User:Visviva/Reader 19880819

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-08-19 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-17).

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36696 tokens ‧ 27583 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5293 types ‧ 33 (~ 0.623%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-08-19[edit]

  1. arcadia
    • 1988 August 19, Christopher Hill, “Blue August”, Chicago Reader:
      Paradise had only just left America, and it lingered in the summer like the arcadia of an ornate whitewashed bandstand under the dark enameled leaves in the park.
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  2. borings
    • 1988 August 19, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      MSD contractors will place more than two million cubic yards of Deep Tunnel limestone borings on the wide-open spaces of the Miller Meadow forest preserve just west of Forest Park, between Roosevelt and Cermak.
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  3. businesswise
    • 1988 August 19, Grant Pick, “Where the Action Isn't”, Chicago Reader:
      "It was a good time, businesswise," she remembers.
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  4. cutups
  5. dustcloth
    • 1988 August 19, Tom Valeo, “The Other Cinderella”, Chicago Reader:
      Wearing a housecoat and a turban, she putters around with a dustcloth until Fairygodmomma arrives and arranges for her to be taken to the ball in a stretch limo "driven by Billy Dee Williams.
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  6. fixedness
    • 1988 August 19, Ted Cox, “Reading: The Poetry of Baseball”, Chicago Reader:
      Because statistics, after all, do not move; they are rather bland, and their very fixedness allows them to be manipulated for ignorant if not evil ends (the sort of mishandling James is referring to--someone cites a player as a clutch, "late-inning pressure" player because he has a .333 batting average under these tightly defined circumstances, when in fact the circumstances are so tightly defined that the player has only a hit in three chances).
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  7. garagey
    • 1988 August 19, Franklin Soults, “Barbie Army”, Chicago Reader:
      For one thing, their musical wardrobe contains some pretty standard underground styles: folkie Nuggets-era pop, a bit of early 70s glitter rock, some cowpoke country here and doom 'n' gloom punk there, typical garagey stuff like that.
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  8. hennaed
    • 1988 August 19, Grant Pick, “Where the Action Isn't”, Chicago Reader:
      Lambert's hair is sometimes red, sometimes not, but nowadays it is hennaed and often pinned back with a mother-of-pearl comb.
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  9. homerun
    • 1988 August 19, Ted Cox, “Reading: The Poetry of Baseball”, Chicago Reader:
      That, however, is also part of the Encyclopedia's charm: that its numbers are set in stone, and that it is decades and sometimes more decades before Babe Ruth's homerun total (the "714" of our poem) makes way for Hank Aaron's 755, or before Ty Cobb's 4,191 hits make way for Pete Rose's 4,256 (a number now making its first appearance in a baseball encyclopedia).
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  10. mafioso
    • 1988 August 19, Neil Elliot, “Copping Out”, Chicago Reader:
      Ask any FBI man who's ever tried to harass a mafioso.
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  11. miniessays
    • 1988 August 19, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Cane Toads: An Unnatural History/Films by Jane Campion”, Chicago Reader:
      (The strange mating habits of cane toads are described in detail; their poison has not only caused ecological disaster in the area, but also has served as an illegal hallucinogenic drug; many children treat the toads as pets; and so on.) On the same program, and much more interesting as filmmaking, are three highly original independent shorts by New Zealand filmmaker Jane Campion, all of them made while she was attending the Australian Film and Television School: Peel (1981) and A Girl's Own Story (1984) are about family quarrels and transgressions; the remarkable Passionless Moments (1984), made with Gerard Lee, is a series of fictional miniessays that defy description.
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  12. multiunit
    • 1988 August 19, Grant Pick, “Where the Action Isn't”, Chicago Reader:
      And these brokers' sales of houses and multiunit buildings overall seem to indicate a heartening though tiny upswing for a marginal section of the city.
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  13. narcissistically
    • 1988 August 19, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Self-Portraits”, Chicago Reader:
      The challenge of the story, in short, isn't merely that Jesus is tempted by human frailty, but that the audience is asked to identify with this same conflict, masochistically as well as narcissistically.
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  14. nondefense
  15. poignance
    • 1988 August 19, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      Too bad Locke's idea didn't catch on; the thought of measuring things in philosophical feet has an unquestionable poignance.
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  16. postrock
    • 1988 August 19, David Whiteis, “The blues and Moore”, Chicago Reader:
      His playing on a song like this evokes the Delta tradition even as it burns and screams its testimony to the postrock necessities of 80s blues.
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  17. prequalifies
    • 1988 August 19, Grant Pick, “Where the Action Isn't”, Chicago Reader:
      As soon as the prospective buyer "prequalifies" to Ken's satisfaction (and all but four or five a year do, Jerline reports), the next step usually is to find a financial institution to back the transaction.
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  18. sabremetrician
    • 1988 August 19, Ted Cox, “Reading: The Poetry of Baseball”, Chicago Reader:
      In his final essay, "Breaking the Wand," James swears off his own "sabremetrician" label and vows to stop doing the Abstract.
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  19. selftaught
    • 1988 August 19, David Whiteis, “The blues and Moore”, Chicago Reader:
      Moore has an instinctive harmonic sense far beyond that of most selftaught musicians, hinting at an underlying jazz sensibility that he continues to develop as his music evolves.
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  20. serifed
    • 1988 August 19, Ted Cox, “Reading: The Poetry of Baseball”, Chicago Reader:
      In its truncated curves, its rounded, open form, it seems to say so much more than "three," especially when I imagine it in one of those ancient serifed typefaces, in the corner of a page in an old edition of Leaves of Grass, instead of in its glowing, acned form on my computer screen.
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  21. sharecropped
    • 1988 August 19, Grant Pick, “Where the Action Isn't”, Chicago Reader:
      When her older children were still young, Jerline took to working the cotton fields of the spread her father-in-law sharecropped, and then of the small plantation her own father owned.
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  22. steellike
    • 1988 August 19, David Whiteis, “The blues and Moore”, Chicago Reader:
      Over it all soars the guitar mastery of Moore, whose lines shimmer with a steellike hardness despite a playful melodic imagination and a sly sense of fun.
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  23. upperdeck
    • 1988 August 19, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      This was no more the end of day baseball than it was when they first put the lights atop the upperdeck roof, but at the same time I don't think anyone would be cantankerous enough to say that things haven't changed at Wrigley Field and in baseball and in our culture in general.
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  24. whizbangs
    • 1988 August 19, Kitry Krause, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      If you want to find out what kind of hardware or software you should--or shouldn't--buy, come pick the brains of some real computer whizbangs at CACHEfest '88, the 12th annual flea market and swap fest of the Chicago Area Computer Hobbyists Exchange.
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Sequestered[edit]