User:Visviva/Reader 19880729

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-07-29 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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40161 tokens ‧ 30818 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5863 types ‧ 64 (~ 1.092%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-07-29[edit]

  1. addictionology
    • 1988 July 29, Laurence Gonzales, “When Doctors Are Addicts”, Chicago Reader:
      Yet few doctors (other than the fairly small number of specialists in addictionology who have recently arrived on the scene) are able to recognize primary addictive disease either in themselves or in their colleagues.
      add
  2. antimedical
    • 1988 July 29, Laurence Gonzales, “When Doctors Are Addicts”, Chicago Reader:
      Just as there has been an anti-AA bias in the psychiatric and medical communities, so there is sometimes an antimedical, antiscience tendency within AA.
      add
  3. associatively
    • 1988 July 29, Anthony Adler, “Carnival Shoes”, Chicago Reader:
      Tirabassi and Peditto tend to communicate abstractly, associatively, through their images.
      add
  4. bogeywoman
    • 1988 July 29, Lawrence Bommer, “Sex and Death in Chile”, Chicago Reader:
      It's tempting to imagine this madonna/whore Teresa in any number of roles--as Kafka's bogeywoman, who keeps respectable folk in sexual thrall; as the antidote to stultifying tradition; as the reflection of a true purity that can delight men far more than the sisters' blatant propriety; or as simply the spooky, melodramatic demon, who lurks in sealed rooms like Rochester's wife in Jane Eyre.
      add
  5. bootlicking
    • 1988 July 29, Michael Miner, “Screwed by the Sun-Times, Part 2; Position Wanted”, Chicago Reader:
      And even though no one ever loved him, they liked him a hell of a lot better that year than they liked the bootlicking vice-president he was running against, the retiring president's kiss-ass toady who got fed his balls every day for breakfast and asked for seconds.
      add
  6. brontosaurian
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      But the bureaucracy remains essentially brontosaurian, a beast with different brains to govern different parts of its body.
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  7. codirector
    • 1988 July 29, Diana Spinrad, “Burnin' With the 8 Ball”, Chicago Reader:
      Larocca is further hampered by his codirector, John Harriman.
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  8. colorized
    • 1988 July 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Female Trouble”, Chicago Reader:
      Meanwhile, having failed to copyright Night of the Living Dead at the time of its completion, Romero was helpless when it fell into the public domain and unable to prevent either a colorized version or two unauthorized sequels (The Return of the Living Dead parts one and two) from flooding the market--all of which helped obscure the achievement of his Dead trilogy, which stands as one of the American cinema's key works of the past two decades, not only as horror films but as radical and provocative satires of middle America during the same period.
      add
  9. counterattacked
    • 1988 July 29, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      The styrofoam cup industry, fearing that the jig was up, promptly counterattacked.
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  10. cowriter
    • 1988 July 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “A Fish Called Wanda”, Chicago Reader:
      Charles Crichton, the septuagenarian British director who made his biggest mark with The Lavender Hill Mob in 1951, teams up with actor, cowriter, and executive producer John Cleese to make a madcap caper comedy about another large-scale robbery that is every bit as funny as its predecessor.
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  11. crudite
    • 1988 July 29, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      We've built five-foot pyramids of toast surrounded by golden caviar for a group of Egyptologists, constructed Art Deco crudite buildings, and even had anatomically correct birthday cakes carried in by topless waiters and waitresses.
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  12. distrib
    • 1988 July 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Female Trouble”, Chicago Reader:
      After Walter Reade finally picked up the film for distribution, Variety's reviewer wrote, "This film casts serious aspersions on the integrity of its makers, distrib Walter Reade, the film industry as a whole, and exhibs who book the pic, as well as raising doubts about the future of the regional cinema movement.
      add
  13. enkephalin
    • 1988 July 29, Laurence Gonzales, “When Doctors Are Addicts”, Chicago Reader:
      Doctors today can trace physical addiction to a location in the hypothalamic instinctual center in the brain and even explain that it results from a chemical imbalance within the body's own pain-mediating system--"a biochemical defect in the hypothalamic instinctual control center in the endorphin and enkephalin systems," wrote Talbott.
      add
  14. exhibs
    • 1988 July 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Female Trouble”, Chicago Reader:
      After Walter Reade finally picked up the film for distribution, Variety's reviewer wrote, "This film casts serious aspersions on the integrity of its makers, distrib Walter Reade, the film industry as a whole, and exhibs who book the pic, as well as raising doubts about the future of the regional cinema movement.
      add
  15. fluorspar
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      The typical Chicagoan probably goes for days without thinking about fluorspar, even though it is Illinois' official state mineral.
      add
  16. flyways
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      The number of mallard ducks that sojourn along the Mississippi and Illinois flyways has declined to record lows because of habitat degradation; populations of lesser scaups also are down.
      add
  17. garagey
    • 1988 July 29, Franklin Soults, “Royal Crescent Mob”, Chicago Reader:
      The Royal Crescent Mob are three sleazy white guys and a black drummer from Columbus, Ohio; instead of playing funked-up heavy metal, they play garagey, metal-tinged funk.
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  18. guises
    • 1988 July 29, Dennis Polkow, “Beethoven, Brahms, BBQ Sauce”, Chicago Reader:
      But the combination provided a fascinating glimpse at what is possible when Chicago's "other" professional orchestra has solid musical direction--something it rarely gets even in its various other guises, as the Lyric Opera in the fall and as the Orchestra of Illinois in the winter.
      add
  19. huntable
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      The habitat destruction that has imperiled huntable and fishable wildlife has pushed the Natural History Survey in the same direction, as have such potential hazards to cash crops as acid rain.
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  20. marathoning
    • 1988 July 29, Lawrence Rand, “Body Work: training for the triathlon”, Chicago Reader:
      Farrell, whose repertoire includes "Reason to Run" and "Jogging With Jesus," the latter a favorite on WFMT's Midnight Special, says that compared to marathoning, the triathlon "is a breeze--just because of the variety of the training and in the race itself.
      add
  21. mercurochrome
    • 1988 July 29, Laurence Gonzales, “When Doctors Are Addicts”, Chicago Reader:
      Alcohol is the base of both iodine and mercurochrome as an antiseptic.
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  22. middleclass
  23. minable
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      The research mandate of the state's three scientific surveys, founded in the 19th century, has always been as much economic as ecological--mapping minable coal reserves, for example, or studying crop diseases.
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  24. misperceived
    • 1988 July 29, Laurence Gonzales, “When Doctors Are Addicts”, Chicago Reader:
      Many of those doctors sought professional help for their problems, but they misperceived their problems as depression, mid-life crisis, or something other than addiction.
      add
  25. necrophagic
    • 1988 July 29, Lawrence Bommer, “Sex and Death in Chile”, Chicago Reader:
      When they're not needling each other about what each one's dead suitor called the other sister ("necrophagic" is one of the more telling epithets), Llalla and Lina fuss and fawn over Juan, ask him to admire their pointless wedding gowns, and whenever Adela leaves the room, separately seek to seduce him.
      add
  26. nonagricultural
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      Nor are nonagricultural plants described, except in passing, even though many such species are disappearing.
      add
  27. nongame
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      Several species of nongame fish have been extirpated in Illinois primarily because of siltation from eroding farm fields; another 21 are threatened.
      add
  28. nonpeer
    • 1988 July 29, Laurence Gonzales, “When Doctors Are Addicts”, Chicago Reader:
      During that time a number of goals are accomplished: detoxification and stabilization, if necessary; education about PAD; introduction to group therapy and AA groups, including a weekly peer group (other doctors) as well as a nonpeer group.
      add
  29. nonphysician
    • 1988 July 29, Laurence Gonzales, “When Doctors Are Addicts”, Chicago Reader:
      This is different from the way nonphysician addicts get help.
      add
  30. nonplant
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      There is no real mention of insects--not even the corn rootworm or gypsy moth, both much studied because of the damage they inflict on field and forest--even though insects comprise by far the largest class of nonplant species among Illinois' living things.
      add
  31. nonpros
    • 1988 July 29, Lawrence Rand, “Body Work: training for the triathlon”, Chicago Reader:
      The equipment gets a lot of use--even nonpros like Farrell and Houle train three hours a day, six days a week.
      add
  32. nonvertebrate
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      But approximately 50 plant and animal species indigenous to the state are known to have been extirpated; the number of nonvertebrate species that have vanished will never be known.
      add
  33. oneshot
    • 1988 July 29, Kyle Gann, “Music Notes: a pianist who gets her body into it”, Chicago Reader:
      I got the idea of together a program--just as a oneshot deal--of music by Western composers who'd been influenced by Asian aesthetics, beginning with Debussy.
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  34. poignance
    • 1988 July 29, Albert Williams, “Sea Marks; The Wizard of A.I.D.S.”, Chicago Reader:
      By setting the action in the 1920s, by bringing the action so close to (sometimes into) the audience, and by playing for subtley rather than bathos, Forster explores instead the quirks of the characters' interaction; from the start, the weird sense of distance that the actors convey even in their closest moments suggests the affair isn't going to work out, so those moments gain an edge of poignance that catches our attention.
      add
  35. postglacial
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      Rain is why Illinois doesn't look like Kansas: thousands of years of erosion have carved the state's once-flat postglacial terrain into its current distinctive rolling shape.
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  36. postvideo
    • 1988 July 29, Anthony Adler, “Carnival Shoes”, Chicago Reader:
      Like everything else I've seen by Tirabassi and her director/husband, Christopher Peditto, Carnival Shoes is a visual hoot: a further example of their gorgeous, playful, make-do theater, their postvideo poor theater, with its combination of homemade funk and show-biz smarts.
      add
  37. prophylacticated
  38. punker
    • 1988 July 29, Diana Spinrad, “Burnin' With the 8 Ball”, Chicago Reader:
      And famous punker Joe Strummer figures prominently in Mercury's life.
      add
  39. rootworm
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      There is no real mention of insects--not even the corn rootworm or gypsy moth, both much studied because of the damage they inflict on field and forest--even though insects comprise by far the largest class of nonplant species among Illinois' living things.
      add
  40. salsalike
  41. scaups
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      The number of mallard ducks that sojourn along the Mississippi and Illinois flyways has declined to record lows because of habitat degradation; populations of lesser scaups also are down.
      add
  42. siltation
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      Several species of nongame fish have been extirpated in Illinois primarily because of siltation from eroding farm fields; another 21 are threatened.
      add
  43. spiralbound
    • 1988 July 29, James Krohe Jr., “Reading: Nature in a Sorry State”, Chicago Reader:
      Their book is a handsome physical production, reliably spiralbound and printed on sturdy stock, with an especially clever foldout map of Illinois counties.
      add
  44. stylization
    • 1988 July 29, Diana Spinrad, “Burnin' With the 8 Ball”, Chicago Reader:
      Visual images and vocal stylization overwhelm the words, when the words are the meat and potatoes of Burnin' With the 8 Ball.
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  45. styrofoam
    • 1988 July 29, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      Convinced of the reality of the styrofoam menace, I made a few inquiries.
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  46. tunelet
    • 1988 July 29, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      A hook can be almost anything, e.g, a "riff," some catchy instrumental tunelet, such as the bass line in the Rolling Stones' "Satisfaction.
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  47. ultratraditional
    • 1988 July 29, Kyle Gann, “Music Notes: a pianist who gets her body into it”, Chicago Reader:
      Born in 1947, self-taught, and from ultratraditional Japanese background, Satoh writes shimmering, ecstatically minimalist music full of tremolos and delicate melodies.
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  48. unhilly
  49. unreleasable
    • 1988 July 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Female Trouble”, Chicago Reader:
      In 1968, Columbia Pictures deemed the black-and-white Night of the Living Dead unreleasable, and American International Pictures agreed to distribute the film only if Romero would add a new, upbeat ending (which he refused to do).
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  50. untrampled
  51. visionless
    • 1988 July 29, Dennis Polkow, “Beethoven, Brahms, BBQ Sauce”, Chicago Reader:
      Conductor George Cleve is a prime example of a bizarre but all too common irony in the music world: for every visionless conductor with an overblown international reputation, there is somewhere a George Cleve, a multitalented, first-rate, can-do-it-all conductor who remains largely unknown to the public.
      add

Sequestered[edit]