User:Visviva/Reader 19880325

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-03-25 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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43502 tokens ‧ 33540 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5961 types ‧ 48 (~ 0.805%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-03-25[edit]

  1. adzuki
    • 1988 March 25, Stephanie Ross, “Restaurant Tours: a lofty approach to health food”, Chicago Reader:
      Gourmet pizza ($6.50) is regularly featured, and from time to time a tart made from adzuki beans with vegetables and fruit ($4.50) appears among the appetizers.
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  2. antimachine
    • 1988 March 25, Florence Hamlish Levinsohn, “Where Vernon Jarrett Is Coming From”, Chicago Reader:
      His antimachine politicking helped get him fired from the Chicago Defender, a frequent supporter of organization candidates.
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  3. antisexist
    • 1988 March 25, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Our City, Ourselves”, Chicago Reader:
      Baby-laden baby boomers are instructed where they can buy antisexist children's books.
      add
  4. apocalypticism
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      In the first set are (1) apocalypticism (the world is going to end very soon), (2) polemic against mainline religious organizations and their teachings (they are corrupt and leading people to destruction), (3) proselytization (outsiders must be won through hard-sell drives for conversion), and (4) total commitment (including one's mind and savings account).
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  5. bicoastally
    • 1988 March 25, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      The literary scene is often defined bicoastally, with the emphasis on the east.
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  6. chevre
    • 1988 March 25, Stephanie Ross, “Restaurant Tours: a lofty approach to health food”, Chicago Reader:
      Other entrees offered periodically include a tart of leeks and chevre, or leeks and gruyere ($8.75); hazelnut zucchini terrine ($8.75); bluefish en papillote ($12.75), and eggplant stuffed with vegetables, nuts, and cheese, served with basil rice ($10.75).
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  7. codirector
    • 1988 March 25, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “The Greatest Living Soviet Filmmaker”, Chicago Reader:
      (Apparently because he is less fluent in Georgian than he is in Ukrainian, Armenian, and Russian, Paradjanov used one of his lead actors here, Dodo Abashidze, as a codirector because he could communicate better with the other Georgian actors.) One of the major characters, Osman-Agha, whose recounted life story forms a lengthy digression dropped into the middle of the plot, is a Georgian forced to renounce Christianity as a young man and become a Muslim, and in many respects the film's plot as a whole deals with an encounter between East and West that makes the eventual construction of the fortress--finally effected by a human sacrifice--possible.
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  8. coeditor
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      He used some of his wealth to support the group's newspaper and became the paper's coeditor.
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  9. cultlike
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      The cultlike nature of the Witnesses' teachings and disciplinary tactics made doubting difficult.
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  10. disfellowship
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      Having convinced their members that life outside the faith will lead to sin, ignominy, and violent death at the hands of Jehovah himself, Jehovah's Witnesses threaten constantly to kick out, or disfellowship, members who do not toe the line.
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  11. disfellowshiped
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      Once a member has been disfellowshiped, as Bennett was, other Witnesses, including family, are required to shun him.
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  12. egoless
  13. fettucine
  14. firebombings
    • 1988 March 25, Albert Williams, “Waiting For The Parade”, Chicago Reader:
      And we're used to books, plays, and especially movies that view the war through the British experience--the plucky little nation standing firm under the German firebombings is by now as familiar to us as our own country.
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  15. folklores
    • 1988 March 25, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “The Greatest Living Soviet Filmmaker”, Chicago Reader:
      So it shouldn't be surprising that such supposedly esoteric figures, steeped in the intricate folklores of their respective cultures--Faulkner's Mississippi, and Paradjanov's Ukraine, Georgia, and Armenia--are often appreciated first in countries other than their own.
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  16. gruyere
    • 1988 March 25, Stephanie Ross, “Restaurant Tours: a lofty approach to health food”, Chicago Reader:
      Other entrees offered periodically include a tart of leeks and chevre, or leeks and gruyere ($8.75); hazelnut zucchini terrine ($8.75); bluefish en papillote ($12.75), and eggplant stuffed with vegetables, nuts, and cheese, served with basil rice ($10.75).
      add
  17. hieratically
    • 1988 March 25, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “The Greatest Living Soviet Filmmaker”, Chicago Reader:
      The Color of Pomegranates is shot almost exclusively in frontal, hieratically posed tableaux that assume the shallow space of primitive cinema.
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  18. homosexless
    • 1988 March 25, Tom Valeo, “The Common Pursuit”, Chicago Reader:
      "For that nappy full of homosexless verse he dropped last year.
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  19. malaprop
    • 1988 March 25, Albert Williams, “A Couple of Blaguards”, Chicago Reader:
      Malachy, the portly, white-haired younger brother, still does his impersonations of ridiculous authority figures--the fire-and-brimstone priest, the stern schoolmaster, the blustering, malaprop mayor ("Half of the lies they tell about me are not true!
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  20. micks
    • 1988 March 25, Albert Williams, “A Couple of Blaguards”, Chicago Reader:
      In the intimate confines of CrossCurrents, Blaguards came across as a spontaneous Irish gabfest by two slightly inebriated brothers--indeed, the Irish woman I took to the show dubbed it "a coupla tight micks sittin' around talkin'.
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  21. mythification
    • 1988 March 25, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “The Greatest Living Soviet Filmmaker”, Chicago Reader:
      William Faulkner, perhaps the supreme American example, may easily have been the most formally inventive novelist this country has ever produced, but he never has attracted even a fraction of the adulation and mythification assigned here to Hemingway and Fitzgerald.
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  22. neotraditionalist
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      The apocalyptic theology of the Jehovah's Witnesses is not as popular today as other fundamentalist beliefs, but their founding and history are typical of other neotraditionalist sects.
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  23. nonnarrative
    • 1988 March 25, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “The Greatest Living Soviet Filmmaker”, Chicago Reader:
      While all these tableaux appear to have a literal or allegorical relationship to the life and work of Aruthin Sayadin, popularly known as Sayat Nova (the "King of Song"), and are arranged chronologically, the film veers closer to nonnarrative than it does to the continuity and development of a conventional biopic.
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  24. nonnatives
    • 1988 March 25, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Our City, Ourselves”, Chicago Reader:
      If you're a Chicagoan, you will find something in each that you didn't know about; nonnatives will find something in each they'll wish they'd read before making their last trip.
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  25. nonrational
    • 1988 March 25, Justin Hayford, “Beyond Reason”, Chicago Reader:
      Their dances center around images of birth and the preconscious, suspended in a refreshingly nonrational space.
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  26. precredits
    • 1988 March 25, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “The Greatest Living Soviet Filmmaker”, Chicago Reader:
      In the precredits sequence of Shadows, we witness the sacrificial death of the hero's brother Olexa in a snow-covered forest.
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  27. presidentials
    • 1988 March 25, Achy Obejas, “Getting Out the Vote”, Chicago Reader:
      Santiago and his boys, they didn't even deal with the presidentials here, they just went after Migdalia.
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  28. proselytization
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      In the first set are (1) apocalypticism (the world is going to end very soon), (2) polemic against mainline religious organizations and their teachings (they are corrupt and leading people to destruction), (3) proselytization (outsiders must be won through hard-sell drives for conversion), and (4) total commitment (including one's mind and savings account).
      add
  29. pseudoreligion
    • 1988 March 25, Dan Liberty, “Saying NO to Fundamentalism”, Chicago Reader:
      "San Francisco was a religion," she said, and much of her life since was spent chasing one pseudoreligion after another.
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  30. regentrification
  31. rehabber
    • 1988 March 25, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Our City, Ourselves”, Chicago Reader:
      Tem Horwitz, who authored the first Sweet Home, is today a busy loft rehabber.
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  32. resee
    • 1988 March 25, Justin Hayford, “Beyond Reason”, Chicago Reader:
      Companies like Momix help me to resee, rethink, and finally recognize the world, imbuing it with a kind of beauty and, yes, sacredness all too often absent.
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  33. resegregated
    • 1988 March 25, Florence Hamlish Levinsohn, “Where Vernon Jarrett Is Coming From”, Chicago Reader:
      At Cape May, they staged a hunger strike when the mess hall was resegregated after a brawl.
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  34. rousingly
    • 1988 March 25, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Our City, Ourselves”, Chicago Reader:
      Mark, for instance, praises Chicago most effusively for what it is not, concluding rousingly that it is withal a better place than Cincinnati.
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  35. songcraft
    • 1988 March 25, Renaldo Migaldi, “Indigos”, Chicago Reader:
      They practice a sturdy songcraft hat seems at once both naive and wise and doesn't call attention to its own cleverness.
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  36. toading
    • 1988 March 25, Harold Henderson, “City File”, Chicago Reader:
      You can now leave home with a cheery, "Bye, I'm going toading!
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  37. ungirlish
    • 1988 March 25, Lawrence Bommer, “The Magic Barrel And Other Stories”, Chicago Reader:
      Moving from an ungirlish giggle to synthetic tears, marvelous Marge Kotlisky plays this merry widow spider with a delicious indulgence worthy of Bessie's melodramatic self-pity, plus a cunning smile and a middle-aged ogle to die for.
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  38. updatings
    • 1988 March 25, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Our City, Ourselves”, Chicago Reader:
      Each is the third edition of a deservedly popular guide, updated to reflect the updatings that Chicago itself has undergone in the last few years.
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  39. veloute
  40. wherefores
    • 1988 March 25, Tom Boeker, “Nightlight”, Chicago Reader:
      So, without any knowledge of the whys and wherefores of these characters' suffering, their suffering has no meaning, and an audience is hard-pressed to pity them.
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Sequestered[edit]