User:Visviva/Observer 20090125

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-01-25 issue of The Observer which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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53578 tokens ‧ 42622 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 6753 types ‧ 29 (~ 0.429%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-01-25[edit]

  1. archetypally
    • 2009 January 25, David Mitchell, “David Mitchell defends our mad monarchy”, The Observer:
      Separated from the nitty-gritty of politics and power, our monarchy can be a focus for both national pride and self-loathing, the latter being much more archetypally British than the former.
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  2. babylosers
  3. birdwatch
    • 2009 January 25, Amelia Hill, “So where have all the starlings gone?”, The Observer:
      The largest mass participation environmental survey in the world continues today with more than half a million households expected to take part in the weekend's big garden birdwatch.
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  4. bluetits
    • 2009 January 25, Amelia Hill, “So where have all the starlings gone?”, The Observer:
      "We were amazed to realise that although we have lots of bluetits and magpies we didn't have a single sparrow or starling.
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  5. glassings
    • 2009 January 25, “Observer letters”, The Observer:
      Bridgend on a Saturday night has its temporary inflatable hospitals for the stabbings and glassings."
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  6. hyperpolarisation
    • 2009 January 25, Paul Rodgers, “MRI boost gives view into lungs”, The Observer:
      The technique, called hyperpolarisation, makes the signal detected by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner so strong it reveals details that could only be seen previously by slicing the patient open.
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  7. hyperpolarise
    • 2009 January 25, Paul Rodgers, “MRI boost gives view into lungs”, The Observer:
      So Wild has concentrated on using lasers to hyperpolarise xenon or an isotope called helium-3.
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  8. lairiness
    • 2009 January 25, Kathryn Flett, “Kathryn Flett: Jonathan Ross was great. Shame about Tom Cruise”, The Observer:
      For my money, by losing the hitherto wearisome "edge" and tempering his inappropriate lairiness, Ross has allowed the format to reassert itself and ensure it becomes precisely what a chat show presented by a smart, 48-year-old man should be, which is respectful of both its audience and its guests.
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  9. pia
    • 2009 January 25, Denis Campbell, “Kian, 4, needs a miracle. He's in the right place”, The Observer:
      One screen in the theatre relays live colour pictures of Harkness and his colleague Tiernan Byrnes's progress, cutting and pushing through first the dura, then the arachnoid and finally the pia, the thin, spider's web-type membranes that cover the brain itself.
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  10. punkish
    • 2009 January 25, Tania Branigan, “China fears riots will spread as boom goes sour”, The Observer:
      Down the queue, Wei Xian is 40 years her junior; his punkish hairstyle and the two spikes through his left ear hinted at his newfound urban tastes.
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  11. scrappage
    • 2009 January 25, Gaby Hinsliff, “Cheap loans for drivers in car industry bail-out plan”, The Observer:
      Ministers have also looked at introducing so-called "scrappage" schemes, under which motorists willing to trade in older, polluting cars for greener new models would get a one-off payment.
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  12. supranuclear
  13. swamplands
    • 2009 January 25, Rajeev Syal, “Call for airport cull of Canada geese”, The Observer:
      As their name suggests, they originated in the Canadian tundra and many winter in the southern swamplands of the United States.
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  14. swoonathon
  15. synostosis
  16. unfairnesses
    • 2009 January 25, David Mitchell, “David Mitchell defends our mad monarchy”, The Observer:
      The defining unfairness is that you have to be a member of that family to be king or queen; fringe unfairnesses like their not being able to marry Catholics or men having priority in the line of succession are irrelevant in that context.
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  17. unstuffiness
  18. weatherbeaten
  19. weathermakers
    • 2009 January 25, James Robinson, “Amanda Staveley: Flying fixer of the Square Mile”, The Observer:
      Her status as one of the Square Mile's "weathermakers" has given her an enviable lifestyle, with a huge house in London's Park Lane and another in Dubai, where her neighbour is tennis star Roger Federer.
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  20. zeitgeistily
    • 2009 January 25, Kathryn Flett, “Kathryn Flett: Jonathan Ross was great. Shame about Tom Cruise”, The Observer:
      OK, fair enough, maybe some people don't think the hair and suits work, but my point is that on Friday night we saw a Jonathan Ross who has clearly grown up and put away childish things, which was not only an essential career move but, post-inauguration, also a zeitgeistily fashionable nod to Obama.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. fareweel
  2. sae