User:Visviva/Reader 19880916

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-09-16 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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39414 tokens ‧ 30572 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5803 types ‧ 39 (~ 0.672%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-09-16[edit]

  1. antidevelopment
  2. bansheelike
    • 1988 September 16, David Whiteis, “Rock's early raunch: Joe Houston saves the wails”, Chicago Reader:
      A veteran of the tough audiences on the black rhythm and blues circuit, Houston wastes no time noodling around on stage; he begins his show from the back of the club, screaming bansheelike saxophone war cries through a cordless microphone and slowly stalking through the crowd in the general direction of the bandstand.
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  3. codirectors
    • 1988 September 16, Anthony Adler, “The Age of the Plague”, Chicago Reader:
      That final diapers-on-barbed-wire image isn't original with this production or its codirectors, Rick Helweg and Jill Daly.
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  4. conductorless
    • 1988 September 16, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      The Concertante di Chicago, our town's conductorless chamber orchestra, will be sharing Purcell, Britten, Haydn, and Handel works this afternoon in their fall concert.
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  5. cowriter
    • 1988 September 16, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Not Coming Soon to a Theater Near You”, Chicago Reader:
      Director and cowriter Larry Cohen is widely regarded as one of the unsung heroes of low-budget genre filmmaking--there's a useful critical survey of his prolific output by Robin Wood in his book Hollywood From Vietnam to Reagan--but for reasons that elude me, not many of his efforts seem to have made it onto video.
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  6. feetfirst
    • 1988 September 16, Don Gold, “Straight From the Keeper's Mouth”, Chicago Reader:
      They kill the snake, they open him up, and their friend had been swallowed feetfirst.
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  7. gnostic
    • 1988 September 16, Robert McClory, “Heal Thy Neighbor”, Chicago Reader:
      Maggie (as she is usually called) says she is constantly amazed at Kast's "almost gnostic outlook" on life.
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  8. intercutting
    • 1988 September 16, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Not Coming Soon to a Theater Near You”, Chicago Reader:
      The film's opening adroitly charts, with intercutting, the separate lives of Gerald, a publisher, and Lucy Irvine (Amanda Donohue), an Inland Revenue clerk; Gerald is seen in a pub and with his young sons at home, Lucy on her way to work and with her female flatmate in their cramped apartment.
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  9. intrabird
    • 1988 September 16, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      But when scientists filmed geese in flight, they discovered that (1) the angle of the V varied all over the place, but was generally sharper than theoretical models predicted; (2) intrabird distance was also pretty hit and miss; and (3) the geese didn't flap their wings synchronously or in any discernible pattern.
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  10. lannon
    • 1988 September 16, Hank De Zutter, “Ed Lawrence's neighborhood: a downtown tour”, Chicago Reader:
      "Until ten years ago or so, Wieboldt's had a beautiful terra-cotta exterior that for some reason was torn out to make way for this ugly aluminum and lannon stone.
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  11. lyin
    • 1988 September 16, Adam Langer and Paul Creamer, “Puss 'n Booths”, Chicago Reader:
      The woman begins to remove her brassiere as Stevie Wonder sings "What did your mama tell you 'bout lyin?
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  12. malling
    • 1988 September 16, Hank De Zutter, “Ed Lawrence's neighborhood: a downtown tour”, Chicago Reader:
      To Lawrence the "malling" of State Street has been more like a mauling, so he is delighted that the city and property owners want to change it.
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  13. metallically
    • 1988 September 16, Tom Boeker, “Hughie; Before Breakfast”, Chicago Reader:
      It cleaves metallically to the roof of your mouth.
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  14. nightclubby
    • 1988 September 16, David Whiteis, “Rock's early raunch: Joe Houston saves the wails”, Chicago Reader:
      Likewise, the R and B standard "Night Train"--originally the Ellington number "Happy-Go-Lucky Local" composed by Ellington and Jimmy Forrest, not by Houston as he claimed on Friday--was given the full Houston treatment: droning phrases interspersed with honking, spasmodic note clusters laid over the nightclubby backing of the Chicago musicians behind him.
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  15. nonproficient
    • 1988 September 16, Bill Wyman, “60 Seconds in the Limelight”, Chicago Reader:
      As for the nonproficient ones, the effect was that of a Model T being driven by a beginner: all fits and starts, with real disaster just around the comer.
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  16. plaguelike
    • 1988 September 16, Anthony Adler, “The Age of the Plague”, Chicago Reader:
      Last season alone, the Goodman Theatre mounted Peter Barnes's Red Noses, Northlight ran Karel Capek's The White Plague, and the Organic offered Maria Irene Fornes's The Danube--the first two being moral and political fables built around an outbreak of plague; the last, a moral and political sharp poke in the eye built around the plaguelike effects of a nuclear catastrophe.
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  17. popster
    • 1988 September 16, Bill Wyman, “60 Seconds in the Limelight”, Chicago Reader:
      He added that he also liked the melodic work of pure popster Todd Rundgren.
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  18. popularizer
    • 1988 September 16, Pamela Little De Zutter, “Art Facts: and now, poetry videos”, Chicago Reader:
      Okita, an avowed popularizer who once read a poem to the accompaniment of Stevie Wonder music, even has a kind word for Rod McKuen.
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  19. postrock
    • 1988 September 16, David Whiteis, “Rock's early raunch: Joe Houston saves the wails”, Chicago Reader:
      Despite moments of missed musical communication between Joe and the band, and in the face of a faltering sound system that forced him to both play and sing through the same cordless microphone much of the time, Houston unleased an exuberant, uninhibited spirit that one encounters all too seldom in this era of self-consciously rude, prefabricated postrock rebels.
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  20. predijucated
  21. prereadied
    • 1988 September 16, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      --but neither were his answers simple or prereadied.
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  22. sassiness
    • 1988 September 16, David Whiteis, “Rock's early raunch: Joe Houston saves the wails”, Chicago Reader:
      He needs a fat horn section with balls enough to kick him in the ass when he yakkety-yaks them; the comparatively laid-back Chicago blues backing wasn't always appropriate to his sassiness and occasional rhythmic unpredictability.
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  23. semifeminist
    • 1988 September 16, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Not Coming Soon to a Theater Near You”, Chicago Reader:
      No such claims can be made for the likable but modest Assault of the Killer Bimbos, a first feature and low-budget exploitation item whose chief virtues are its unflagging cheerfulness and its unpretentious efforts to express some semifeminist attitudes in a genre of filmmaking where they're hardly expected.
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  24. semimindless
    • 1988 September 16, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Not Coming Soon to a Theater Near You”, Chicago Reader:
      Part of my affection for this little movie is its revival of the kind of good-natured, semimindless romp that was much more common in the 60s and 70s, usually on the bottom half of double-bills at drive-ins.
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  25. semitortured
    • 1988 September 16, Diana Spinrad, “Oh My . . . Nuts! A Musical Tribute to the Late Great Mark Nutter”, Chicago Reader:
      One of the cleverest--and most instructive for the uninitiated--bits is from a fictitious play called Shut Up and Listen, a play in which nobody talks but the semitortured artist character that Nutter wrote for himself.
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  26. shovelers
    • 1988 September 16, Robert McClory, “Heal Thy Neighbor”, Chicago Reader:
      He stirred a ruckus at his school by speaking out for improved benefits for the low-paid snow shovelers and maintenance men.
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  27. toughed
    • 1988 September 16, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      He lacked his good stuff, yet toughed it out like a veritable Sutcliffe, confounding the Phillies by mixing a liberal number of breaking pitches in with his fastball.
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  28. tufty
    • 1988 September 16, Bill Wyman, “60 Seconds in the Limelight”, Chicago Reader:
      Ray was 21 and from Berwyn, had a clear, angelic complexion and sported a tufty head of black hair that made him look a little like Steven Tyler of Aerosmith.
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  29. unenthusiastically
    • 1988 September 16, Adam Langer and Paul Creamer, “Puss 'n Booths”, Chicago Reader:
      A small screen over a window slides up as your token is registered, and you see a naked woman--in this case, a tall blond with short hair--gyrating unenthusiastically in front of your window on a makeshift stage.
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  30. unsat
    • 1988 September 16, Hank De Zutter, “Ed Lawrence's neighborhood: a downtown tour”, Chicago Reader:
      We head east on Madison and Lawrence points out--inconspicuous, unheralded, and at the moment unsat upon--downtown's only benches with backs.
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Sequestered[edit]

  1. gwiisssh - nonce onomatopoeia
    • 1988 September 16, Don Gold, “Straight From the Keeper's Mouth”, Chicago Reader:
      As they kept coming closer and closer, each time he'd let them get closer and closer, and then all of a sudden he'd take his paw and go gwiisssh.
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