User:Visviva/NYT 20091007

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-10-07 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-10-07).

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77152 tokens ‧ 24 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 24 types ‧ 24 (~ 100%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-10-07[edit]

  1. bravas *
    • 2009 October 7, Eric Asimov, “A Place for Wine Without the Lecture”, New York Times:
      The food, overseen by Javier Ortega, who used to own Pintxos, a Basque restaurant on Greenwich Street, is likewise elemental: pristine oysters, charcuterie or classic tapas like chunks of octopus with potatoes; papas bravas, crisp yet puffy potato cubes adorned with a spicy aioli; and patamaca, little pieces of toast with juicy tomato and olive oil, crowned with Serrano ham.
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  2. divaesque
    • 2009 October 7, A. O. Scott, “Wallowing in Misery for Art’s Sake”, New York Times:
      (“Tell Me Who You Are”), about a wealthy Malian family in crisis, has some fascinating Almodóvarian overtones, and it is enlivened by the extravagant, divaesque dignity of Sokona Gakou in the role of a woman on the verge of a marital breakdown.
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  3. festivalism
    • 2009 October 7, A. O. Scott, “Wallowing in Misery for Art’s Sake”, New York Times:
      But this kind of polarization — a fight mostly among critics conducted in the name of the artists and the audience — is itself another manifestation of festivalism.
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  4. festivalist
    • 2009 October 7, A. O. Scott, “Wallowing in Misery for Art’s Sake”, New York Times:
      But the festivalist mentality does not simply rest on a taste for depicting or witnessing human misery — social, sexual, economic and psychic.
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  5. fryings
    • 2009 October 7, Julia Moskin, “Fried Chicken: A Migratory Bird”, New York Times:
      Mr. Pemoulie said the chefs tried various types of flour, multiple fryings, turning the batter into foam, and adding vodka to it (that idea stuck).
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  6. fushimi
    • 2009 October 7, Julia Moskin, “Fried Chicken: A Migratory Bird”, New York Times:
      The mountain of chicken is accompanied to the table by four sauces; house-made Chinese-style mu shu pancakes for wrapping; and a bowl of raw vegetables like baby carrots, radishes and fushimi peppers, plus leaves of shiso, basil and mint.
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  7. gojuchang
  8. heartwarmer
    • 2009 October 7, Larry Dorman, “Amid Setbacks, Norman Focuses on Presidents Cup”, New York Times:
      As much as that, though, getting into the competition would be a way for him to change the channel from a story that suddenly switched from a heartwarmer to a heartbreaker.
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  9. homestyle
    • 2009 October 7, Florence Fabricant, “Off the Menu”, New York Times:
      TANUKI TAVERN More rustic than Ono, which it replaces, this homestyle Japanese restaurant has enough polished blond wood to call it sleek.
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  10. hypernatural
    • 2009 October 7, Eric Asimov, “A Place for Wine Without the Lecture”, New York Times:
      With their hypernatural viticulture and winemaking, they do not always know what the wine will taste like in the glass.
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  11. karaage
    • 2009 October 7, Julia Moskin, “Fried Chicken: A Migratory Bird”, New York Times:
      Although Japan’s culinary lexicon did not include deep frying until the Portuguese introduced it in the 16th century, the country now has at least three distinct fried chicken styles: katsu, with super-crisp panko or bread crumbs, is used for pounded breasts; karaage, ginger-and-garlic-marinated thighs in a light, puffy crust of sweet-potato starch; and Nagoya-style tebasaki, or wings.
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  12. meunier *
    • 2009 October 7, Eric Asimov, “A Place for Wine Without the Lecture”, New York Times:
      It offers few grand crus, first growths or trophy wines — unless, of course, your idea of a trophy is a brilliant Loire red made from the unlikely pinot meunier grape, like Le Rouge Est Mis from Thierry Puzelat.
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  13. minicranes
  14. noncriminals
    • 2009 October 7, Nina Bernstein, “Report Critical of Scope of Immigration Detention”, New York Times:
      Though the administration has indicated that it wants to concentrate immigration enforcement on serious criminal offenders, the report shows that one of the largest and fastest-growing segments of the population in detention is noncriminals picked up in the enforcement programs the government has embraced.
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  15. nonlabor
    • 2009 October 7, Jeremy W. Peters, “Paterson Orders Additional Cuts”, New York Times:
      The move will represent a decrease of about 11 percent in the agencies’ nonlabor costs like travel, vehicles, equipment and postage, the governor’s office said.
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  16. nuoc
    • 2009 October 7, Melissa Clark, “Risky Business in the Kitchen”, New York Times:
      I suppose I could have ditched the game, but I liked the idea of shrimp with nuoc mam, so I stuck with it.
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  17. patamaca
    • 2009 October 7, Eric Asimov, “A Place for Wine Without the Lecture”, New York Times:
      The food, overseen by Javier Ortega, who used to own Pintxos, a Basque restaurant on Greenwich Street, is likewise elemental: pristine oysters, charcuterie or classic tapas like chunks of octopus with potatoes; papas bravas, crisp yet puffy potato cubes adorned with a spicy aioli; and patamaca, little pieces of toast with juicy tomato and olive oil, crowned with Serrano ham.
      add
  18. prescandal
  19. shu *
    • 2009 October 7, Julia Moskin, “Fried Chicken: A Migratory Bird”, New York Times:
      The mountain of chicken is accompanied to the table by four sauces; house-made Chinese-style mu shu pancakes for wrapping; and a bowl of raw vegetables like baby carrots, radishes and fushimi peppers, plus leaves of shiso, basil and mint.
      add
  20. subprefecture
    • 2009 October 7, Adam Nossiter, “U.S. Condemns Mass Killings and Rape in Guinea”, New York Times:
      Captain Camara reacted angrily to these statements, telling reporters Monday that “Guinea is not a subprefecture, is not a neighborhood in France.”
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  21. tebasaki
    • 2009 October 7, Julia Moskin, “Fried Chicken: A Migratory Bird”, New York Times:
      Although Japan’s culinary lexicon did not include deep frying until the Portuguese introduced it in the 16th century, the country now has at least three distinct fried chicken styles: katsu, with super-crisp panko or bread crumbs, is used for pounded breasts; karaage, ginger-and-garlic-marinated thighs in a light, puffy crust of sweet-potato starch; and Nagoya-style tebasaki, or wings.
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  22. unanalytical
    • 2009 October 7, Roslyn Sulcas, “Reality and Illusion Meet, Sometimes Changing Places”, New York Times:
      After seeing Big Dance Theater’s “Comme Toujours Here I Stand,” at the Kitchen on Sunday night, several unanalytical thoughts crowded into my head: Why aren’t Annie-B Parson and Paul Lazar, who founded this company in 1991, more famous?
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  23. varnishkes
    • 2009 October 7, Joan Nathan, “At Jewish Delis, Times Are as Lean as Good Corned Beef”, New York Times:
      Zayda’s Kosher Deli in South Orange, N.J., is actually a supermarket that makes a line of kosher classics like kugels, chicken soup and kasha varnishkes sold at stores in the area like Shop-Rite, Fairway and Whole Foods.
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  24. vitreoretinal
    • 2009 October 7, “A Nation at Odds Over Health Care”, New York Times:
      Until today, in my practice as a vitreoretinal surgeon, I offered patients a choice of Avastin or Lucentis, sometimes remarking that Avastin is the socially responsible way to treat wet age-related macular degeneration.
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Sequestered[edit]