User:Visviva/Observer 20090920

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 2009-09-19 issue of The Guardian which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created.

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83671 tokens ‧ 34 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 34 types ‧ 34 (~ 100%) words before cleaning ‧ 

2009-09-19[edit]

  1. bemusingly
    • 2009 September 20, Peter Preston, “BBC-bashing with little focus on the future”, Guardian:
      And David, who bemusingly appears to want Ofcom made much "smaller" as well as much bigger to regulate the BBC, will have cuts and financial crunches to keep him very busy indeed.
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  2. centavos *
    • 2009 September 20, Kathryn Hopkins, “Philippines ponders text levy”, Guardian:
      A bill in the house of representatives is seeking a tax of five centavos ($0.001) on every message sent by a mobile phone.
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  3. chargrilled
    • 2009 September 20, Allan Jenkins, “Hope and glory”, Guardian:
      Expect heaps of chargrilled summer squash and sweetcorn among the sticky sausages.
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  4. conservatoire
    • 2009 September 20, Ed Vulliamy, “The passion that drives the ultra patriot”, Guardian:
      Born in 1953 and raised in North Ossetia, Gergiev went to his adoptive home, Leningrad, to study at the conservatoire in 1972.
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  5. doorline
    • 2009 September 20, Martin Love, “High on the hog”, Guardian:
      It has an unusually high bonnet with wide powerful shoulders, bulging wheel arches and a roofline that slopes from the windscreen down to the upward sweep of the tapering doorline.
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  6. jaikies
  7. josser
    • 2009 September 20, Kathryn Flett, “Upfront: Back to the big top”, Guardian:
      Tom and Linda were exceptionally kind to the "josser" in their midst (there's no "t" in josser, though in circus parlance it means "outsider"), not least with the tea and bacon butties, but unforgivably I haven't seen them for a while, though we keep in touch, so when I realised it was my "anniversary", I texted Linda to say I would be driving up and she might want to stick the kettle on.
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  8. komatsuna
    • 2009 September 20, Allan Jenkins, “Hope and glory”, Guardian:
      Two short rows each of a blonde chicory and spinach, one of mibuna, one komatsuna, one pak choi (these last three Orientals from Chiltern Seeds, www.chilternseeds.co.uk), plus a Simpson's salad mix (www.simpsonsseeds.co.uk).
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  9. managership
  10. mibuna
    • 2009 September 20, Allan Jenkins, “Hope and glory”, Guardian:
      Two short rows each of a blonde chicory and spinach, one of mibuna, one komatsuna, one pak choi (these last three Orientals from Chiltern Seeds, www.chilternseeds.co.uk), plus a Simpson's salad mix (www.simpsonsseeds.co.uk).
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  11. oommph
  12. permutating
    • 2009 September 20, Peter Preston, “BBC-bashing with little focus on the future”, Guardian:
      Sometimes the great names of TV give the impression of being merely the same old permutating chaps, obsessed with musical chairs and a future that won't happen until hell and Cambridge beanfeasts freeze over.
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  13. pursuiter
    • 2009 September 20, William Fotheringham, “Blood, sweat and gears in Tuscany”, Guardian:
      The toughest professional races just happen to be the best way for a pursuiter - team or individual - to gain the fitness needed to win an Olympic gold, as Giro and Tour regulars Bradley Wiggins and Geraint Thomas showed in Beijing.
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  14. quai *
  15. shinsei
  16. shopworkers
    • 2009 September 20, David Mitchell, “Heels? Well, I've worn them to work”, Guardian:
      She claims that professional dress codes oblige some women, such as shopworkers and airline staff, to wear teetering shoes.
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  17. smartish
    • 2009 September 20, “Online banking ... my loss was also my gain!”, Guardian:
      Here in Germany I once found cash in my account and my bank rang me pretty smartish to check that it was a mistake (payment for a used car) and revoked the transaction, sending it back to the payer.
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  18. summiteering
    • 2009 September 20, Heather Stewart, “In Pittsburgh leaders should spare the speeches and fix financial institutions”, Guardian:
      And that's part of the problem with the summiteering band wagon: at this point, a year after the collapse of Lehman, much of the work that needs to be done in fixing the world's financial system is complex, nitty gritty analysis and negotiation on problems such as how to tighten banks' capital ratios, reform the ratings agencies and deal with the demise of giant financial institutions.
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  19. tagetes
    • 2009 September 20, Allan Jenkins, “Hope and glory”, Guardian:
      I tie in canes to the swooning tagetes and get in a final hour's weeding.
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  20. thalassotherapy
    • 2009 September 20, Annabelle Thorpe, “Madeira spas and hotels”, Guardian:
      The newest kid on the block is the Melia Madeira Mare (meliamadeira.com ), which opened in July on the coast just west of the capital, and has a state-of-the-art Malo Clinic spa, specialising in thalassotherapy treatments.
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  21. uncosted
    • 2009 September 20, Gaby Hinsliff, “Tories' tax rise claim backfires on George Osborne”, Guardian:
      The first shot in the conference season was fired on Friday when the Liberal Democrats cited Treasury documents revealed under freedom of information laws to argue that the Tories had racked up £53bn in uncosted spending plans.
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  22. vaguenesses
  23. wranglings
    • 2009 September 20, Heather Stewart, “In Pittsburgh leaders should spare the speeches and fix financial institutions”, Guardian:
      In moments of dire economic crisis, such as the depths of the financial turmoil last autumn, a show of international solidarity can be valuable – and sometimes it can take the intervention of heads of state to cut through the tit-for-tat wranglings of national officials – Churchill's "parley at the summit", the origin of the phrase.
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  24. yachtsfolk
    • 2009 September 20, Emma John, “Why are so many teenagers sailing the world solo?”, Guardian:
      Laura Dekker, 13 The Dutch girl's parents, both round-the-world yachtsfolk, had helped her plan her two-year-voyage – but it was grounded after a Dutch court overruled them.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. amongsts - not dictionary material
    • 2009 September 20, Caroline Boucher, “Halfway to Hollywood: Diaries 1980-88 by Michael Palin”, Guardian:
      He describes himself as a "neat, anally retentive little list keeper", but actually Michael Palin is a rather good diarist (as long as he amends the "whilsts" and "amongsts" in the next collection) and to my baby-boomer generation, something of a god.
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  2. bungalowed - probable nonce word
    • 2009 September 20, Jay Rayner, “Last tango in Dorset”, Guardian:
      The hotel is slap bang in the middle of bungalowed suburbs.
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  3. jaikiedom - probable nonce word (but see jaikie)
    • 2009 September 20, Kevin McKenna, “Commonwealth Games return pride to the Clyde”, Guardian:
      It was quite evident that our four al fresco friends were establishing a self-policing regime among Clydeside jaikiedom in respect of discarded strong lager tins and fortified wine bottles on their stretch of the river.
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  4. smartsearch - a commercial website feature
    • 2009 September 20, Sam Dunn, “Pay off your credit card debts in the right order”, Guardian:
      • If you're after a separate balance transfer card but don't have a spotless credit record and worry about further damage through fruitless applications, try comparison site MoneySupermarket.com's "smartsearch" option.
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  5. whilsts - not dictionary material
    • 2009 September 20, Caroline Boucher, “Halfway to Hollywood: Diaries 1980-88 by Michael Palin”, Guardian:
      He describes himself as a "neat, anally retentive little list keeper", but actually Michael Palin is a rather good diarist (as long as he amends the "whilsts" and "amongsts" in the next collection) and to my baby-boomer generation, something of a god.
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