User:Visviva/Reader 19880715

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-07-15 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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39812 tokens ‧ 30485 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5971 types ‧ 70 (~ 1.172%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-07-15[edit]

  1. adelita
    • 1988 July 15, David Fremon, “Look-Alike Contest”, Chicago Reader:
      An employee of the city's Latino Affairs Commission, she looks like an adelita (a woman soldier and camp follower) in her blouse, long skirt, and sash crisscrossing her chest.
      add
  2. aieeee
  3. amateurists
    • 1988 July 15, Franklin Soults, “Camper Van Beethoven”, Chicago Reader:
      It's romantic, simpleminded, and ultimately self-defeating to equate authenticity exclusively with amateurism, and though the musicians in Camper Van Beethoven have made their most unique, "natural" and compelling music as hard-core amateurists, they're also smart and honest enough to face the facts: By now, they know how to play their instruments pretty damn well.
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  4. antiurban
    • 1988 July 15, Lawrence Rand, “Funny Business: an entire evening with Ian Shoales”, Chicago Reader:
      When I ask why so much of the humor on National Public Radio is antiurban, Kessler responds with one of Ian Shoales's most quoted lines: "If the city were a nice place to live, nobody would want to live there.
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  5. awshucks
    • 1988 July 15, Anthony Adler, “Existential Vaudeville”, Chicago Reader:
      And the awshucks summing up, where he 'lows as how "you could say that Bad Moon is a homage, of sorts, to all my favorite western films and novels.
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  6. bigcity
    • 1988 July 15, Tom Valeo, “Happy Happy Good Show”, Chicago Reader:
      One prolonged skit, for example, involves two southern crackers who sit outside a gas station making fun of all the bigcity types who drive in expecting big-city services.
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  7. bitchfest
    • 1988 July 15, Tom Boeker, “Look Back in Anger”, Chicago Reader:
      The problem is that without some good acting this play, like Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, can devolve into an exhausting, none-too-enlightening bitchfest.
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  8. bithespians
    • 1988 July 15, Tom Valeo, “Happy Happy Good Show”, Chicago Reader:
      In one of the audition segments, Bob Odenkirk and Conan O'Brien are wonderfully manic as "bithespians" who team up to give a single performance--O'Brien does the visual aspect, while Odenkirk provides the vocals.
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  9. blackrimmed
    • 1988 July 15, David Fremon, “Look-Alike Contest”, Chicago Reader:
      Cortez wears a white shirt, jade necklace, and thick blackrimmed glasses.
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  10. bluestem
    • 1988 July 15, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      The byssus, Panzer thinks, feeds exclusively on big bluestem grass, a dominant plant of our native prairies.
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  11. boxiness
    • 1988 July 15, Neil Tesser, “Les DeMerle Transfusion”, Chicago Reader:
      Sometimes that leads to a certain boxiness in the sound; more often, it generates a lot of power, and serves as a launch pad for Nick Drozdoff (trumpet), Bob Fredricks (tenor), and John Kaplan (alto, soprano, and flute).
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  12. clienteles
    • 1988 July 15, Pamela Jameson, “The End of the Rainbow”, Chicago Reader:
      And of course the differences (which extended to such things as parking spaces and shopping carts) were soon reflected in the two stores' clienteles.
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  13. clunkiness
    • 1988 July 15, Tom Boeker, “Look Back in Anger”, Chicago Reader:
      Most of the shallowness and clunkiness of the production can be traced back to a fundamental mistake in Jimmy's characterization: he is wholly self-absorbed.
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  14. danciest
    • 1988 July 15, Sarah Kaufman, “Dance & More for $1.98”, Chicago Reader:
      Joseph Holmes Dance Theatre member Darrian Ford and JHDT instructor Winifred Haun teamed up in Long Lunch, the danciest piece on the program.
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  15. dogbane
    • 1988 July 15, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      One short stretch of the path was bordered by Indian hemp, a species of dogbane, that was just coming into flower.
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  16. estoril
    • 1988 July 15, Sondra Rosenberg, “Restaurant Tours: Brazil, Portugal, and Albany Park”, Chicago Reader:
      Camarao estoril sol, from Portugal ($5.25), turned out to be three medium-sized, somewhat rubbery shrimp in a delicately sweetened, light-bodied sauce redolent of herbs and garlic.
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  17. fouettes
    • 1988 July 15, Sarah Kaufman, “Dance & More for $1.98”, Chicago Reader:
      In the waltzier section, Haun and Ford whipped themselves into a fever of fouettes and pirouettes, each upstaging the other with "Yeah?
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  18. fritillaries
    • 1988 July 15, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      We saw two kinds of fritillaries, orange-and-black butterflies that are among the largest and showiest we have.
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  19. gypsylike
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      And Stevens, a burly, bearded 26-year-old, is as much a stage manager as this gypsylike collective has.
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  20. hogshit
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      He was looking for a theatrical style that probed serious questions "instead of the American style of avant-garde theater, of throwing your arms around each other and going 'Baby you're beautiful,' which I always thought was hogshit.
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  21. interworkings
    • 1988 July 15, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Asya's Happiness”, Chicago Reader:
      Many of the men in the cast relate anecdotes about war and postwar experiences that are gripping and authentic, the interworkings of the community are lovingly detailed, and the handling of the heroine and her boyfriends is refreshingly candid without ever being didactic or sensationalist.
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  22. martians
    • 1988 July 15, Diana Spinrad, “The Woods”, Chicago Reader:
      When Nick talks about his neighbor being carried off by martians, for instance, or during a storm, when Nick's thoughts begin to rage, the music clues the audience in on the seething undercurrent of tension, and provides textual builds that the actors unfortunately don't.
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  23. minimart
    • 1988 July 15, Tom Valeo, “Happy Happy Good Show”, Chicago Reader:
      The joke is that these two men are sitting in front of a gas station that has been transformed into a minimart capable of supplying anything--even the kosher pickled herring requested by an Orthodox Jew.
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  24. modelish
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      Her fellow San Franciscan Fraser is a long-haired, 24-year-old ex-baseball player with rugged, modelish looks.
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  25. multitiered
    • 1988 July 15, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “City of Angels”, Chicago Reader:
      The main humans who are followed by the angels in this section are Homer (Curt Bois), an elderly and retired professor who visits the National Library and strolls across the depleted Potsdamer Platz, recalling the shops and cafes that used to be there; Marion (Solveig Dommartin), the mortal with whom Damiel falls in love, a French trapeze artist in the Circus Alekan who after rehearsing her act retreats to her trailer to listen to music and reflect on her loneliness; and Peter Falk, playing himself (and reportedly collaborating on his own effective dialogue), an American movie star playing a detective in a film set in the Berlin of 1945, on a location consisting of the remains of a multitiered World War II bunker.
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  26. nonfacial
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      Commedia dell'arte techniques are also part of the preparation-highly stylized, acrobatic physical skills designed to develop nonfacial physical expressiveness for mask-wearing performers.
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  27. nonprison
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      It has also performed in Canada, England, and Ireland, and in Scotland, where it made a rare nonprison appearance at the 1986 Edinburgh Theatre Festival Fringe.
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  28. oversalted
    • 1988 July 15, Sondra Rosenberg, “Restaurant Tours: Brazil, Portugal, and Albany Park”, Chicago Reader:
      On one occasion the caldo verde succeeded admirably, flavors and texture nicely balanced; on another, the sausage had unaccountably been omitted and the broth oversalted.
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  29. plie
    • 1988 July 15, Cerinda Survant, “Janet Skidmore and Bryan Saner”, Chicago Reader:
      "Swing Low" begins with the torso swinging from side to side with a deep plie step for every musical stress.
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  30. proboscises
    • 1988 July 15, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      These moths hover in front of flowers in the manner of hummingbirds, inserting their long proboscises into flowers in search of nectar.
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  31. rancheros
    • 1988 July 15, David Fremon, “Look-Alike Contest”, Chicago Reader:
      A straw hat, the type Mexican rancheros wear, covers a thick, white ponytail.
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  32. reencountering
    • 1988 July 15, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “City of Angels”, Chicago Reader:
      Happily entering the material world, Damiel sells his angelic breastplate at a junk shop in order to buy a loud, checked jacket; reencountering Falk, he discovers that the movie star was once an angel, too.
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  33. seethrough
    • 1988 July 15, Sarah Kaufman, “Dance & More for $1.98”, Chicago Reader:
      Three of the dancers are in individual boxes with seethrough plastic sides.
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  34. seg
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      Rehearsal time for a Con-Artistes show can run anywhere from three to nine months; when a prisoner is transferred or paroled or sent to "seg" (segregation) or hauled back into court, they don't ask if he's busy with a lead role in a play.
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  35. siders
    • 1988 July 15, Pamela Jameson, “The End of the Rainbow”, Chicago Reader:
      In its heyday, in the early 80s, the Rainbow was a regular monthly stop for health-conscious South siders and suburbanites who couldn't find natural foods in their own areas.
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  36. socalled
  37. spacewomen
    • 1988 July 15, Sarah Kaufman, “Dance & More for $1.98”, Chicago Reader:
      Do the ridiculous-looking spacewomen symbolize oppressors in general, imprisoning and manipulating the oppressed?
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  38. styrofoam
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      On the edge of one table are some styrofoam cups and a very large thermos containing some very strong coffee.
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  39. subscenes
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      When Bergman is through he ha's a gigantic stage picture, focused on the tightrope walker but brimming with life in its individual subscenes.
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  40. theatricalize
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      Bergman and his actors have been developing "metaphors" with which to theatricalize this theme, and now--today's jaunt is the second day of a two-day visit arranged by Vera Cunningham--they are seeing how their ideas play with the guys at Stateville,
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  41. traumatization
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      In workshops, the guys talk about 'a door I don't want to open, a dark place.' It's got victims in it, memories of abuse and assault, early traumatization they suffered--physical and sexual abuse and small moments where they were slighted.
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  42. undeeded
    • 1988 July 15, Lawrence Bommer, “The Oldest Living Graduate”, Chicago Reader:
      Kinkaid's wealthy, ambitious son Floyd, frustrated at his inability to escape his father's shadow, wants to turn the colonel's last undeeded tract of land into a "rich and exclusive" resort.
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  43. undermedicated
    • 1988 July 15, Tom Boeker, “Look Back in Anger”, Chicago Reader:
      For instance, Jimmy's radical mood swings, particularly between the affection and abuse that he shows Alison, are inexplicable, like the behavior of an undermedicated schizophrenic.
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  44. unengaged
    • 1988 July 15, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Asya's Happiness”, Chicago Reader:
      Originally entitled The Story of Asya Machina, Who Loved a Man but Did Not Marry Him Because She Was Proud, Andrei Mikhalkov-Konchalovsky's remarkable 1967 depiction of life on a collective farm, one of his best films, was shelved by Soviet authorities for 20 years, apparently because its crippled heroine is pregnant but unengaged and because the overall depiction of Soviet rural life is decidedly less than glamorous.
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  45. unposh
    • 1988 July 15, Albert Williams, “Prison Drama”, Chicago Reader:
      "We were doing things like the Tibetan Book of the Dead [for] French peasants, and a Wilhelm Reich-influenced Romeo and Juliet that involved making prolonged sexual contact with the audience," he says in his nasal, edgy, unposh British accent.
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  46. untherapeutic
  47. untraditional
  48. waltzier
    • 1988 July 15, Sarah Kaufman, “Dance & More for $1.98”, Chicago Reader:
      In the waltzier section, Haun and Ford whipped themselves into a fever of fouettes and pirouettes, each upstaging the other with "Yeah?
      add
  49. worldweary
    • 1988 July 15, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “City of Angels”, Chicago Reader:
      Cassiel, more worldweary, decides to go on with his angelic knowledge and become Berlin's collective memory and conscience.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. hombre - just code-switching in context