User:Visviva/Reader 19880311

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-03-11 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-16).

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46619 tokens ‧ 35795 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5706 types ‧ 48 (~ 0.841%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-03-11[edit]

  1. antiliberal
    • 1988 March 11, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Paranoid Illusions”, Chicago Reader:
      Prior to this, after building up a great deal of sympathy for the father of Harvey's girlfriend--a courageous and principled liberal senator, played with a lot of charisma and poise by John McGiver--the film treats his cold-blooded murder as a kind of bad-taste, antiliberal joke: the bullet that kills him passes first through a milk carton in his hand, and before he drops dead, milk gushes out.
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  2. antilights
    • 1988 March 11, Dave Rosello, “On Queue”, Chicago Reader:
      "We want to be ready if the antilights people decide to do something stupid.
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  3. antimachine
    • 1988 March 11, Gary Rivlin, “Seven Days as Mayor”, Chicago Reader:
      Marty Oberman has always been more their kind of antimachine politician; he can blast and denounce with the best of them (he can also sniff out a media opportunity with the best of them).
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  4. antimachinist
    • 1988 March 11, Gary Rivlin, “Seven Days as Mayor”, Chicago Reader:
      ) Perhaps this distraction was perversely comforting for a dyed-in-the-wool antimachinist like Orr, a sense of continuity at a time of great emotional confusion.
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  5. auteurist
    • 1988 March 11, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Paranoid Illusions”, Chicago Reader:
      Ironically, while it is as "advanced" for its period as many of the films of the French New Wave--and qualifies as a kissing cousin of that movement, much as Michael Powell's 1960 Peeping Tom did in England--it appears that the French critics missed the boat on this one entirely, perhaps in part because it couldn't be adequately accounted for in auteurist terms as "un film de John Frankenheimer.
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  6. battements
    • 1988 March 11, Dorothy Samachson, “Chicago Repertory Dance Ensemble”, Chicago Reader:
      Ernst and Watson are superb dancers--extraordinarily agile and acrobatic, and their unison spins, battements, and body lines showed a split-second timing.
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  7. buzzy
  8. centerspread
    • 1988 March 11, Dave Rosello, “On Queue”, Chicago Reader:
      The cover promised a Don Zimmer centerspread.
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  9. conjurings
    • 1988 March 11, Anthony Adler, “Nervous Chatter”, Chicago Reader:
      In between conjurings, Jan and Anka swap cures for insomnia, bicker over the baby question, recount the attack of the hissing pigeon, and construct paranoid theories about that elite 10 percent of New Yorkers who actually sleep at night.
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  10. coproduced
    • 1988 March 11, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Paranoid Illusions”, Chicago Reader:
      But the remarkable achievement of Axelrod and Frankenheimer--who coproduced the movie, and seem to have worked with an unusual amount of freedom--is to use the characters and politics to set certain narrative mechanisms in motion, and to make us accept them as if they were both coherent and believable.
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  11. doodly
    • 1988 March 11, John Holden, “Democracy with a small d: a plethora of referenda”, Chicago Reader:
      "Personally, I don't think these general referendum questions will do doodly to increase voter turnout," said Chicago Board of Election Commissioners spokesman Tom Leach.
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  12. firable
  13. handgrips
    • 1988 March 11, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      There are also "secret" signs and handgrips, which initiates are never supposed to reveal lest they suffer a fate worse than death.
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  14. horning
    • 1988 March 11, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      These men, called "accepted" masons, enjoyed the ritual and secrecy that in the Middle Ages had been necessary to transmit the skills of the craft and prevent outsiders from horning in.
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  15. illusively
    • 1988 March 11, Dorothy Samachson, “Chicago Repertory Dance Ensemble”, Chicago Reader:
      The stage was littered with rows of bottles of varying sizes, which the performers tossed back and forth or skipped in and out of with an illusively carefree charm, since the piece required considerable control and balance.
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  16. jacketless
    • 1988 March 11, Dave Rosello, “On Queue”, Chicago Reader:
      Ronnie Wickers, jacketless, dropped into Sauer's lawn chair and covered himself, face and all, with the sleeping bag.
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  17. loverless
    • 1988 March 11, Albert Williams, “Last Summer at Bluefish Cove”, Chicago Reader:
      That sounds like such a simple thing; but consider that the two most influential dramas about lesbians in 20th-century theater are Lillian Hellman's outrageously homophobic The Children's Hour (in which the closeted lesbian heroine commits suicide out of guilt for feeling an "unnatural" attraction to her straight best friend) and Frank Marcus's The Killing of Sister George (in which the defiant dyke heroine is left jobless and loverless because she refuses to act discreetly in "normal" society), and you'll see just how ambitious Chambers's intention was.
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  18. minicontroversies
    • 1988 March 11, Gary Rivlin, “Seven Days as Mayor”, Chicago Reader:
      Generally, he believes this article focuses mainly on the negatives and on the minicontroversies we talked about, leaving the false impression that he was an embattled acting mayor, constantly under siege.
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  19. misimpression
  20. mythmaking
    • 1988 March 11, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Paranoid Illusions”, Chicago Reader:
      And, as a significant side benefit, they expose the deceptive mechanisms of political and Hollywood mythmaking in general.
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  21. nabes
    • 1988 March 11, Harold Henderson, “City File”, Chicago Reader:
      To be blunt, the concern is that thousands of besotted young yahoos from the outer nabes and burbs will pour out of the ballpark at ten p.m. looking for action.
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  22. nondebatable
  23. nonmasons
    • 1988 March 11, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      As construction of Gothic cathedrals ceased and the number of real (or "operative") masons began to dwindle, some of the guilds began to accept nonmasons, often members of the upper classes.
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  24. overcorrect
    • 1988 March 11, Albert Williams, “Last Summer at Bluefish Cove”, Chicago Reader:
      The one character who advocates feminist thinking--Kitty Cochrane, the author of The Female Sexual Imperative, whose ideology has prompted Eva to leave her husband, paving the way for her accidental arrival at Bluefish Cove--is treated satirically, as a hypocrite (a homosexual preaching to straight women about sex, a lesbian afraid to come out of the closet because it might hurt her writing career) and a politically overcorrect ideologue.
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  25. pffft
    • 1988 March 11, Hugh Boulware, “Stage Effects”, Chicago Reader:
      Then we say, 'Sit forward and grimace,' and you sort of blow your mouth out like so"--Binns-Calvey puffed out his cheeks and exhaled, making a "pffft" sound.
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  26. poutily
    • 1988 March 11, Justin Hayford, “Private Visions”, Chicago Reader:
      For example, Between Lives (a solo in which Self was dressed as a 19th-century schoolboy) proved to be the most successful dance of the evening, as Self coyly, poutily paraded around the stage to the strains of Mozart.
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  27. presidentially
    • 1988 March 11, S.L. Wisenberg, “Why Are We in Honduras?”, Chicago Reader:
      That same year, a presidentially appointed commission studied the volunteer armed forces.
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  28. pseudolecture
    • 1988 March 11, Justin Hayford, “Slices of Life”, Chicago Reader:
      Open Sore Series, #2 began with a pseudolecture on Marcel Duchamp and his theory of ready-made art: the artist merely chooses an object, Jones says with his tongue in his cheek, that is "aesthetically interesting, full of provocative and evocative meaning, dense and multilayered, like all art, and above all, subtle.
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  29. readymade
    • 1988 March 11, Justin Hayford, “Slices of Life”, Chicago Reader:
      Calling something a "kinetic, audience-participatory readymade" gives it authority, regardless of the object's absurdity.
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  30. reverify
    • 1988 March 11, Gary Rivlin, “Seven Days as Mayor”, Chicago Reader:
      As I remember it, it was a series of meaningless motions: to reverify votes that didn't need verifying in the first place--
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  31. saxist
    • 1988 March 11, Neil Tesser, “Dave Liebman”, Chicago Reader:
      In Chicago, he'll jam with locals both familiar and new to him; the familiar include bassist Kelly Sill, drummer Joel Spencer, and saxist Brad Wheeler, while the new face belongs to pianist Jim Trompeter, who regularly plays keyboards with (of all people) the Miami Sound Machine.
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  32. semisilly
    • 1988 March 11, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      I have always assumed they were one of those semisilly men's associations like the Elks or the Odd Fellows, but occasionally you hear rumors of something more sinister.
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  33. spectatorship
    • 1988 March 11, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Paranoid Illusions”, Chicago Reader:
      Once again, spectacle and spectator become confused, although here spectatorship becomes anything but passive--the anger and aggression displayed on both sides gives the scene the temperature of a near-riot.
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  34. ultrafunky
    • 1988 March 11, Justin Hayford, “Private Visions”, Chicago Reader:
      Technically the film was masterful, with Moore's ultrafunky set, Man Parrish's ultrahip score, and Self's ultraquirky bee choreography.
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  35. ultrahip
    • 1988 March 11, Justin Hayford, “Private Visions”, Chicago Reader:
      Technically the film was masterful, with Moore's ultrafunky set, Man Parrish's ultrahip score, and Self's ultraquirky bee choreography.
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  36. ultraquirky
    • 1988 March 11, Justin Hayford, “Private Visions”, Chicago Reader:
      Technically the film was masterful, with Moore's ultrafunky set, Man Parrish's ultrahip score, and Self's ultraquirky bee choreography.
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  37. uncomical
    • 1988 March 11, Dorothy Samachson, “Chicago Repertory Dance Ensemble”, Chicago Reader:
      Ward may have thought she was offering a large-scale choreographic tribute to Irish culture and lore, but there was too much to absorb in this much-too-long single dance, which included three Irish drunks whose characterization was not only uncomical but offensive.
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  38. unmaterialistic
    • 1988 March 11, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Paranoid Illusions”, Chicago Reader:
      (I'm not only thinking of Dreyer: the last times I saw new prints of The Shop Around the Corner and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes were in Paris, too.) Perhaps Mary McCarthy was onto something when she noted that "the only really materialistic people I have ever met have been Europeans," and that "the strongest argument for the unmaterialistic character of American life is the fact that we tolerate conditions that are, from a materialistic point of view, intolerable.
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Sequestered[edit]