen in the British series “Foyle’s War,” he is sometimes so reserved — not eerily quiet or threateningly quiet, just quiet — that he actually appears to be thinking, something few American telecops are likely to be accused of.
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  20. tippy
    • 2009 September 27, Cheryl Jensen, “Fanfare for the Working Van”, New York Times:
      Although the Transit Connect looks like a tall tippy box, it handles pretty much like a car.
      add
  21. tostones *
    • 2009 September 27, Karla Cook, “Robust Flavors and Happy Music”, New York Times:
      On both visits, the ubiquitous fried green plantain rounds (tostones) were heavy and almost too thick when hot, then became pucklike when cool.
      add
  22. unpleasable
    • 2009 September 27, Michael Almereyda, “Stepping Into the Skates of the Director”, New York Times:
      A perusal of “Little Girl Lost” reveals John Drew Barrymore (who died in 2004) as one of those looming, unpleasable fathers, subject to disappearing acts, alcoholic binges, irrational rages.
      add
  23. unshareable
  24. verlof *
    • 2009 September 27, Deborah Solomon, “Big Man on Campus”, New York Times:
      The word “furlough,” I recently read, comes from the Dutch word “verlof,” which means permission, as in soldiers’ getting permission to take a few days off.
      add
  25. waatching
    • 2009 September 27, Philip Galanes, “Drop-Off Mom: See Ya!”, New York Times:
      I spent the entire party waatching the girl — and even spent 15 minutes in the bathroom with her — which made it difficult to enjoy time with my daughter and our other guests.
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  26. wasasa
    • 2009 September 27, Karla Cook, “Robust Flavors and Happy Music”, New York Times:
      Mr. Martinez’s Worcestershire-based wasasa sauce turned a small dish of sautéed skirt steak with peppers and onions into a tasty stew that could have used more Cuban bread alongside; the hot portion delivered after we first sat down was long gone.
      add
  27. yuca *
    • 2009 September 27, Karla Cook, “Robust Flavors and Happy Music”, New York Times:
      All of it sits next to a bowl of fat slabs of yuca bathed in a mojo sauce of garlic, lime, olive oil and lard.
      add

Sequestered[edit]