User:Visviva/Reader 19880701

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
← Previous (1988-06-24) Words harvested from the Chicago Reader, 1988-07-01
  • List status: open
→ Next (1988-07-08)

This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-07-01 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

[ see all Reader pages ] - [ see all tracking lists ]

41806 tokens ‧ 32042 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5714 types ‧ 40 (~ 0.7%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-07-01[edit]

  1. aikuchi
    • 1988 July 1, Holly Greenhagen, “Stage Business: the fight's the thing”, Chicago Reader:
      The play's time-travel element allowed them to stage fights using weapons from different eras: three sizes of broadswords, the largest a two-handed model that is five feet, six inches long and weighs eight pounds; rapiers from France, Italy, and Japan, including a French shell-hilt rapier, whose blade consists of two perpendicular surfaces; various daggers, among them an aikuchi, a type of Japanese suicide knife; a lead pipe; and a gun.
      add
  2. bumhood
    • 1988 July 1, Lawrence Bommer, “Channel This, or Die, Yuppie Scum!; Time in a Battle”, Chicago Reader:
      ); Jeff Michalski, with a giant, used condom on his head, praises his "mental prophylactic" as the perfect way to get sex out of anyone's mind; Barnes does a soul-stirring, semisalacious "Democratic Party Rap" (the only political piece here--odd in an election year), plus a derelict's hymn to the glories of bumhood, set to Springsteen's "Thunder Road"; a Masterpiece Theatre story develops into a strange tongue-twisting contest; and inevitably, Bartles and Jaymes sell cocaine in a folksy commercial.
      add
  3. cartoonlike
    • 1988 July 1, Tom Boeker, “Little Caesar”, Chicago Reader:
      The gangsters use "dese and dose" accents, the props are cartoonlike (dollar bills the size of legal paper and cardboard cutout guns), and the acting style is distinguished by histrionic poses.
      add
  4. coconcertmaster
    • 1988 July 1, Dennis Polkow, “Bernsteinmania”, Chicago Reader:
      Bernstein's layering of timbre was especially well handled during the superb violin solo played by coconcertmaster Sam Magad.
      add
  5. coinventor
  6. coleader
    • 1988 July 1, Neil Tesser, “Fred Simon Group”, Chicago Reader:
      After a decade of Chicago visibility (as coleader of the old Simon and Bard group), and with a big-time new album (on Windham Hill), Simon and his music are known quantities to many listeners.
      add
  7. ensembling
    • 1988 July 1, Dennis Polkow, “Bernsteinmania”, Chicago Reader:
      The first movement was given a treatment full of atmosphere, and yet the orchestra's ensembling and entrances were kept as clean as possible.
      add
  8. extrasocietal
    • 1988 July 1, Brian L. Leo, “A Mason's Grace”, Chicago Reader:
      "On the square," Cecil, refers to the fairness with which we are expected to act (confer the phrase "on the level" in ordinary parlance), not to some secret, extrasocietal duty.
      add
  9. fireballing
    • 1988 July 1, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Where the Boys Are”, Chicago Reader:
      LaLoosh is a young comer, a pea-brained but eager pitcher described in the movies press materials as "a fireballing bonus baby with a high hard one that cracks the radar gun at 98 on the rare occasions that it wanders near the strike zones" (sic).
      add
  10. headground
    • 1988 July 1, Kitry Krause, “Child in the Streets”, Chicago Reader:
      I felt as though I were making some very great headground as far as the occult was concerned, and as far as ritual magic was concerned, and the ability to manipulate pure energy.
      add
  11. hightopped
    • 1988 July 1, Bryan Miller, “A Gathering of Scots”, Chicago Reader:
      He wore a headband, a single silver earring, hightopped Nikes over his knee socks, a red "Highland Games" tank top, and an enormous kilt bound by a wide red-white-and-blue belt.
      add
  12. imagist
  13. machinelike
    • 1988 July 1, Laura Molzahn, “Private Puritan”, Chicago Reader:
      She achieved the movement by propelling herself through a series of balances, her arms and legs moving slowly and continuously, almost machinelike.
      add
  14. motific
    • 1988 July 1, Dennis Polkow, “Bernsteinmania”, Chicago Reader:
      The folk fugue of the second movement was played with precision and meaning, and the movement's overall motific unity and form were well brought out.
      add
  15. nonnarrative
    • 1988 July 1, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Aria”, Chicago Reader:
      The former, an admittedly perverse nonnarrative depiction of amour fou in a body-building gym, beautifully composed and adroitly mixing music and sound effects, shows the most intelligent match of sound and visuals.
      add
  16. overplotted
  17. overscaled
    • 1988 July 1, Ed Zotti, “Cityscape: This Is Your Library”, Chicago Reader:
      We see two instances of this in the library design: the glass curtain wall on the Plymouth Court side, which clashes so sharply with the masonry treatment of the other facades, and the comically overscaled sculptural effusions at the roofline.
      add
  18. politicide
    • 1988 July 1, Jay Edelman, “Don't Feature This Teacher”, Chicago Reader:
      The choice of Peter Yarrow, a faded flower of the drug-ridden sixties, as the principal speaker offended many of us who strongly feel the need to defend Israel against PLO politicide and terrorism.
      add
  19. prelims
    • 1988 July 1, Achy Obejas, “Waiting for the Blow”, Chicago Reader:
      As the two men settled in to watch the prelims, the warm-up fights before the big one, more and more people noticed them and stopped to check out the TVs in the back of the car.
      add
  20. romanticizer
    • 1988 July 1, Bryan Miller, “A Gathering of Scots”, Chicago Reader:
      Robert Burns--the poet who, along with the romanticizer Walter Scott, popularized Scotland, its then-backward people, and its dialect--was honored with candles bearing his image, thimbles in the shape of his head, and the usual tea towels.
      add
  21. semisalacious
    • 1988 July 1, Lawrence Bommer, “Channel This, or Die, Yuppie Scum!; Time in a Battle”, Chicago Reader:
      ); Jeff Michalski, with a giant, used condom on his head, praises his "mental prophylactic" as the perfect way to get sex out of anyone's mind; Barnes does a soul-stirring, semisalacious "Democratic Party Rap" (the only political piece here--odd in an election year), plus a derelict's hymn to the glories of bumhood, set to Springsteen's "Thunder Road"; a Masterpiece Theatre story develops into a strange tongue-twisting contest; and inevitably, Bartles and Jaymes sell cocaine in a folksy commercial.
      add
  22. sheepherding
    • 1988 July 1, Bryan Miller, “A Gathering of Scots”, Chicago Reader:
      A gaggle of pipe and drum bands warmed up for the competitions of the afternoon, and around a pen filled with a dozen tiny, shaggy sheep from the sheepherding competition a group of sturdy young men with numbers on their backs slouched around a dusty field, occasionally windarms.
      add
  23. tams
    • 1988 July 1, Bryan Miller, “A Gathering of Scots”, Chicago Reader:
      Despite the blaze of sunshine, woolens were everywhere: tams, kilts, socks drawn up to knobby knees.
      add
  24. undeterminable
    • 1988 July 1, Bryan Miller, “A Gathering of Scots”, Chicago Reader:
      My eye was caught by number 112, a monstrous fellow of an undeterminable age with a once-shaved head that had grown spiky and a beard of the same length.
      add
  25. unevocative
    • 1988 July 1, Albert Williams, “Family Secrets”, Chicago Reader:
      But Dennis McCullough's staging of the piece--his first directorial effort at Stage Left since taking over as the company's artistic director--is one-dimensional and unevocative; the pacing is tepid and the comic timing flaccid.
      add
  26. yuppettes
    • 1988 July 1, Lawrence Bommer, “Channel This, or Die, Yuppie Scum!; Time in a Battle”, Chicago Reader:
      The other--California-cool yuppettes sharing Roseanne Roseannadanna-style embarrassments, like sneezing so hard you drive a cocktail straw up your nose--seems too clearly the women's version of the men's childbirth gross-outs.
      add

Sequestered[edit]

  1. dese - entry-worthy?
    • 1988 July 1, Tom Boeker, “Little Caesar”, Chicago Reader:
      The gangsters use "dese and dose" accents, the props are cartoonlike (dollar bills the size of legal paper and cardboard cutout guns), and the acting style is distinguished by histrionic poses.
      add
  2. windarms - text corrupted?
    • 1988 July 1, Bryan Miller, “A Gathering of Scots”, Chicago Reader:
      A gaggle of pipe and drum bands warmed up for the competitions of the afternoon, and around a pen filled with a dozen tiny, shaggy sheep from the sheepherding competition a group of sturdy young men with numbers on their backs slouched around a dusty field, occasionally windarms.
      add