User:Visviva/Reader 19880429

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-04-29 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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38381 tokens ‧ 30142 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5666 types ‧ 35 (~ 0.618%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-04-29[edit]

  1. antipasti
    • 1988 April 29, Daniel Santow, “Restaurant Tours: guy remembers grandma”, Chicago Reader:
      The short photocopied menu lists only a few antipasti, like mussels in a spicy red sauce for $4.95; several pastas, such as linguine with broccoli at $7.95; and only three entrees (two chicken dishes and veal piccata), ranging from $10.95 to $13.95.
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  2. apartness
    • 1988 April 29, Lawrence Bommer, “Crimes of Freedom”, Chicago Reader:
      Separated, they speak from their own bitter apartness.
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  3. burga
    • 1988 April 29, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      ) Alaska has the burga, a cold northeasterly wind often accompanied by snow.
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  4. cannonlike
    • 1988 April 29, Dan Swain, “Putting on a Show”, Chicago Reader:
      Two young crew members, a man and woman, climb over the towers in the balconies as though they were monkey bars, stringing cable and then attaching small cannonlike lights that they aim at particular spots on the stage.
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  5. divil
    • 1988 April 29, Albert Williams, “Playboy of the West Indes”, Chicago Reader:
      Synge took what could be the stuff of ancient legend--a tall tale about a wandering hero who kills his "divil" of a father and tames the fairest but fieriest maiden in the village--and turned it into a profound, tragicomic study of human nature.
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  6. ghostmeister
    • 1988 April 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Light Fantastic”, Chicago Reader:
      We see only "films" of films, as all of our sight and sensing is illusion, the phantom movies of our encounter with the world, which, remember, is equally phantom, trompe l'oeil of that clown and ghostmeister, the sun.
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  7. lavishers
    • 1988 April 29, Anthony Adler, “The Misanthrope”, Chicago Reader:
      Alceste despises "these lavishers of meaningless embraces .
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  8. mantralike
    • 1988 April 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Light Fantastic”, Chicago Reader:
      In an earlier portion of the same text, Noren provides a striking visual equivalent to this process in an extended stretch of mantralike verse that reproduces the same pulsing and syncopated rhythms--a passage that begins:
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  9. mohawk
    • 1988 April 29, Chris Petrakos, “Bingo Palace”, Chicago Reader:
      Behind a fortress of coffee cups an elderly librarian type scowled at a young girl in garish makeup and a mohawk who was nervously tapping her feet, causing both the table and chair to squeak.
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  10. multiunits
  11. noninterest
    • 1988 April 29, John Conroy, “Follow the Money”, Chicago Reader:
      We ask, 'Who are your close friends and acquaintances?' and 'Have you ever borrowed money, interest bearing or noninterest bearing, something that we can't see on your return, something that wouldn't show up?'" An inheritance, a loan from a personal friend, and reimbursements from people for whom the taxpayer has purchased goods are all factors that would have significant effect on an agent's analysis of a taxpayer's spending power.
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  12. nonnarrative
    • 1988 April 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Light Fantastic”, Chicago Reader:
      Andrew Noren's lovely 59-minute The Lighted Field--part five of his ongoing work The Adventures of the Exquisite Corpse, which has engaged him over the past two decades--belongs mainly to the nonnarrative realm.
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  13. nutsiness
    • 1988 April 29, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      It's sometimes held responsible for the fits of nutsiness that occasionally afflict North Africans, e.g., the Algerian War.
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  14. papagayo
    • 1988 April 29, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      The papagayo is a cold northeasterly wind along the Pacific coast of Nicaragua and Guatemala.
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  15. pipepuffing
    • 1988 April 29, Albert Williams, “Playboy of the West Indes”, Chicago Reader:
      The characters are virtually the same: Christy is now Ken, Pegeen now Peggy; Shawn, Christy's rival for Pegeen's hand, is now Stanley, a timid slave to authority and the action's main comic foil; and Widow Quin, the older woman who competes with Pegeen for Christy's eye, has been transformed into Benin, a crafty, pipepuffing "obeah woman"--a backwoods witch.
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  16. plie
    • 1988 April 29, Cerinda Survant, “The Invisible Dancer”, Chicago Reader:
      A large jump forward into plie alters with each repetition: the gesturing leg extends straight behind, then straight in front, then bends in front.
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  17. postperformance
  18. recits
    • 1988 April 29, Dan Swain, “Putting on a Show”, Chicago Reader:
      "Finally I threw the whole thing out and ended up translating many of the recits from scratch," Larsen says.
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  19. remoisturizing
    • 1988 April 29, John Conroy, “Follow the Money”, Chicago Reader:
      The can was seized soon thereafter, and as the judge's trial got under way, an IRS lab was remoisturizing the ashes and reconstructing checks.
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  20. routeman
    • 1988 April 29, John Conroy, “Follow the Money”, Chicago Reader:
      Czurylo and Thullen tracked down Irving Tomlinson, the retired routeman who had called at the LeFevours'.
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  21. sephardic
    • 1988 April 29, Dan Swain, “Putting on a Show”, Chicago Reader:
      "Monteverdi used what sounds like a Byzantine sephardic chant to charm the furies, but Gluck uses the harp.
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  22. storklike
    • 1988 April 29, Cerinda Survant, “The Invisible Dancer”, Chicago Reader:
      A hovering, storklike balance with the body curling round an unseen sphere--one bent leg raised halfway up in front, bent arms and torso describing the space.
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  23. suprahistorical
    • 1988 April 29, James A. Lewin, “Stage Notes: Shakespeare would have loved it here”, Chicago Reader:
      Director Michael Bogdanov is emphasizing the suprahistorical aspect of Shakespeare's extended study of power by using a mix of contemporary and traditional costumes.
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  24. uncoached
    • 1988 April 29, Lawrence Bommer, “Crimes of Freedom”, Chicago Reader:
      Lennix's Oboza effectively combines an actor's defensive mockery with the man's uncoached fury.
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  25. unornamented
    • 1988 April 29, Cerinda Survant, “The Invisible Dancer”, Chicago Reader:
      The many repetitions of unornamented locomotor movement describing great diagonals do eventually wear.
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  26. unsunken
    • 1988 April 29, Dan Swain, “Putting on a Show”, Chicago Reader:
      Steve Larsen stands in front of the orchestra, which is stuffed into a small, unsunken pit separated from the audience by a waist-high wooden barrier.
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  27. untimid
    • 1988 April 29, Lawrence Bommer, “Crimes of Freedom”, Chicago Reader:
      Matching his risky, full-throttle acting is Julia Smith's very untimid Frieda, a complex woman you want to know longer than the play permits.
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  28. warehousy

Sequestered[edit]