User:Visviva/Reader 19880115

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-01-15 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-16).

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37149 tokens ‧ 28391 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5733 types ‧ 36 (~ 0.628%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-01-15[edit]

  1. antipornography
    • 1988 January 15, Name withheld, “Movie Politics”, Chicago Reader:
      "Progressive" political movie crit, as widely practiced, spurts from the same well of American pietism as various youth purity movements, the Anti-Saloon League, school-library book-banning groups, the Moral Majority, and the radical antipornography squads.
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  2. blam
  3. bloodred
  4. bolshevism
    • 1988 January 15, Harold Henderson, “To Feed the World at Our Doorstep...”, Chicago Reader:
      "Proud as we are of the toothache achievement, we would almost rather have the children go about with poultices tied around their heads than to have the result called socialism, and if a powerful newspaper called a dental clinic bolshevism, I venture to predict that social workers could be found who would say, 'We don't really approve of dental clinics.
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  5. buttonhook
    • 1988 January 15, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Yet the Bears never set up the deep patterns with a turn-in or a buttonhook, and they never tried to simply get the ball into his hands with a quick screen--perhaps because McMahon couldn't get the required zip on the ball for these patterns, perhaps because the Bears were merely stupid.
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  6. channelers
    • 1988 January 15, C.C. Pyle, “Our Bodies, Their Selves”, Chicago Reader:
      Few channelers call themselves mediums, however, in part because the term conjures up an image of gypsy crones hunched over crystal balls, and in part because spiritualism has a history of fraud.
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  7. culty
  8. dictations
    • 1988 January 15, C.C. Pyle, “Our Bodies, Their Selves”, Chicago Reader:
      The church stresses that dictations aren't the same as channeled messages, although the distinction was beyond me.
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  9. emotionality
    • 1988 January 15, Christopher Hill, “Game Theory”, Chicago Reader:
      You might say that Game Theory is the fruition of the whole "quirky pop" school, except that they've traded that format's dinky-toy irresolution for surging emotionality, rigorous and radical musicianship, and "I Can See for Miles" dynamics.
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  10. fastgrowing
    • 1988 January 15, C.C. Pyle, “Our Bodies, Their Selves”, Chicago Reader:
      So, you want to get in on this fastgrowing opportunity for spiritual enlightenment and quick bucks?
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  11. ghettoization
  12. hijinx
    • 1988 January 15, Tom Boeker, “A Night at Dykes Who Date/Crusaders”, Chicago Reader:
      But given the funny hats and juvenile hijinx, it's hard to buy the play's more serious intentions.
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  13. iceward
    • 1988 January 15, David Allen Jones, “The Boys of Winter”, Chicago Reader:
      Billy suddenly digging his skate blades into the surface of the ice (chuk-chuk), Billy sweeping his stick back in a high arc behind him (whoosh), Billy flashing the blade of the stick back down iceward (slap), and rocketing the hard black puck against the plain pine boards staked up against the wall of Mr. H.'s house (ka-BOOM!).
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  14. lakeshore
    • 1988 January 15, Paul Botts, “Environment: Waukegan's Toxic Waits”, Chicago Reader:
      About 40 miles up the lakeshore from downtown Chicago, Waukegan became the only deep-water port between here and Milwaukee; as industry settled there, a town of fewer than 10,000 souls grew to a bustling manufacturing city of better than 50,000.
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  15. megafinance
    • 1988 January 15, C.C. Pyle, “Our Bodies, Their Selves”, Chicago Reader:
      We bandied metaphysics and megafinance for a few minutes, then Saint Germain/Stebbins launched into a 40-minute discourse on the true meaning of the crash.
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  16. misproduced
    • 1988 January 15, John Bliss, “Playing at Theater”, Chicago Reader:
      As written, Ghost Watch is a mess; as staged, it was a misproduced mess.
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  17. nonbelief
    • 1988 January 15, Name withheld, “Movie Politics”, Chicago Reader:
      But of course, heresy and nonbelief are hardly comparable crimes.
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  18. noninstitutional
  19. outcoached
    • 1988 January 15, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Last year, the Bears were outplayed and outcoached and deserved to lose.
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  20. overdeveloped
  21. sardonicism
    • 1988 January 15, Bill Wyman, “The four phases of Pink Floyd”, Chicago Reader:
      Still, The Wall, Waters's alleged autobiography, was a shockingly revealing portfolio of self-pitying woes, unfunny sardonicism, and bone-crunching metaphor (even if, like me, you thought that the central wall construct had possibilities, you're mighty sick of it by album's end).
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  22. semiautobiographical
    • 1988 January 15, Harold Henderson, “To Feed the World at Our Doorstep...”, Chicago Reader:
      From lobbying the city for better garbage pickup, Addams and her many associates moved to lobbying the state legislature (for the eight-hour day and for the vote for women, and against child labor), lecturing around the country, and writing magazine articles and books (Democracy and Social Ethics, A New Conscience and an Ancient Evil, The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets, and her semiautobiographical masterpiece Twenty Years at Hull-House).
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  23. squatly
    • 1988 January 15, Frank John Reid, “Further Facts on Flying Saucers”, Chicago Reader:
      Arnold was always hesitant about catching their exact shape as they fluttered; eight had semicircular leading edges and blunt, squatly pointed trailing edges.
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  24. surreally
    • 1988 January 15, Kathryn Hixson, “On Exhibit: a gallery full of flowers”, Chicago Reader:
      Bonnie Lucas further anthropomorphizes the flower in her watercolors, combining it surreally with the human female figure to comment ironically on the reproductive oppression of the female--human and floral.
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  25. testosteroned
    • 1988 January 15, Bill Wyman, “The four phases of Pink Floyd”, Chicago Reader:
      "Dogs of War" is about--surprise!--mercenaries, the fall-back subject of choice for every overly testosteroned rock musician since the Creation.
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  26. toxics
  27. uncondescending
    • 1988 January 15, Harold Henderson, “To Feed the World at Our Doorstep...”, Chicago Reader:
      Neighborhood residents did indeed respond to this uncondescending assumption that they, too, could be moved by the same masterpieces that stirred collegiate newcomers.
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  28. uninquiring
    • 1988 January 15, C. Arnold, “Vapid Pap”, Chicago Reader:
      Your column might be dismissed as vapid and predigested pap, catering to and titillating, I must assume, the uninquiring minds of those whose lifetime agendas include decisions of no greater import than whether to drive the BMW or the Mercedes on any given day, were it not for the fact that vast numbers of people right here in Chicago must daily live that "bigger agenda" that Vernon Jarrett not only "devotes his whole life to," but must live, as well, if you catch my drift, Michael.
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  29. unleashable
    • 1988 January 15, Bill Wyman, “The four phases of Pink Floyd”, Chicago Reader:
      Despite instances of crystalline, elemental brilliance rhythmically and instrumentally, Waters was falling into the psychological traps he'd been limning so effectively in the establishment figures he railed against: he was arrogant and unleashable; he confused his terrors, his problems, with those of the world generally; and he started forgetting the past--i.e., the teamwork that had produced the group's best music.
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Sequestered[edit]