User:Visviva/NYT 20091011

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-10-11 issue of the New York Times which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-10-11).

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187694 tokens ‧ 65 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 65 types ‧ 65 (~ 100%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-10-11[edit]

  1. adefovir
    • 2009 October 11, Amy Zipkin, “On the Discovery Trail”, New York Times:
      I joined Gilead Sciences in 1990, and by 1999 we were in the final stage of about five or six years of work in creating the drug adefovir dipivoxil to treat H.I.V. The drug wasn’t approved by the F.D.A. for H.I.V. because the data showed evidence of kidney toxicity.
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  2. aleck
    • 2009 October 11, “Monty Python: It Lives On”, New York Times:
      Your article about “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” turning 40 noted, “But even in American middle schools now, there’s often a smart aleck or two who can do Mr. Cleese’s Silly Walk and know the Dead Parrot sketch by heart.”
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  3. badgeless
    • 2009 October 11, Neil Dunlop, “Badges? They Don’t Need ...”, New York Times:
      In Munich a while back, a man driving an expensive BMW 650i — its badge proudly displayed — was asked why so many cars went badgeless.
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  4. bassinette
  5. blogospheric
    • 2009 October 11, Ben Zimmer, “The Maven, Nevermore”, New York Times:
      In our blogospheric age we expect this type of colloquy with public intellectuals as a matter of course, but Safire proved to be a trendsetter in his affable accessibility.
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  6. buycotting
    • 2009 October 11, Anand Giridharadas, “Boycotts Minus the Pain”, New York Times:
      Proponents of buycotting see these premiums as pure political expression: citizens’ parting with money to refine the world.
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  7. chemicalized

|passage=The varieties of wheat grown in this country for industrial production are down to about five, so it’s all monoculture, chemicalized, no nutritional value,” said Ford, a serene, 43-year-old metalhead turned Deadhead who got his start as an accountant in a worker-owned Madison bakery. }

  1. cousinship
    • 2009 October 11, Nicholas Wade, “Evolution All Around”, New York Times:
      He describes a beautiful thought experiment to demonstrate a rabbit’s cousinship to a leopard.
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  2. crimestyles
    • 2009 October 11, John Schwartz, “Something From Nothing: My Madoff Fantasy”, New York Times:
      Some offer a glimpse of the good life that such financial shenanigans can buy — a sort of crimestyles of the rich and famous.
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  3. davis *
    • 2009 October 11, The Associated Press, “Cilic to Face Djokovic in Final”, New York Times:
      ¶The Spanish tennis federation announced that the best-of-five Davis Cup final between the defending champion Spain and the Czech Republic would be held Dec. 4 to 6 on the clay courts at the Palau Sant Jordi in Barcelona. davis
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  4. dementors
  5. deseeded
    • 2009 October 11, Deborah Solomon, “The Packaged-Food Guru”, New York Times:
      Take a peeled and deseeded butternut squash and cut it with a crinkle cutter, which makes them cuter and more French-fry-like.
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  6. destructivist
    • 2009 October 11, Deborah Sontag, “Beyond the Barrio, With Growing Pains”, New York Times:
      A practitioner of destructivist art in the 1960s, Mr. Ortiz had become well known for hacking up full-size pianos with an ax (including once on Johnny Carson ’s show).
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  7. dipivoxil
    • 2009 October 11, Amy Zipkin, “On the Discovery Trail”, New York Times:
      I joined Gilead Sciences in 1990, and by 1999 we were in the final stage of about five or six years of work in creating the drug adefovir dipivoxil to treat H.I.V. The drug wasn’t approved by the F.D.A. for H.I.V. because the data showed evidence of kidney toxicity.
      add
  8. discoverymuseum
    • 2009 October 11, “Events in Connecticut”, New York Times:
      The Discovery Museum, 4450 Park Avenue. discoverymuseum
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  9. disoproxil
    • 2009 October 11, Amy Zipkin, “On the Discovery Trail”, New York Times:
      Working in the antiviral chemistry division at Bristol-Myers Squibb , I was in charge of overseeing the science for the drug stavudine for H.I.V., and when we developed tenofovir disoproxil fumarate it replaced stavudine.
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  10. ergogenic
    • 2009 October 11, Gretchen Reynolds, “Will Drinking Make You Do It?”, New York Times:
      But my conclusion is that it just is not ergogenic in humans,” Cureton says.
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  11. extern *
    • 2009 October 11, Lee Siegel, “How Iago Explains the World”, New York Times:
      For when my outward action doth demonstrate The native act and figure of my heart In compliment extern, ’tis not long after But I will wear my heart upon my sleeve For daws to peck at: I am not what I am.
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  12. haaaard
  13. hostal
    • 2009 October 11, Stuart Emmrich, “100 Hotels Under $150”, New York Times:
      The hostal is located on the fourth floor of the building (with no elevator), but is only one block from the Plaza del Sol. — Rob Stolzer
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  14. hyperthymia
    • 2009 October 11, “Editors’ Choice”, New York Times:
      This novel’s central figure is a woman ostensibly afflicted with hyperthymia — an excess of happiness.
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  15. impropaganda
    • 2009 October 11, Ben Zimmer, “The Maven, Nevermore”, New York Times:
      So began William Safire ’s inaugural On Language column on Feb. 18, 1979, which promised to explore “new words, vogue phrases and the intriguing roots of everyday discourse — with occasionally crotchety observations on everything from proper usage to impropaganda.”
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  16. inedibles
    • 2009 October 11, Jonathan Safran Foer, “Against Meat”, New York Times:
      My grandmother survived World War II barefoot, scavenging Eastern Europe for other people’s inedibles: rotting potatoes, discarded scraps of meat, skins and the bits that clung to bones and pits.
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  17. limonata *
  18. locavoraciousness
    • 2009 October 11, Christine Muhlke, “Grain Elevator”, New York Times:
      Ford’s locavoraciousness has resulted in a rich community and satisfying, dare he say sustainable, life.
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  19. loopholing
    • 2009 October 11, Zz Packer, “No Polenta, No Cry”, New York Times:
      Relaxing the rules has meant hopscotching over some prohibitions and loopholing my way through others.
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  20. makesyou
    • 2009 October 11, Deborah Solomon, “The Packaged-Food Guru”, New York Times:
      Isn’t that a conflict of interest that makesyou potentially bribable?
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  21. mavenry
    • 2009 October 11, Ben Zimmer, “The Maven, Nevermore”, New York Times:
      May the memories of his mavenry live on.
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  22. midcaps
    • 2009 October 11, J. Alex Tarquinio, “Emerging Markets Make a Comeback”, New York Times:
      “We’ve owned Petrobras for a very long time,” Mr. Pangaro said, “but in the energy and materials sector, we generally focus on midcaps and small caps.”
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  23. museo *
  24. nadvori
    • 2009 October 11, Stuart Emmrich, “100 Hotels Under $150”, New York Times:
      80) Hotel Monastery Strahovske nadvori 13 (420-233) 090-200 www.hotelmonastery.cz 1,950 koruny (about $111 at 17.6 koruny to the dollar)
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  25. necesssarily
  26. noninterest
  27. nuoc
    • 2009 October 11, Karla Cook, “Succeeding Through Surprises”, New York Times:
      The idea is to layer the noodles, succulent meat and herb on a lettuce leaf, wrap it up, then dip it in nuoc mam (a vinegary fish sauce).
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  28. omosa
    • 2009 October 11, Karla Cook, “Succeeding Through Surprises”, New York Times:
      That description doesn’t define navel — it’s fatty beef from the belly area of the cow (omosa is tripe, also known as stomach).
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  29. overcut

|passage=Instead, Singh overcut his drive off the 18th tee and left Allenby with a very difficult shot. }

  1. overexuberant
    • 2009 October 11, Megan Mcardle, “Penny Pincher”, New York Times:
      Though one often hears calls for a “return to thrift,” our history of overexuberant consumption stretches back to colonial days, when the founders fretted that the colonists’ attraction to imported luxuries would undermine democratic self-rule.
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  2. overqualification
  3. patchoguetheatre
  4. phasey
  5. pizzo *
    • 2009 October 11, Anand Giridharadas, “Boycotts Minus the Pain”, New York Times:
      In 2004, some volunteers in Palermo decided to bypass politicians: they approached local businesses, many of which paid the mafia “pizzo,” or bribes, and asked them to certify that they paid pizzo no longer; in exchange, the Comitato brought them business from pizzo-averse Sicilians.
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  6. prefashionable
    • 2009 October 11, Manohla Dargis, “Deconstructing Cinema in Order to Reveal It”, New York Times:
      With Jack Smith, a film and performance artist, he did just that, shooting Smith frolicking in shorts like “Little Stabs at Happiness” (1958-60). Mr. Jacobs once described another of these films, “Blonde Cobra” (1959-63), edited from footage shot by Bob Fleischner, as a “look in on an exploding life, on a man of imagination suffering prefashionable Lower East Side deprivation and consumed with American 1950s, ’40s, ’30s disgust.”
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  7. prohibitionistic
    • 2009 October 11, Zz Packer, “No Polenta, No Cry”, New York Times:
      But by then I’d settled into a pattern of weird, wrecked eating in which I maintained a bizarre prohibitionistic list of foods I was never to touch.
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  8. quipper
    • 2009 October 11, Jim Dwyer, “What Not to Say In an Exit-Row Seat”, New York Times:
      Eric also said he would not identify the exit-door quipper, but the agents told him that unless he did, he, too, would be put off the flight.
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  9. ragtop
    • 2009 October 11, Paul Stenquist, “One Famous Racecar Goes Back to the Streets”, New York Times:
      After a four-decade odyssey that included dragstrips, restoration shops, auction houses and a private collection, the 450-horsepower ragtop may find fulfillment cruising in Southern California.
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  10. returnability
    • 2009 October 11, Scott Sturgis, “Manic Locks and Toasty Seats”, New York Times:
      Also, some vehicles may have what Chrysler called poor steering wheel returnability.
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  11. ridiculers
    • 2009 October 11, Mark Leibovich, “Another Fine Mess: Comics Whack Obama”, New York Times:
      As if trying to strike pre-emptively against inevitable ridiculers, Mr. Obama seemed eager to embrace the “I haven’t done anything yet” conceit in his Rose Garden remarks Friday morning.
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  12. saltand
    • 2009 October 11, Deborah Solomon, “The Packaged-Food Guru”, New York Times:
      Would that satisfy the desire for both saltand crunch?
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  13. sashimied
    • 2009 October 11, Anand Giridharadas, “Boycotts Minus the Pain”, New York Times:
      I could only assume that the tuna, before being sashimied, enjoyed a massage and that the fennel had signed consent forms to be crushed into ice cream.
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  14. sheetless
    • 2009 October 11, Allen Salkin, “Anybody Here From Astoria?”, New York Times:
      A stick of deodorant stood on his otherwise empty bookshelf, and his girlfriend from back home, Jenni Maple, sat with her laptop on his sheetless mattress, which touched the room’s walls on either end.
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  15. shirataki
  16. sporta *
  17. stavudine
    • 2009 October 11, Amy Zipkin, “On the Discovery Trail”, New York Times:
      Working in the antiviral chemistry division at Bristol-Myers Squibb , I was in charge of overseeing the science for the drug stavudine for H.I.V., and when we developed tenofovir disoproxil fumarate it replaced stavudine.
      add
  18. sul *
    • 2009 October 11, Stuart Emmrich, “100 Hotels Under $150”, New York Times:
      87) Le Finestre sul Vaticano Via Angelo Emo, 130 (39-347) 7563811 www.romabandb.it 90 euro
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  19. symbologist
    • 2009 October 11, Maureen Dowd, “Capital Secrets”, New York Times:
      So I happily curled up with Robert Langdon, the author’s anodyne, tweedy doppelgänger, and suppressed my annoyance that the Harvard symbologist was still wearing his Mickey Mouse watch, hand-grinding his Sumatra coffee beans and refusing to entangle with the latest brainy babe who materializes to help untangle ancient secrets.
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  20. tenofovir
    • 2009 October 11, Amy Zipkin, “On the Discovery Trail”, New York Times:
      Still, the research generated a product, tenofovir, that had greater potential against H.I.V. Adefovir dipivoxil was later approved for treatment against hepatitis B at a lower dose.
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  21. thorbjorn
    • 2009 October 11, Yoni Brenner, “Norwegian Word”, New York Times:
      And so I have invented a new word: it’s called “thorbjorn.”
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  22. thorbjorned
    • 2009 October 11, Yoni Brenner, “Norwegian Word”, New York Times:
      And so, ladies and gentlemen, I am humbled, humbled and thorbjorned to be here.
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  23. thorbjorning
    • 2009 October 11, Yoni Brenner, “Norwegian Word”, New York Times:
      But at the same time, I ask that in the future the committee might take certain steps to avert unnecessary thorbjorning.
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  24. unblooded
    • 2009 October 11, Elizabeth D. Samet, “Marine Dreams”, New York Times:
      Recalling his anxiety as an unblooded lieutenant on the eve of the Mexican War, Ulysses S. Grant confessed, “I felt sorry that I had enlisted.”
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  25. unchildish
    • 2009 October 11, Jennifer Schuessler, “Dangerous Fancies”, New York Times:
      “He doesn’t know anything about boys, or making things up”), and of Olive’s own triumphant play for unchildish adults, hailed for its echoes of Wagner and Kleist.
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  26. underreact
    • 2009 October 11, Conrad De Aenlle, “When Emotions Move the Markets”, New York Times:
      “Investors tend to underreact to positive fundamental change,” said Horacio Valeiras, chief investment officer of Nicholas-Applegate Capital Management.
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  27. uninvent
    • 2009 October 11, Roz Chast, Tucker Nichols, Jillian Tamaki, Joseph Hart, Karen Barbour, Bella Foster, Jason Polan And Seth, “My Bake Sale Memory”, New York Times:
      It’s easier to ban bake sales than to get rid of half the cars in the city, or uninvent video games, or design broccoli that tastes like homemade chocolate chip cookies.
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  28. unlaureled
    • 2009 October 11, Elizabeth D. Samet, “Marine Dreams”, New York Times:
      In the eyes of the marooned Colonel Wilhoite, who, having missed out on the war, commands the East River island prison that is the setting for “Blankenship,” can be discerned “specters of battles unseen and medals unwon and the slow final ooze of unlaureled retirement.”
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  29. wheelstanding
    • 2009 October 11, Paul Stenquist, “A Market for Cars Born to Run”, New York Times:
      But the car that outscored them all was the outrageous, wheelstanding Little Red Wagon pickup, which went for more than half a million dollars.
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Sequestered[edit]