User:Visviva/Reader 19880205

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← Previous (1988-01-29) Words harvested from the Chicago Reader, 1988-02-05
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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-02-05 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-16).

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37811 tokens ‧ 29075 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5565 types ‧ 38 (~ 0.683%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-02-05[edit]

  1. antimilitarist
    • 1988 February 5, David Moberg, “Jackson and Simon in Iowa”, Chicago Reader:
      Despite a cultural conservatism that they share with Simon's rural and small-town southern Illinois neighbors, Iowa Democrats tend to be more liberal and antimilitarist than downstate Illinois Democrats.
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  2. auteurist
    • 1988 February 5, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Process of Illumination”, Chicago Reader:
      In the case of documentaries, our thinking tends to be less warped and biased, if only because the auteurist sensibility has never been too comfortable outside of fiction.
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  3. bacchantes
    • 1988 February 5, Albert Williams, “Vinegar Tom”, Chicago Reader:
      Some scholarship has clarified the processes by which pagan gods and goddesses were distorted and transformed by the Christian patriarchy into images of evil: for example, the fertility god Dionysus, with his sacred serpents, cloven-hoofed satyr sidekicks, and cult of frenzied female bacchantes, became the witch-seducing devil of medieval Christianity, while the significant role of woman as the vessel through which Satan operates has roots in ancient man's efforts to stamp out mother-goddess worship.
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  4. bitcheries
    • 1988 February 5, Albert Williams, “Slowdance in Room 8-C/Again, Sometime Soon”, Chicago Reader:
      Again, Sometime Soon, the evening's opener, has a barbed comic style that recalls the bitcheries of The Boys in the Band, but the gay, mostly white milieu has become black and mostly heterosexual here.
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  5. buoyance
    • 1988 February 5, Tom Boeker, “They Sure Are Strange in New York”, Chicago Reader:
      Veronica Petrillo's typical virgin is ironically similar to her streetwise actor, except for a certain added buoyance.
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  6. burlesquing
    • 1988 February 5, Billie Lawless, “Laying Down the Lawless”, Chicago Reader:
      When the venerable New York Times took my quote in which I described the neon elements as "burlesquing the myth of male dominance" and instead printed "he prefers to describe them as .
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  7. buteos
    • 1988 February 5, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      In flight, it has the broad-winged, wide-tailed look of the buteos, the soaring hawks that are built like small eagles.
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  8. coowner
    • 1988 February 5, Achy Obejas, “The Press: Averting Our Gays”, Chicago Reader:
      This causes unnecessary mystery and so much confusion that when a gay man really does die of something other than AIDS, as in the case of Tom Norton, the popular coowner of Unabridged Books, festering doubt will plague his memory.
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  9. crackbrained
    • 1988 February 5, Lawrence Bommer, “The Fan Club”, Chicago Reader:
      Ralph is a downtrodden, debt-ridden mailman who lives on a diet of Jeopardy, Wheel of Fortune, and The People's Court; dreams of sudden quiz-show success; and (like his namesake, Kramden) keeps hatching crackbrained get-rich schemes (his latest is a battery-operated jump rope).
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  10. electability
    • 1988 February 5, David Moberg, “Jackson and Simon in Iowa”, Chicago Reader:
      It is present partly in people's feelings about him and about blacks in general, but it is more overtly present in the question about the rest of the country and "electability": I may not be racist, but are the rest of my fellow Americans ready to vote for a black?
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  11. extraparliamentary
    • 1988 February 5, David Moberg, “Jackson and Simon in Iowa”, Chicago Reader:
      Unlike Jackson, he has not made himself part of a political movement or exercised extraparliamentary leadership, except in his early newspapering days.
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  12. gigajillion
    • 1988 February 5, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      On the other hand, a single snow crystal contains perhaps 100 million molecules, which can be arranged in a gigajillion different ways.
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  13. hausfrau
    • 1988 February 5, Albert Williams, “Hungry Hearts”, Chicago Reader:
      JoEllen is a dumpy small-town hausfrau trying to be good and stick to her bowl of dry salad, but unable to resist the call of the chocolate cake she keeps moving around from the icebox to the cupboard to the stove.
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  14. huipil
    • 1988 February 5, Salena Fuller, “On Exhibit: modern art of the ancient Maya”, Chicago Reader:
      A woman weaves her huipil after praying to the saints, who are believed to have taught women to weave "in the beginning of time.
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  15. huipiles
    • 1988 February 5, Salena Fuller, “On Exhibit: modern art of the ancient Maya”, Chicago Reader:
      The weavers' art is represented here mostly by long rectangular blouses, gorgeously brocaded or embroidered, called huipiles.
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  16. medicare
    • 1988 February 5, David Moberg, “Jackson and Simon in Iowa”, Chicago Reader:
      "He will try to turn this country around a little bit, provide jobs, medicare for the elderly.
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  17. motivationless
  18. netless
  19. nongays
    • 1988 February 5, Achy Obejas, “The Press: Averting Our Gays”, Chicago Reader:
      The description was patently transparent: not only did it hint broadly to nongays, but it also belied the truth of Isherwood and Bachardy's off-and-on living situation.
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  20. nonhostile
    • 1988 February 5, David Moberg, “Jackson and Simon in Iowa”, Chicago Reader:
      "People are grappling with it, and they're doing it in a nonhostile atmosphere," he said.
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  21. nonphotic
    • 1988 February 5, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      BBs, "stars," and other "nonphotic" visual stimuli (i.e., those not actually produced by light) are called photopsia or phosphenes.
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  22. partiers
    • 1988 February 5, Albert Williams, “Slowdance in Room 8-C/Again, Sometime Soon”, Chicago Reader:
      The partiers include Vera's errant husband, whose other conquests happen to include Ramona; Gerald, a hammy actor who earns his living as the "token black" in mediocre midwestern rep companies; Rose-Lillian, a busty, aging ingenue waiting in vain for her young Latino lover to come for her; and Liz, a social-climbing young model who can speak French but can't sing the blues.
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  23. photopsia
    • 1988 February 5, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      BBs, "stars," and other "nonphotic" visual stimuli (i.e., those not actually produced by light) are called photopsia or phosphenes.
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  24. preachiness
    • 1988 February 5, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Process of Illumination”, Chicago Reader:
      Although Radium City clearly belongs to a tradition of investigative, muckraking journalism, the film exhibits none of the preachiness or self-righteousness that often accompanies such forays.
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  25. satanism
    • 1988 February 5, Albert Williams, “Vinegar Tom”, Chicago Reader:
      We don't burn our witches anymore, but sex and satanism still make for a good political bonfire.
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  26. snowologists
    • 1988 February 5, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      But considering the impossibly large number of flakes in a single snowfall, let alone that have ever fallen, how could snowologists have possibly taken a sample large enough to conclude that no two are alike?
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  27. subminimum
    • 1988 February 5, David Moberg, “Jackson and Simon in Iowa”, Chicago Reader:
      Over the years Simon has voted for some conservative clinkers--for example, the balanced budget amendment, the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings automatic budget slashing legislation, the Hyde amendment to ban abortion funds, and a subminimum wage for teenagers.
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  28. unfeathered
    • 1988 February 5, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      On most birds, the tarsus is scaly and unfeathered, but a few arctic species--snowy owls, ptarmigans, and rough-legged hawks among them--have feathered tarsi.
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  29. unindentured
    • 1988 February 5, Lawrence Bommer, “Miss Lulu Bett”, Chicago Reader:
      She sets her breakaway in a claustrophobic midwestern burg (circa 1920) where for 15 years Miss Lulu Bett, a stereotypical spinster and poor relation, has been slaving in her married sister's home as an unindentured cook and housemaid.
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  30. untelegenic
    • 1988 February 5, David Moberg, “Jackson and Simon in Iowa”, Chicago Reader:
      Then, finished with this last in a series of fly-around press conferences, his untelegenic features reddened from the cold, Simon quipped as he strolled to the car: "It's kind of nice and pleasant out here.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. ssswwiiisshh
    • 1988 February 5, John Conroy, “Getting the Picture”, Chicago Reader:
      When a club would come down on a head, it would be like a ssswwiiisshh, and then the club would come up, and then--it's just like the sea parting--the guy's head would just split open and all of a sudden just gush up the blood.
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