User:Visviva/Reader 19880212

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-02-12 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-16).

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34852 tokens ‧ 26322 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5494 types ‧ 28 (~ 0.51%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-02-12[edit]

  1. antiheroine
    • 1988 February 12, Lawrence Bommer, “Extremeties/Talking With . . .”, Chicago Reader:
      Mastrosimone's (antiheroine?) Marjorie lets in a man who quickly drops the small talk, slams her to the floor, and almost smothers her with a pillow as he commands her to say "thank you," "I love you," and "I am your puta.
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  2. belles
    • 1988 February 12, Anthony Adler, “Send in the Hicks”, Chicago Reader:
      Cloud's The Stick Wife, after all, isn't a sentimental comedy about the foibles and felonies of some whacked-out southern belles.
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  3. biculturalism
    • 1988 February 12, J. Higgs-Peres, “Three Teachers Slurring”, Chicago Reader:
      I was schooled in a northwest suburb, where teachers aren't obsessed with striking and entertaining the populace with the tired old hit "The Days of Whine and Rows," and my Spanish and biculturalism were never an issue.
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  4. comminutor
    • 1988 February 12, Harold Henderson, “A Better Glass of Water”, Chicago Reader:
      First, underground pipes carry used water away from the hotels and offices and into a king-size garbage grinder (comminutor), two parallel screws whose threads are knife blades big enough and strong enough to mince any solids into tiny pieces.
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  5. cranelike
    • 1988 February 12, Cerinda Survant, “Simple Magic”, Chicago Reader:
      Gradually certain movements acquire particular resonance in repetition: a cranelike posture, thighs together with one foot lifted clear of the floor; a side-to-side weight shift ending with the torso tipped forward and straight arms reaching forward, out, and down; a spin with arms held horizontally; a solo for Sullivan that's all fast feet, jumps, and falls.
      add
  6. demises
  7. dinnit
  8. grandpaw
    • 1988 February 12, Chris Morris, “Reading: Lester Bangs Played Typewriter”, Chicago Reader:
      (Bangs invented the term "punk rock" to describe such primordial bashers, more than half a decade before it became a rallying banner for late-70s rock primitives.) Bangs tells the story as an aged grandpaw, relating rock's prehistory to his rambunctious grandkids.
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  9. grapplings
    • 1988 February 12, Chris Morris, “Reading: Lester Bangs Played Typewriter”, Chicago Reader:
      In Reed, former leader of the Velvet Underground and great/hideous proto-punk standard-bearer of 70s rock, Bangs saw everything in himself that was wondrous and appalling; his grapplings with Reed's legend and with the artist himself (particularly in the vituperative and pathetic interview piece "Let Us Now Praise Famous Death Dwarves, or, How I Slugged It Out With Lou Reed and Stayed Awake") are psychodramas in which Bangs veers from awe to hatred to self-loathing.
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  10. kiboshed
    • 1988 February 12, Harold Henderson, “A Better Glass of Water”, Chicago Reader:
      (Again, such an ethanol plant was part of another unimplemented Sheaffer plan, worked out with the Center for Neighborhood Technology some years back but kiboshed by a crash in world ethanol prices.
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  11. midconversation
    • 1988 February 12, Jack Hayes, “Somebody Else's Name”, Chicago Reader:
      It's hard to say whether the name confusion has also prompted his wife to be so ill-tempered and suspicious that she makes her husband hang up on a writer in midconversation.
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  12. newsier
  13. presentationally
    • 1988 February 12, Albert Williams, “In Trousers”, Chicago Reader:
      Though the Alliance Theatre, which is giving the work its Chicago debut, describes In Trousers as a musical, it's really more of a song cycle or a cantata; the solos, duets, trios, and quartets are delivered to the audience presentationally, and there is no dialogue.
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  14. puta
    • 1988 February 12, Lawrence Bommer, “Extremeties/Talking With . . .”, Chicago Reader:
      Mastrosimone's (antiheroine?) Marjorie lets in a man who quickly drops the small talk, slams her to the floor, and almost smothers her with a pillow as he commands her to say "thank you," "I love you," and "I am your puta.
      add
  15. recircle
    • 1988 February 12, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Unwarranted Heaviness”, Chicago Reader:
      Structured in some ways like a Kurt Vonnegut novel, it is mainly composed of short chapters and short paragraphs that circle and recircle the plot rather than burrow through it in strict linear fashion.
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  16. schooler
  17. semibearable
    • 1988 February 12, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Unwarranted Heaviness”, Chicago Reader:
      The semibearable heaviness of Philip Kaufman, at least in his last three features--Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Wanderers, and The Right Stuff--is largely a matter of an only half-disguised didactic impulse, a notion that he's got something to teach us.
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  18. semigratuitous
    • 1988 February 12, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Unwarranted Heaviness”, Chicago Reader:
      Making Sabina and Franz more marginal--in effect, characters who matter only in relation to Tomas and Tereza--the film never knows quite what to do with them; Franz, in particular, seems stranded in a semigratuitous Gig Young part, and the movie drops him like a hot potato the first chance that it gets.
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  19. ultrapersonal
    • 1988 February 12, Chris Morris, “Reading: Lester Bangs Played Typewriter”, Chicago Reader:
      This ultrapersonal approach is best seen in Bangs's many pieces about his idol and nemesis Lou Reed, which are collected in Psychotic Reactions under the wisely chosen chapter title "Slaying the Father.
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  20. unimplemented
    • 1988 February 12, Harold Henderson, “A Better Glass of Water”, Chicago Reader:
      (Again, such an ethanol plant was part of another unimplemented Sheaffer plan, worked out with the Center for Neighborhood Technology some years back but kiboshed by a crash in world ethanol prices.
      add
  21. unparaphrasable
    • 1988 February 12, Cerinda Survant, “Simple Magic”, Chicago Reader:
      Movement like this suggests images and meanings, yet refuses to dictate--it is movement with unspecified or unparaphrasable content, but content nonetheless--an approach more characteristic of European expressionism in the tradition of Hanya Holm, Kurt Joss, Pina Bausch, and others, who deny their works have but one meaning.
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  22. unsalvageable
    • 1988 February 12, Harold Henderson, “A Better Glass of Water”, Chicago Reader:
      Thus the city can charge developers a substantial fee for the right to dump unsalvageable bricks and mortar on the industrial-park-to-be, beat the out-of-town disposal price, and still make money.
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  23. waveringly
    • 1988 February 12, Josh Karlen, “Home Is Where the Heat Is”, Chicago Reader:
      Laughter goes up from one of the tables, and a mustached man sings loudly, waveringly, laughing:
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  24. womanchild
    • 1988 February 12, Anthony Adler, “Send in the Hicks”, Chicago Reader:
      Where the Henley heroine comes across as an awkward, desperate, emotionally battered womanchild, the knockoff's simply dumb, needy, and infantile.
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Sequestered[edit]