User:Visviva/NYT 20091004

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-10-04 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-10-04).

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120818 tokens ‧ 57 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 57 types ‧ 57 (~ 100%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-10-04[edit]

  1. ageof
    • 2009 October 4, Deborah Solomon, “Daddy Sang Bass”, New York Times:
      You don’t need to worry about stamps anymore in the ageof e-mail.
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  2. albumis
    • 2009 October 4, Deborah Solomon, “Daddy Sang Bass”, New York Times:
      My favorite song on the albumis “Heartaches by the Number,” which you perform with Elvis Costello .
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  3. aleck
    • 2009 October 4, Charles Mcgrath, “On Comedy’s Flying Trapeze”, New York Times:
      But even in American middle schools now, there’s often a smart aleck or two who can do Mr. Cleese’s Silly Walk and know the Dead Parrot sketch by heart.
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  4. awww *
    • 2009 October 4, Pamela Paul, “Kid Stuff”, New York Times:
      First Michael Lewis, author of “Liar’s Poker,” hit the best-seller list with a memoir about the perils (and awww, rewards) of being a dad.
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  5. basterds
    • 2009 October 4, A. O. Scott, “Jewish History, Popcorn Included”, New York Times:
      The basterds themselves, to be sure, but even more so Shosanna, their unwitting co-conspirator, with her honey-blond hair, her African lover and her fangirl appreciation of cinema.
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  6. bienenstich
    • 2009 October 4, Christopher Brooks, “Hearty German Fare, and Beer”, New York Times:
      Save room for the bienenstich, vanilla custard with toasted almonds ($6).
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  7. bosque *
    • 2009 October 4, M. H. Reed, “A Trip Through Italy, With Some Surprises”, New York Times:
      The two that my table sampled were winners: one with sweet caramelized onions and one, called flor del bosque, with forest mushrooms covered in bubbling fontina punctuated by dollops of soft goat cheese.
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  8. bruschettas
    • 2009 October 4, David Corcoran, “Small Portions With Wine to Match”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKED Cheese plate, arugula salad, lamb sausage, grilled octopus, fries with pecorino and chili; all bruschettas and pizzas, scallops, pork tenderloin.
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  9. bundt
  10. butylhydroquinone
    • 2009 October 4, Pete Wells, “COOKING WITH DEXTER”, New York Times:
      With the fries and McNuggets, we enter the polysyllabic realm of ingredients I don’t keep in my kitchen: mono- and diglycerides, tertiary butylhydroquinone, a number of phosphates, dimethylpolysiloxane.
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  11. cacciatorino
    • 2009 October 4, David Corcoran, “Small Portions With Wine to Match”, New York Times:
      No worries: you invested only $6, and perhaps you’ll find that your next choice, a dense, cherry-scented Argentina malbec from Luigi Bosca ($5 for two ounces), is just right for the fine, blister-crusted eight-inch pizza with peppery cacciatorino sausage, arugula and mozzarella (a steal at $9).
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  12. carlike
  13. cartes *
    • 2009 October 4, “A Slave Named Gordon”, New York Times:
      Abolitionists exploited the new medium of photography, circulating “The Scourged Back” and other cartes de visite.
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  14. cellbound
    • 2009 October 4, Dennis Lim, “Looking at an Inmate, Seeing an Artist”, New York Times:
      Hardly a typical biopic, “Bronson” more or less takes place inside the head of its cellbound antihero (played by Tom Hardy), who also serves as the story’s narrator, appearing on a spotlighted stage as a sinister M.C. in burlesque makeup.
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  15. coxsackie
    • 2009 October 4, Lisa Sanders, M.D., “Unexplained Illness”, New York Times:
      The prolonged fever, the pink eyes and the presence of only a single ulcer — usually there are several — would make this an unusual case of coxsackie.
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  16. croony
    • 2009 October 4, Christopher Hitchens, “Fade to Black”, New York Times:
      But he is sternly instructed by Charlie to discard this, his only ace, and indeed if Emily even mentions “that croony nostalgia music” to pretend that he knows nothing of the subject.
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  17. depreciations
    • 2009 October 4, Devin Leonard, “Recession, You Look Familiar”, New York Times:
      In the late ’90s, Ms. Reinhart and Mr. Rogoff note, “Korea, Indonesia and Thailand, among others, were forced to go to the International Monetary Fund for gigantic bailout packages, but even this was not enough to stave off deep recessions and huge currency depreciations.”
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  18. dimethylpolysiloxane
    • 2009 October 4, Pete Wells, “COOKING WITH DEXTER”, New York Times:
      With the fries and McNuggets, we enter the polysyllabic realm of ingredients I don’t keep in my kitchen: mono- and diglycerides, tertiary butylhydroquinone, a number of phosphates, dimethylpolysiloxane.
      add
  19. dirtylike
  20. fontinella
    • 2009 October 4, M. H. Reed, “A Trip Through Italy, With Some Surprises”, New York Times:
      The easy-to-share $25 selection offers a choice of five from more than a dozen possibilities that include lean prosciutto, bresaola and hot or sweet soppressata (all dewy fresh — no dry end cuts or edges here) as well as cheeses like fontinella, provolone and Gorgonzola served at perfect temperatures.
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  21. fregula
    • 2009 October 4, M. H. Reed, “A Trip Through Italy, With Some Surprises”, New York Times:
      Herbed chicken, also too long in the oven, nonetheless came with harmonious sides of yielding fregula and sturdy chickpeas.
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  22. fter
    • 2009 October 4, Andy Borowitz, “The Scotsman”, New York Times:
      fter a first shot at comedy in which he was so visibly nervous that the audience started chanting “Iz knees are knockin!” he went back to the drawing board, inventing a character to play at a gong show in Glasgow.
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  23. gunking
    • 2009 October 4, Ariel Kaminer, “The Doors Are Open, So Snoop Away”, New York Times:
      Judging from a preview he gave me, 10 years have not dimmed his admiration for that “great people-watching machine,” nor softened his memory of what it took to, say, remove the polyurethane that was gunking up the mural.
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  24. hyperthymia
    • 2009 October 4, Jay Mcinerney, “Why Is She Smiling?”, New York Times:
      While that book revolved around a young man who suffers serious brain damage, the central figure of “Generosity” is a woman ostensibly afflicted with hyperthymia — an excess of happiness.
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  25. kaesespaetzle
    • 2009 October 4, Christopher Brooks, “Hearty German Fare, and Beer”, New York Times:
      (If you don’t know your kaesespaetzle from your krainer wurst, the menu also lists items in English.)
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  26. knockin
    • 2009 October 4, Andy Borowitz, “The Scotsman”, New York Times:
      fter a first shot at comedy in which he was so visibly nervous that the audience started chanting “Iz knees are knockin!” he went back to the drawing board, inventing a character to play at a gong show in Glasgow.
      add
  27. krainer
    • 2009 October 4, Christopher Brooks, “Hearty German Fare, and Beer”, New York Times:
      (If you don’t know your kaesespaetzle from your krainer wurst, the menu also lists items in English.)
      add
  28. mafaldine
    • 2009 October 4, M. H. Reed, “A Trip Through Italy, With Some Surprises”, New York Times:
      Among the many notable pastas, mafaldine, a narrow ribbon pasta with ruffled edges perfect for capturing sauce, snags the prize.
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  29. marbella
    • 2009 October 4, Christine Haughney, “Wedding Gifts for the Couple Who Have Everything”, New York Times:
      These and other kitchen items should all help with preparing and serving the “tuna tartare, rack of lamb, chicken marbella, broccoli kugel, tomato crisp and fresh fruit for dessert” that Ms. Trump posted about on Sept. 25.
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  30. mezza *
    • 2009 October 4, David Corcoran, “Small Portions With Wine to Match”, New York Times:
      Even though the mushroom risotto was salty and undercooked, and hanger steak was served bloody rather than medium-rare as ordered, two other mezza entrees, both from a blackboard of daily specials, were refined and superb: three good-size diver scallops in a voluptuous brandy-cream sauce, and pork tenderloin with top-of-the-season peach sections wrapped in prosciutto.
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  31. microbroadcast
    • 2009 October 4, Samantha M. Shapiro, “Can the Muppets Make Friends in Ramallah?”, New York Times:
      He started the channel — one of dozens of tiny mom-and-pop-style microbroadcast operations in the West Bank — in part so that he would have a venue, however small, from which to broadcast “Shara’a Simsim.”
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  32. moeurs
    • 2009 October 4, Michael Kimmelman, “The Polanski Case: A Gallic Shrug, Preserve of Artistes”, New York Times:
      A petition signed by French filmmakers in support of Mr. Polanski chose “une affaire de moeurs,” a case of morals, the Gallic equivalent of “yada yada,” to describe the various crimes Mr. Polanski committed.
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  33. monomaths
    • 2009 October 4, “Reading File”, New York Times:
      This is because the learning that creates would-be polymaths creates monomaths too and in overwhelming numbers.
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  34. mythopoeticized
    • 2009 October 4, Stacey D’Erasmo, “Glory Days”, New York Times:
      I lay around my Barnard dorm room listening to Nina Simone records and reading his first novel, “Forgetting Elena,” which takes place in a highly mythopoeticized version of Fire Island and nominally concerns a man with amnesia.
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  35. neo *
    • 2009 October 4, Jonathan Miles, “Tom Brady, Pretty in Pink?”, New York Times:
      When it comes to neo sports-bar cocktails, then, it seems best to avoid the attempts at liquid androgyny and stake a firm position: the rugged whiskey sour at Warren 77 (enlivened with a dash of port), or the Spa Cooler at Capitol City, a sunny, feminine mixture of açaí liqueur, lime juice, cucumber and mint.
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  36. nett *
    • 2009 October 4, “A Slave Named Gordon”, New York Times:
      On the back of them was printed: “The nett [sic] proceeds from the sale of these Photographs will be devoted to the education of colored people in the department of the Gulf now under the command of Maj. Gen. Banks.”
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  37. nighttown
    • 2009 October 4, Stacey D’Erasmo, “Glory Days”, New York Times:
      His second novel, “Nocturnes for the King of Naples,” opened with the most gorgeous evocation I have ever read of the 1970s gay male nighttown at New York’s old rotting piers, a twisted, rusting, metallic ruin of anonymous sex and unexpectedly sublime tableaus.
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  38. outpedant
    • 2009 October 4, Ammon Shea, “Error-Proof”, New York Times:
      So I say outpedant the pedants, and allow yourself to gluttonously revel in the linguistic improprieties of yore as you familiarize yourself with the nearly unique enormity of the gloriously mistaken heritage that our literature is comprised of.
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  39. peperonata *
    • 2009 October 4, David Corcoran, “Small Portions With Wine to Match”, New York Times:
      From a list of “sharing plates,” the standouts included homemade lamb sausage, bursting with lamb flavor and spicy with peperonata, and first-rate fries whose vivid potato character was made even more so with dustings of pecorino cheese and chili powder.
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  40. pretheater
    • 2009 October 4, Dorothy Spears, “A Curtain as Ambitious as Its Stage”, New York Times:
      One early rendering involved a system of fiber-optics that would enable the curtain to reflect the pretheater din of instruments tuning up through a succession of flickering lights.
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  41. ridotti *
    • 2009 October 4, Aileen Jacobson, “Music With a Touch of Theater”, New York Times:
      The nonprofit Ridotto organization is named after the ridotti, halls in Venice where visitors, wearing masks, gambled, socialized “and gathered for spirited discussions,” she said. Ms. Maimone wants each Ridotto concert to re-create the informal atmosphere and free flow of ideas of an Italian ridotto, she said.
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  42. rippchen
    • 2009 October 4, Christopher Brooks, “Hearty German Fare, and Beer”, New York Times:
      More enticing are the sauerbraten, marinated in red wine; a Kasseler rippchen (smoked pork chop); and the fork-tender schweinshaxe pork shank, the restaurant’s premier dish ($12.50 to $19.50).
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  43. rougly
    • 2009 October 4, Ariel Kaminer, “The Doors Are Open, So Snoop Away”, New York Times:
      Newtown Creek is one of rougly a zillion sites whose curtains will be pulled back on Oct. 10 and 11 as part of Open House New York , the annual weekend of urban exploration, architectural discovery and plain old voyeurism.
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  44. sauerbraten
    • 2009 October 4, Christopher Brooks, “Hearty German Fare, and Beer”, New York Times:
      More enticing are the sauerbraten, marinated in red wine; a Kasseler rippchen (smoked pork chop); and the fork-tender schweinshaxe pork shank, the restaurant’s premier dish ($12.50 to $19.50).
      add
  45. schiuma *
    • 2009 October 4, M. H. Reed, “A Trip Through Italy, With Some Surprises”, New York Times:
      WHAT WE LIKED Antipasti platter, pizza (tarts), mafaldine, orecchiette, sea scallops with corn risotto, salmon with black rice, bread pudding, schiuma, citrus cheesecake.
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  46. schweinshaxe
    • 2009 October 4, Christopher Brooks, “Hearty German Fare, and Beer”, New York Times:
      More enticing are the sauerbraten, marinated in red wine; a Kasseler rippchen (smoked pork chop); and the fork-tender schweinshaxe pork shank, the restaurant’s premier dish ($12.50 to $19.50).
      add
  47. singsongy
    • 2009 October 4, Susan Dominus, “The Health Care Monologues”, New York Times:
      In “Fires in the Mirror,” Smith lovingly evoked, in one monologue, every nuance of a Lubavitch woman’s singsongy storytelling; in another, the Rev. Al Sharpton ’s barking tribute to James Brown.
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  48. stereographer
    • 2009 October 4, Mekado Murphy, “Buzz and Woody Add a Dimension”, New York Times:
      One person charged with that task was Bob Whitehill, the lead stereographer.
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  49. stereographers
    • 2009 October 4, Mekado Murphy, “Buzz and Woody Add a Dimension”, New York Times:
      Without changing any of the film’s action, Pixar’s 3-D specialists, or stereographers, returned to each frame of the film and virtually placed a second camera next to the original, creating left-eye and right-eye views of the scene.
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  50. sunbiz
  51. superauthentic
    • 2009 October 4, Liam Daniel Pierce, “Oh, How Romantic (Until the Pirate Attack)”, New York Times:
      The outfit there, led by a man named Angelino who insisted on drinking wine while training, is superauthentic and super-romantic.
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  52. therecords
    • 2009 October 4, Deborah Solomon, “Daddy Sang Bass”, New York Times:
      He would play the songs for me on his guitar, and I sought out therecords in the years afterward.
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  53. timesin
    • 2009 October 4, Deborah Solomon, “Daddy Sang Bass”, New York Times:
      He also wrote the arrangements, which is very old school; a lot of timesin modern recordings people just bash things out.
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  54. unblindfolded
    • 2009 October 4, Randy Cohen, “Transportation Policies”, New York Times:
      I’m convinced that I’m a better driver blindfolded than my ex-wife folded — that can’t be right — or unblindfolded, but I’d hate to have to convince a traffic cop that this is so.
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  55. uncold
    • 2009 October 4, “On Language: Age of Undoing”, New York Times:
      George Orwell ’s “1984” introduced terms like “ungood” and “uncold,” the Newspeak versions of “bad” and “warm,” respectively.
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  56. unresponding
    • 2009 October 4, Willing Davidson, “Animal Magnetism”, New York Times:
      You could read this collection as a critique — of our celebrity culture, of the uses we make of unresponding creatures — and Millet is sufficiently thorough to layer these resonances in a satisfying way.
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  57. visite *
    • 2009 October 4, “A Slave Named Gordon”, New York Times:
      Abolitionists exploited the new medium of photography, circulating “The Scourged Back” and other cartes de visite.
      add

Sequestered[edit]