User:Visviva/Reader 19880708

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-07-08 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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39131 tokens ‧ 29406 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5596 types ‧ 70 (~ 1.251%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-07-08[edit]

  1. analingual
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      Some are so intensely private they make you feel like a voyeur--James Joyce's salaciously analingual letters to his wife, at the opposite extreme.
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  2. antiapartheid
    • 1988 July 8, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “A World Apart”, Chicago Reader:
      A white, middle-class antiapartheid activist (Barbara Hershey) is arrested for her activities after her husband has had to leave the country for related reasons, and her 13-year-old daughter (Jodhi May), through whose eyes much of the story is told, has to adjust to the breakup of her home.
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  3. antiauteurist
    • 1988 July 8, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Portfolio Without Artist”, Chicago Reader:
      If Huston can be described as an auteur at all, he is certainly the antiauteurist auteur par excellence.
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  4. antigun
    • 1988 July 8, Bryan Miller, “Gun Man”, Chicago Reader:
      After I did the Merri Dee show, which is a black TV show, where the hostess was antigun, a black clerk in a store came up to me, and told me she saw it and listened.
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  5. antihandgun
    • 1988 July 8, Bryan Miller, “Gun Man”, Chicago Reader:
      Ironically, what most Oak Parkers don't realize is that thanks to an almost entirely unpublicized component of Oak Park's antihandgun ordinance, anyone willing to sign up with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms as a collector and plunk down $30 for a Federal Firearms Owner's License can legally collect and hold virtually any kind of weapon she or he pleases for the next three years.
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  6. antiracist
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      It's hard to see how you get from this Mark Twain to the one who wrote Huckleberry Finn, and yet while he was in Nevada, Twain was circulating antiracist humor among his friends.
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  7. arak
    • 1988 July 8, Victor A. Friedman, “Improvising Absinthe”, Chicago Reader:
      Pernod is 80.2 proof whereas Greek ouzo, as well as Arabic arak and Turkish raki, are available at 90 proof and higher.
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  8. aroog
    • 1988 July 8, Lawrence Rand, “Restaurant Tours: dinner in a strange land”, Chicago Reader:
      Featured appetizers are aroog (minced chicken fritters) and tomato palak bhat (tomato/spinach/rice cakes); the entrees are green peppers and shrimp in sesame seed sauce, and roasted snapper with walnut chutney.
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  9. auteurist
    • 1988 July 8, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Portfolio Without Artist”, Chicago Reader:
      Rediscovered and applauded by some of his former adversaries (including Sarris) in the 70s with Fat City, The Man Who Would Be King, and Wise Blood, Huston then promptly shattered most of their auteurist hopes and expectations with his next three features--Phobia, Victory, and Annie, all of them unabashed commercial assignments to which he brought little interest or distinction.
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  10. bollixing
  11. cardplayer
    • 1988 July 8, Diana Spinrad, “Tango; Chicago Young Playwrights Festival”, Chicago Reader:
      The mother, Eleanor, is having an affair with Eddie, an absurdly simple proletarian; grandmother Eugenia is a fanatic cardplayer; and cousin Ala sees life as a chance to play sexual games.
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  12. centerless
    • 1988 July 8, Renaldo Migaldi, “Tribe”, Chicago Reader:
      Tribe's music, while enormous in its emotional range, tends to be as nervous as it is optimistic, but the band's constant jumping from one style to another seems less a centerless eclecticism than an explosive urge to be everywhere at once, to leave no stone unturned in the search for life and newness.
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  13. cerebralism
  14. coowner
  15. dratted
  16. eggheaded
    • 1988 July 8, Neil Tesser, “Rova Saxophone Quartet/Henry Threadgill Sextet”, Chicago Reader:
      But that statement suggests some sort of eggheaded emotionlessness, which is not the case: there's real passion throughout this music, whether it stems from the commitment to extended improvisation or the sheer timbral joy of sax.
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  17. emotionlessness
    • 1988 July 8, Neil Tesser, “Rova Saxophone Quartet/Henry Threadgill Sextet”, Chicago Reader:
      But that statement suggests some sort of eggheaded emotionlessness, which is not the case: there's real passion throughout this music, whether it stems from the commitment to extended improvisation or the sheer timbral joy of sax.
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  18. impersonality
    • 1988 July 8, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Portfolio Without Artist”, Chicago Reader:
      Yet paradoxically, Huston being Huston, its most personal quality is the director's self-effacement, its impersonality.
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  19. involvements
    • 1988 July 8, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Portfolio Without Artist”, Chicago Reader:
      His colorful life span might be regarded as the story of an adventurer rather than that of an artist; despite his lengthy involvements in many of the arts--painting, fiction, theater, and film--one often feels from his autobiography that it was the adventures that counted most for him.
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  20. klutzes
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      Orion never was very good at following instructions--his reputation as one of the great hapless klutzes among literary relatives only grows more secure as more of Mark Twain's private papers come to light--nor apparently was the young writer's mother.
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  21. koken
  22. manipulativeness
    • 1988 July 8, Bryan Miller, “Gun Man”, Chicago Reader:
      I'm afraid that either through your manipulativeness or my stupidity, I'll say something and look like I'm--I have no comment on Mr. Zangrilli. At all. I have no comment, whatever.
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  23. muttonchop
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      Not only are there photos of young Sam from age 17 (the impudence softened a few degrees, with watchful eyes, tousled, thick, wavy black hair, and full, pouting, sensual lips) to 30 (with the hair even wavier and muttonchop whiskers framing those same sensual lips; then with the sideburns gone and the lips hidden by that public act of privacy, the mustache)--there are also photos of his family, friends, and acquaintances, reproductions of manuscript pages, detailed maps of the Nevada mining regions Twain explored, and illustrations of some of the buildings, places, and events he described.
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  24. nondirective
  25. outcounterpunched
    • 1988 July 8, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Quite simply, he outcounterpunched Spinks immediately.
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  26. pelinkovac
    • 1988 July 8, Victor A. Friedman, “Improvising Absinthe”, Chicago Reader:
      Absinthe tastes and smells like a cross between ouzo and pelinkovac.
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  27. perplexingly
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      But the private life of Mark Twain has always remained persistently, perplexingly, perniciously beyond our grasp.
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  28. prefight
    • 1988 July 8, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Then came the long prefight production, including taped interviews with Tyson and Spinks, and then the actual coverage of the usual prefight rigmarole.
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  29. rehabber
    • 1988 July 8, Michael H. Brownstein, “Dope House”, Chicago Reader:
      "I'm a rehabber.
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  30. rovings
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      These are the years of his youthful rovings as an itinerant printer, of his career as a Mississippi River boat pilot, of his journey to the west with Orion and adventures in Nevada prospecting, of his Nevada and San Francisco journalism, "The Celebrated Jumping Frog," the trip to the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), and his first lecture tour--the years when Samuel Langhorne Clemens became Mark Twain.
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  31. sabor
    • 1988 July 8, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      When Victor and the gang heat up the floor at the Moosehead Bar & Grill, it's pure sabor.
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  32. secesh
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      The claims Twain was working in Aurora were on land claimed by California, and the pro-California party in Aurora were vocal "secesh" sympathizers.
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  33. semiflirtatious
    • 1988 July 8, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Celine and Julie Go Boating”, Chicago Reader:
      Its slow, sensual beginning stages a mysterious, semiflirtatious meeting between a shy librarian (Dominique Labourier) and a nightclub magician (Juliet Berto).
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  34. shirted
  35. sitdown
  36. teetotaling
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      And his growing impatience and anger with Orion comes through clearly in his business-filled letters to him--especially when Twain has finally succeeded in finding a buyer for the family's problematic Tennessee land, the sale of which would provide much needed cash for the strapped San Francisco journalist and prevent the loss of the land for unpaid taxes, only to have the newly teetotaling Orion nix the deal because the purchaser wants to grow wine grapes.
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  37. tootski
  38. underskilled
  39. undyingly
    • 1988 July 8, Bryan Miller, “Gun Man”, Chicago Reader:
      Jim has kind of followed the chain of events, and followed them undyingly.
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  40. unfogged
  41. unharnessed
    • 1988 July 8, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      As we left the Auditorium, talking about the fight under the marquee lights, Boomer said the one abiding emotion he felt was fear--fear that someone could be at once so destructive and indestructible, unharnessed and yet entirely focused.
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  42. unmellifluous
    • 1988 July 8, Bryan Miller, “Gun Man”, Chicago Reader:
      His typewriter is rarely still; his unmellifluous voice is frequently heard on radio and television.
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  43. unreluctantly
  44. whitehaired
    • 1988 July 8, Robert Hurwitt, “Reading: Semisincerely, Mark Twain”, Chicago Reader:
      Meanwhile the Mark Twain that emerges from his letters so far is the same one that David Levine portrayed in a memorable New York Review of Books cartoon: the author, in his classic whitehaired, white-suited guise, seated at his desk, taking dictation from a scruffy Huck Finn seated beside him.
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  45. yuppification
    • 1988 July 8, Ed Zotti, “Fourth of July, Out by Circle”, Chicago Reader:
      The local community group has been plumping for University Village, which reeks of yuppification and middle-class morality.
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Sequestered[edit]