User:Visviva/Reader 19880422

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-04-22 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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42255 tokens ‧ 31773 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5825 types ‧ 35 (~ 0.601%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-04-22[edit]

  1. antigravitational
    • 1988 April 22, Tom Valeo, “Not For Real”, Chicago Reader:
      He delivers a sales pitch for an "antigravitational reinforcement device with remote control.
      add
  2. barres
    • 1988 April 22, Laura Molzahn, “Losing Control”, Chicago Reader:
      The barres and the precise, controlled way in which the dancers performed their "exercises" all recalled the discipline ballet requires--but the moves themselves couldn't be more different.
      add
  3. barretted
    • 1988 April 22, Steve Bogira, “A Fire in the Family”, Chicago Reader:
      There wasn't an empty chair among the 130, and many laps were filled with youngsters, the girls with their hair all French-braided and barretted.
      add
  4. bohemia
    • 1988 April 22, Albert Williams, “Feiffer's America”, Chicago Reader:
      With actor Fredric Stone, who has the wry warmth of a young Judd Hirsch, standing in as Feiffer, the play--not a revue, but almost a pageant--recounts Feiffer's upbringing as a Depression-era Jew ("The secret of the 'melting pot' was to melt into a goyish prince"); his infatuation with movies in Hollywood's golden age (a motif often used in the cartoons); his early manhood in the military, back in the days when America was always right and wars were always winnable; his first forays into the bohemia of mid-1950s Greenwich Village; and his underpaid beginnings as a Village Voice cartoonist (from which base he has expanded into national syndication, in addition to writing books, plays, and movies).
      add
  5. broadbrimmed
    • 1988 April 22, Laura Molzahn, “Losing Control”, Chicago Reader:
      With their heads outlined by broadbrimmed hats, most of these taut young men resembled so many animate pencils; Gary DeLoatch, looking a little like a black Gene Kelly, showed the advantages of a looser, softer body with a little more play.
      add
  6. challengingly
    • 1988 April 22, Neil Tesser, “Bill Frisell, Ikue Mori, Jim Staley”, Chicago Reader:
      Frisell plays guitar and electronics, Mori is a drummer and composer, and Staley, who conceived the project, stretches the trombone into challengingly fluid sonic continua.
      add
  7. clunkiness
    • 1988 April 22, Anthony Adler, “Ourselves Alone”, Chicago Reader:
      These difficulties, plus a basic structural clunkiness in Devlin's writing--awkward expository speeches, self-conscious poetry, and badly shaped scenes--sink Ourselves Alone.
      add
  8. doomful
    • 1988 April 22, Marion Karczmar, “Tina and Rosie Don't Live Here Anymore”, Chicago Reader:
      Then the ritual began: the tearing apart with crowbar, pickax, and saw; the parade of Dumpsters filling up again and again with piles of rotting lumber; the scavengers in their doomful trucks hauling out refrigerators, stoves, water heaters, and furnaces whose backsides displayed years of collected dust hanging in matted gobs.
      add
  9. glassless
    • 1988 April 22, Steve Bogira, “A Fire in the Family”, Chicago Reader:
      The fire had transformed this building into one more image of death and decay in a neighborhood in which such images abound: the rambling, littered vacant lots--on some blocks, the few remaining buildings look like the surviving teeth in grandpa's mouth; the auto junkyard a block west down Flournoy, with its array of rusty axles, mangled bumpers, and dented body clips stacked upside down; the mounds of tires discarded by truckers near the viaducts on Flournoy, Lexington, and Polk--dusted by a winter's snow, they resemble a heap of glazed doughnuts; the hulking, five-story former mattress factory on Polk, with its big, dark, unboarded, jagged-paned and glassless windows glowering down on the neighborhood; the old men nudging down the street their grocery store shopping carts glistening with crushed aluminum; the mangy stray dogs; the No Help Wanted notice taped behind the caged window of the small steel-parts factory on Flournoy; the graffito on the overhead door of the former warehouse on Lexington: "I Have a Big Dick--Will Kill.
      add
  10. goyish
    • 1988 April 22, Albert Williams, “Feiffer's America”, Chicago Reader:
      With actor Fredric Stone, who has the wry warmth of a young Judd Hirsch, standing in as Feiffer, the play--not a revue, but almost a pageant--recounts Feiffer's upbringing as a Depression-era Jew ("The secret of the 'melting pot' was to melt into a goyish prince"); his infatuation with movies in Hollywood's golden age (a motif often used in the cartoons); his early manhood in the military, back in the days when America was always right and wars were always winnable; his first forays into the bohemia of mid-1950s Greenwich Village; and his underpaid beginnings as a Village Voice cartoonist (from which base he has expanded into national syndication, in addition to writing books, plays, and movies).
      add
  11. gutturally
    • 1988 April 22, Neil Tesser, “Bill Frisell, Ikue Mori, Jim Staley”, Chicago Reader:
      And you still can't imagine the results without blurring and often removing the lines between composition and improvisation, between acoustic and electronic sound, and between the percussive counterpoint posed by Staley's trombone to the weird lyricism Frisell manages to achieve with gutturally synthesized blocks of sound.
      add
  12. mittenlike
    • 1988 April 22, Steve Bogira, “A Fire in the Family”, Chicago Reader:
      But the doctors had to amputate the top bone of the two bones in each thumb and the top two of the three bones in each of the other eight fingers, leaving her with mittenlike hands.
      add
  13. oneliners
    • 1988 April 22, Tom Valeo, “The Ties That Hide”, Chicago Reader:
      The grandmother, as played by Lomnicki, puffing on cigarettes and delivering oneliners, radiates a personality so strong it seems to permeate both her daughter Rose and her granddaughter Rachel.
      add
  14. peekers
    • 1988 April 22, Marion Karczmar, “Tina and Rosie Don't Live Here Anymore”, Chicago Reader:
      Their wailing Dixieland came swinging out into the night, drawing the peekers outside from behind their shaded windows.
      add
  15. punnily
    • 1988 April 22, Kyle Gann, “Music Notes: Neil Rolnick's checkered career”, Chicago Reader:
      Then there's the punnily titled A Robert Johnson Sampler, which samples a record by the great blues player to make an everchanging forest of blues riffs.
      add
  16. radiothon
    • 1988 April 22, Dennis Polkow, “Chicago Symphony Orchestra--From the Archives, Volume III”, Chicago Reader:
      There is only one way to own this unique collection--by pledging the CSO $35 (for the double album) or $50 (for the double compact disc) during this weekend's radiothon, which lasts from noon Friday to midnight Sunday.
      add
  17. rehabbers
    • 1988 April 22, Marion Karczmar, “Tina and Rosie Don't Live Here Anymore”, Chicago Reader:
      A few straggled from around the corner, where wobbly cottages had not yet attracted the attention of rehabbers.
      add
  18. revues
    • 1988 April 22, Albert Williams, “Feiffer's America”, Chicago Reader:
      The blackout-sketch style of Feiffer's cartoon strips has led many theater groups on the high school, college, community, and professional levels to fashion Feiffer revues (the first major one, apparently, was done here, when Paul Sills adapted Feiffer's book of cartoons The Explainers for a 1961 production at the old Second City).
      add
  19. somethin
    • 1988 April 22, Steve Bogira, “A Fire in the Family”, Chicago Reader:
      If you know how to do somethin, you wan' go 'head and do it.'"
      add
  20. stealthiest
    • 1988 April 22, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      Herons hunt by stealth, and the bittern may be the stealthiest of the lot.
      add
  21. streamside
    • 1988 April 22, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      But once upon a time, bitterns nested in every pothole marsh and every streamside cattail patch from British Columbia to Newfoundland and from Florida to California.
      add
  22. unboarded
    • 1988 April 22, Steve Bogira, “A Fire in the Family”, Chicago Reader:
      The fire had transformed this building into one more image of death and decay in a neighborhood in which such images abound: the rambling, littered vacant lots--on some blocks, the few remaining buildings look like the surviving teeth in grandpa's mouth; the auto junkyard a block west down Flournoy, with its array of rusty axles, mangled bumpers, and dented body clips stacked upside down; the mounds of tires discarded by truckers near the viaducts on Flournoy, Lexington, and Polk--dusted by a winter's snow, they resemble a heap of glazed doughnuts; the hulking, five-story former mattress factory on Polk, with its big, dark, unboarded, jagged-paned and glassless windows glowering down on the neighborhood; the old men nudging down the street their grocery store shopping carts glistening with crushed aluminum; the mangy stray dogs; the No Help Wanted notice taped behind the caged window of the small steel-parts factory on Flournoy; the graffito on the overhead door of the former warehouse on Lexington: "I Have a Big Dick--Will Kill.
      add

Sequestered[edit]