User:Visviva/Observer 20090118

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-18 issue of The Observer which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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56145 tokens ‧ 44185 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 6858 types ‧ 34 (~ 0.496%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-01-18[edit]

  1. awayday
    • 2009 January 18, Henry Porter, “Let the war on hypocrisy begin”, The Observer:
      But this is no awayday for MPs, because in some sense the convention is a challenge to a parliament.
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  2. chuntering
  3. cripplingly
  4. crossbench
  5. darkie
  6. dysmorphia
    • 2009 January 18, Catherine Bennett, “The beauty industry is at it again ... it's not a pretty sight”, The Observer:
      Not while the Department of Health is happy to countenance British women being used as guinea pigs and customers seem reduced to a state of collective body dysmorphia so acute as to have banished common sense.
      add
  7. footbinding
    • 2009 January 18, Catherine Bennett, “The beauty industry is at it again ... it's not a pretty sight”, The Observer:
      But with the triumphant announcement that Allergan, the maker of Botox, has just received the American Food and Drug Administration's approval to flog a patent eyelash-growing lotion called Latisse™, comes the realisation that observable eyelash deficiency will soon, no less than a lined forehead on telly, or big feet in the age of footbinding, come to represent a perverse and reckless choice on the part of a woman who chooses not to eliminate this imperfection.
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  8. hardman
  9. nerdishness
  10. pathologising
    • 2009 January 18, Catherine Bennett, “The beauty industry is at it again ... it's not a pretty sight”, The Observer:
      If only a limited number of doctors aspire to cut open normal breasts or bottoms so as to insert improving bags of silicone or to extract buckets of fat, and there remain places where the temporary paralysis of facial muscles with botulinum toxin is not considered the highest medical calling, a wider professional complacency about these interventions has encouraged women to see such adjustments as worthwhile, as opposed to what they usually are: an astonishing, almost comically cynical pathologising of the healthy.
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  11. pekes
    • 2009 January 18, Catherine Bennett, “The beauty industry is at it again ... it's not a pretty sight”, The Observer:
      Could it not, following its successful assault on Crufts, now campaign against women being judged by physical standards that may be more detrimental to their welfare than anything imposed on spaniels and pekes?
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  12. revitalisation
  13. securitised
    • 2009 January 18, Will Hutton, “Unless we are decisive Britain faces bankruptcy”, The Observer:
      Nonetheless it has taken monumental US taxpayer investment, guarantees of up to $500bn toxic loans and the willingness of the Federal Reserve to buy trillions of dollars of securitised assets even to begin to stabilise matters.
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  14. slumspotting
  15. streetkids
  16. synthetics
    • 2009 January 18, Will Hutton, “Unless we are decisive Britain faces bankruptcy”, The Observer:
      On Friday credit-rating agency Moodys announced new and more demanding criteria for how "synthetics" will be valued in future - implying that bank guarantors will need to find billions extra in capital to support them.
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  17. tricksy
    • 2009 January 18, Henry Porter, “Let the war on hypocrisy begin”, The Observer:
      As co-director, I would naturally talk it up, but many have been struck by the contrast - actually, I would say lunatic hypocrisy - in a government where you have a foreign secretary who, swooning for Obama, called for Britain to champion the rule of law and "uphold our commitments to human rights and civil liberties at home" and a justice secretary who a few hours before had announced measures in the Coroners and Justice Bill (a tricksy little portmanteau if ever there was one) that will bring in secret inquests and legalise a vast exchange of personal data between government departments.
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  18. undernote
  19. unenhanced
    • 2009 January 18, Catherine Bennett, “The beauty industry is at it again ... it's not a pretty sight”, The Observer:
      Unlike vets, who tend to be on the side of dogs, and therefore against people who want to mess around with the dogs' noses, legs, ears, etc, many doctors plainly feel, like Mr Fagien, that women in their unenhanced state offer plenty of scope for improvement.
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  20. unscrutinised
    • 2009 January 18, Henry Porter, “Let the war on hypocrisy begin”, The Observer:
      Last week, I wrote a story for my blog on Comment is free that showed how statutory instruments - in other words, unscrutinised, undebated ministerial decrees - had doubled in the last 20 years, while the number of bills laid before parliament for scrutiny and debate had declined.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. luddite - may not qualify as alt. cap.
    • 2009 January 18, Robert McCrum, “Accidental barrister who wielded his wit to share life's big joke”, The Observer:
      Following his knighthood in 1998, some commentators tried to cast "Sir John" as a modern Falstaff, a "national treasure", replete with a love child, luddite sensibilities, and all the outrageous contradictions of the "champagne socialist" - his own description.
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