User:Visviva/Reader 19880909

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-09-09 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-19).

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41834 tokens ‧ 32245 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5565 types ‧ 43 (~ 0.773%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-09-09[edit]

  1. adversarially
    • 1988 September 9, John Schultz, “The Siege of '68”, Chicago Reader:
      A historian should be very cautious in relying upon the adversarially pressured testimony of the conspiracy trial in regard to the facts bearing upon convention week.
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  2. anthro
    • 1988 September 9, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      I gather the phrase is used in lieu of some more practical benefit, e. g. , a "job," which, as holders of English lit and anthro degrees can tell you, isn't necessarily part of the program.
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  3. bellowings
    • 1988 September 9, M. Gustaf, “Silence Is Upscale”, Chicago Reader:
      Come to think of it, we lived with the same situation on Olive St. So putting the little pieces together, including all the bits told by discouraged friends, I realized this is no small potatoes problem: not if home means more than a place to slink in and out of, or more than a place where the noises that even seep through closed windows are the mean and threatening human bellowings that one associates, at best, with 'C' movies.
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  4. blazingly
    • 1988 September 9, John Schultz, “The Siege of '68”, Chicago Reader:
      There was no way that the two officers in the car could not have seen the bizarre, blazingly lit scene before them.
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  5. coeditor
    • 1988 September 9, John Schultz, “The Siege of '68”, Chicago Reader:
      Stewart Albert (unindicted coconspirator in the conspiracy trial and coeditor with Judith Albert of The Sixties Papers) has examined this host of FBI memoranda and has found reports of assassination "schemes.
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  6. comanaging
    • 1988 September 9, Justin Hayford, “Opening Nights: making the world safe for performance art”, Chicago Reader:
      Her years of legwork made her see how badly a facility like Live Bait was needed, and the theater has been a cooperative--almost a family--endeavor: Evanss husband, John Ragir, is executive producer, and her sister, Catherine Evans, is comanaging director, along with Curt Columbus.
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  7. craftsmanly
    • 1988 September 9, David Whiteis, “Stuff enough: Raful Neal and the bluesman's dilemma”, Chicago Reader:
      It was the exhilaration of moments like this that made the audience somewhat restless during the band's long warm-up sets later in the evening, sets primarily made up of craftsmanly but unimaginative reworkings of contemporary pop-funk.
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  8. crosshanded
    • 1988 September 9, Dennis Polkow, “Lower Standards”, Chicago Reader:
      This was an excellent choice, given that the pounding rhythms and crosshanded clusters were adequately perceptible despite the instrument's tuning problems.
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  9. ensembled
    • 1988 September 9, Dennis Polkow, “Lower Standards”, Chicago Reader:
      Macal's "Promenade" opening was slow and unbalanced; the "Gnomus" section was stodgy and poorly ensembled.
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  10. fireless
    • 1988 September 9, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      If you want to attack that conclusion, your best evidence is the string of fireless years from 1982 through 1987.
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  11. fireweed
    • 1988 September 9, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      Moose love fireweed, a plant that appears in huge numbers on fresh burns and declines sharply within a decade.
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  12. guitarlike
    • 1988 September 9, David Whiteis, “Stuff enough: Raful Neal and the bluesman's dilemma”, Chicago Reader:
      Neal's performance at Rosa's in large part confirmed the impression given on his LP. His harmonica work has the breezy lightness and sensuality one would expect from a musician who spent several years with Slim Harpo, but he's also capable of a full-bodied tone, bending notes with a guitarlike intensity and demonstrating a keen improvisational imagination behind his relatively sparse style.
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  13. humbuggery
    • 1988 September 9, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      The phrase is redolent of 19th-century humbuggery, but exactly where it originated is unknown.
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  14. imbecilities
    • 1988 September 9, Gary Houston, “Reading: If Mencken Could See Us Now”, Chicago Reader:
      Maybe that's Mencken's legacy--not very complex and not especially novel, but befogged enough by the anesthetics of life late in this century that we remain susceptible to the imbecilities Mencken fought in its earlier half.
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  15. inerts
  16. leftish
    • 1988 September 9, Gary Houston, “Reading: If Mencken Could See Us Now”, Chicago Reader:
      Mencken could distrust leftish movements and still defend La Follette against Red-baiting adversaries; he could still feel kindly toward Eugene Debs and, in 1948, call the Socialist party's perennial presidential hopeful, Norman Thomas, the best man running.
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  17. leukoencephalitis
  18. lodgepole
    • 1988 September 9, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      Most of Yellowstone's forests--and most of what is burning this year--are lodgepole pine woods.
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  19. mandragora
  20. megacorporations
  21. megatonnage
    • 1988 September 9, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      "We have grown accustomed to a deadly paradox: the world's greatest megatonnage of TNT is buried in the heart of the earth's most productive agricultural area.
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  22. minidomes
    • 1988 September 9, Bryan Miller, “Knells of Saint Mary's”, Chicago Reader:
      Holabird and Root wants to tear down the four watchacallums--the four minidomes.
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  23. mouthers
    • 1988 September 9, M. Gustaf, “Silence Is Upscale”, Chicago Reader:
      Power grabbers and cliche mouthers fill our magical screens--role models for the disenchanted of any age.
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  24. nonlove
  25. overspenders
    • 1988 September 9, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      "When people don't feel good about themselves, or something isn't right in their lives, they often buy things to feel better," says Joyce Weber, coordinator of Loop Family Center's overspenders support group.
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  26. preopening
  27. punkers
    • 1988 September 9, Greg Beaubien, “At the Entrance of the Exit”, Chicago Reader:
      There's no shortage of obnoxious punkers, but the sports fans who come to gawk at the freaks are usually the most obnoxious and belligerent.
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  28. reinvolvement
    • 1988 September 9, Bryan Miller, “Knells of Saint Mary's”, Chicago Reader:
      Jeffery points out that among his neighbors are several ex-Roman Catholics who are leaning toward reinvolvement in the Church--but not on the old "do as we tell you, unquestioningly" terms.
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  29. repairability
    • 1988 September 9, Bryan Miller, “Knells of Saint Mary's”, Chicago Reader:
      They concluded that the problems of the church were '20 percent repairability and 80 percent political.
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  30. reworkings
    • 1988 September 9, David Whiteis, “Stuff enough: Raful Neal and the bluesman's dilemma”, Chicago Reader:
      It was the exhilaration of moments like this that made the audience somewhat restless during the band's long warm-up sets later in the evening, sets primarily made up of craftsmanly but unimaginative reworkings of contemporary pop-funk.
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  31. shovings
    • 1988 September 9, John Schultz, “The Siege of '68”, Chicago Reader:
      From Roosevelt Road to Congress, National Guardsmen and police blocked the bridges over the IC tracks that led from Grant Park to Michigan Avenue and the Hilton Hotel, and used generally hostile urging, tear gas, clubbings, shovings, and beatings to drive the demonstrators northward.
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  32. smellers
    • 1988 September 9, Gary Houston, “Reading: If Mencken Could See Us Now”, Chicago Reader:
      He took a train to New York, where he prevailed upon censorious pals in the U. S. Post Office (Mencken liked to call such folk "smellers") to ban the issue from mail going to Boston.
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  33. smolderingly
    • 1988 September 9, David Whiteis, “Stuff enough: Raful Neal and the bluesman's dilemma”, Chicago Reader:
      His voice, although made to sound somewhat tinny by an inadequate amplification system on Friday evening, is expressive and gritty, exuberant on fast shuffles and smolderingly passionate on ballads.
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  34. surfacings
    • 1988 September 9, Gary Houston, “Reading: If Mencken Could See Us Now”, Chicago Reader:
      He promoted these many prejudices with an incomparable consistency over his lifetime (1880-1956); if you ventured to boil them down you might say he respected facts, hated all kinds of gaudiness, and scorned all surfacings of "the bilge of idealism.
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  35. tuckpointing
    • 1988 September 9, Bryan Miller, “Knells of Saint Mary's”, Chicago Reader:
      The other estimates included tuckpointing the entire structure.
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  36. underequipped
    • 1988 September 9, Justin Hayford, “Opening Nights: making the world safe for performance art”, Chicago Reader:
      In addition to providing a safe environment for the more adventurous theatergoer, Live Bait Theater will offer an artistic haven to Chicago performance artists, who have traditionally presented their work in one- or two-night engagements in out-of-the-way, underequipped spaces.
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  37. underrehearsed
    • 1988 September 9, Dennis Polkow, “Lower Standards”, Chicago Reader:
      It can be argued, as some local critics have done, that it's better to do something than nothing, but I am not sure that anyone is served--least of all the composer or the audience--when new scores are presented in a grossly underrehearsed manner.
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  38. unseriously
    • 1988 September 9, Gary Houston, “Reading: If Mencken Could See Us Now”, Chicago Reader:
      Most of us may still take "ideology" as unseriously, but fewer trust their gut feelings as confidently as Mencken trusted his.
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Sequestered[edit]