User:Visviva/Reader 19880527

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-05-27 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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38518 tokens ‧ 29397 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5805 types ‧ 47 (~ 0.81%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-05-27[edit]

  1. antiaddiction
    • 1988 May 27, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      The final figure, according to Chicago antiaddiction consultant MariJean Suelzle, is "a conservative estimate" of the amount of money your business loses to alcohol and drug abuse.
      add
  2. authenticists
    • 1988 May 27, James Cappleman, “Divine Righteousness”, Chicago Reader:
      Besides, the authenticists of this age will die out, just like the authenticists of other ages died out, only to be replaced by another batch of them.
      add
  3. bioelectric
    • 1988 May 27, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      (Although, you'd have to think, so does falling water--in which case why resort to negative ions to explain why a rain shower makes the air feel good?) Should this sound too mundane, one researcher I spoke to held out hope for--get ready for this--a "bioelectric" hypothesis.
      add
  4. blimpy
    • 1988 May 27, Laura Molzahn, “Bodily Fears”, Chicago Reader:
      The blimpy costume, roughly humanoid, covered her from the neck to the wrists to the ankles with a plain white muslin fabric (why do we always think of fat people as pale?) stuffed with something airy, perhaps shredded toilet paper.
      add
  5. clearcut
    • 1988 May 27, Laura Molzahn, “Bodily Fears”, Chicago Reader:
      As a simple statement with a single point of view that produces a clearcut response, Fat works.
      add
  6. coltlike
    • 1988 May 27, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Imagine that cow we compared him to suddenly breaking into a coltlike canter.
      add
  7. cornichons
    • 1988 May 27, Sondra Rosenberg, “Restaurant Tours: a bargain verging on a steal”, Chicago Reader:
      Garnished with excellent Dijon-style mustard, horseradish, cornichons, sprinkled with diced gelee, it was close to perfection as one is likely to get on a dinner plate.
      add
  8. dehanchement
    • 1988 May 27, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      He is a large man (larger now), and he stood on the mound in what we referred to in art class as the dehanchement pose, in which most of the subject's weight is rested on one leg, giving the body, supposedly, a graceful S-curve from bottom to top .
      add
  9. downturned
    • 1988 May 27, Laura Molzahn, “Bodily Fears”, Chicago Reader:
      Wearing a partial mask that gives him a pronounced hook nose and downturned mouth, the Hypochondriac is both infantile and aged.
      add
  10. fantasyland
  11. fouette
    • 1988 May 27, Sarah Kaufman, “Rehearsal”, Chicago Reader:
      Parker executes a series of fouette turns, banging a tambourine each time she whips around.
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  12. haircutter
    • 1988 May 27, Judith Moore, “Gordon Cruse Lost 236 Pounds”, Chicago Reader:
      His haircutter suggected that Cruse now looks like actor Jack Nicholson.
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  13. incorporators
    • 1988 May 27, M. Treloar, “Is Anybody Watching?”, Chicago Reader:
      A group of "incorporators," chosen by Mayor Byrne and various civic groups, selected the first 50-member board, and since then the membership has been self-selecting, the board itself choosing new members as old ones leave or their terms expire.
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  14. juried
    • 1988 May 27, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      There will probably be images of Harold Washington at the juried Columbia College student art exhibition but they're not likely to ruffle feathers the way David Nelson's Mirth and Girth did at the School of the Art Institute.
      add
  15. liberationist
    • 1988 May 27, Albert Williams, “The Fifth Sun”, Chicago Reader:
      Since the Nuncio, the papal representative who opposes Romero's liberationist stance, is a major character throughout the play's action, this woman missed a good deal of what was going on in the first act; but the fault was not hers.)
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  16. mache
  17. mascaraed
    • 1988 May 27, Anthony Adler, “The Hitler-Reagan Equation”, Chicago Reader:
      Baz, a mascaraed gay man who agitates on behalf of the libido.
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  18. mostaccioli
    • 1988 May 27, Barbara W. Siebel, “Tina and Rosie's Farewell”, Chicago Reader:
      My husband provided the keg of beer and Tina made huge bowls of mostaccioli (not lasagna, never in ten years lasagna!).
      add
  19. multiflora
    • 1988 May 27, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      The devil weeds include such former "good guys" as crown vetch, multiflora rose, and autumn olive.
      add
  20. nonswimmer
  21. panpipe
    • 1988 May 27, Neil Tesser, “Albert Mangelsdorff”, Chicago Reader:
      No matter that the trombone would seem to be an instrument particularly ill-suited to the purpose; in Mangelsdorff's hands, it might as well be anything from a panpipe to a cello.
      add
  22. playcable
    • 1988 May 27, M. Treloar, “Is Anybody Watching?”, Chicago Reader:
      Among the promises being bandied about when Chicago began considering its cable TV franchises were "security services, playcable, home banking, software access, subscriber polling, text retrieval, electronic messaging, meter reading .
      add
  23. positionings
    • 1988 May 27, Laura Molzahn, “Bodily Fears”, Chicago Reader:
      Still, during the lyrical, meditative section that preceded the end I felt Puszczewicz was reaching for drama: too many pointed balletic flourishes, too many careful positionings of the arms and hands after an overdramatic pose had been laboriously achieved.
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  24. restreeting
    • 1988 May 27, Ben Joravsky, “Will Oak Park destroy its mall in order to save it?”, Chicago Reader:
      There are seven trustees on the board, although only six will vote: Board President Clifford Osborn admitted to having attended an Indianapolis Colts football game as the guest of Robert Irsay, who not only owns the team but property on the mall and favors restreeting.
      add
  25. rottenest
    • 1988 May 27, M. Treloar, “Is Anybody Watching?”, Chicago Reader:
      In May, Channel 19 viewers can watch The Sheridans of Chicago, a half-hour prime-time soap opera about "Chicago's oldest, richest, and rottenest" family, which appears every other Tuesday at 9 PM.
      add
  26. twitticisms
    • 1988 May 27, Lawrence Bommer, “Tom and Viv”, Chicago Reader:
      Jim Zulevic plays Viv's conformist brother ("The bohemian life is dicey" and "Life is thin," among his twitticisms).
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  27. unbohemian
    • 1988 May 27, Lawrence Bommer, “Tom and Viv”, Chicago Reader:
      Eliot found Viv's escapades embarrassing at best; his influential Bloomsbury friends attacked Viv as unbohemian (Virginia Woolf called her a "bag of parrots" and Katherine Mansfield exclaimed, "You've married an illiterate beast!
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  28. unconsummatable
    • 1988 May 27, Laura Molzahn, “Bodily Fears”, Chicago Reader:
      Their final embrace makes it painfully obvious that because their torsos are forever oriented in opposite directions, their relationship is unconsummatable.
      add
  29. unreplaced

Sequestered[edit]

  1. multo -- seldom used (and should be molto)
    • 1988 May 27, Sarah Kaufman, “Rehearsal”, Chicago Reader:
      "This piece has to be played with multo conviction!
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  2. releve -- misspelling of relevé?
    • 1988 May 27, Laura Molzahn, “Bodily Fears”, Chicago Reader:
      At the beginning of Changes, dancer Hubbell is poised in second-position releve.
      add
  3. dum
    • 1988 May 27, Sarah Kaufman, “Rehearsal”, Chicago Reader:
      "Dee dee dum?
      add