User:Visviva/Reader 19880923

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-09-23 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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41085 tokens ‧ 31236 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5946 types ‧ 38 (~ 0.639%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-09-23[edit]

  1. antireligion
    • 1988 September 23, Hugh Boulware, “On Stage: all things crass and kitschy”, Chicago Reader:
      Lloyd's Prayer includes several ingeniously loopy spiels from Lloyd in his carnival huckster-televangelist modes, but Kling insists he's not antireligion.
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  2. archcapitalistic
  3. clocklike
    • 1988 September 23, Roger B. Moore, “Ramones/Iggy Pop”, Chicago Reader:
      Too old and crotchety to be a character in his own band's songs, yet too nimble and smart to take his "Golden Boys of Punk" tour to Vegas, Joey Ramone regenerates his myth by taking his gang of lovably unchanging street geeks through the same old motions with such clocklike regularity that teen rebellion fantasies become as instinctive, and as necessary, as breathing.
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  4. copresidents
    • 1988 September 23, Harold Henderson, “A Piece of Lakefront”, Chicago Reader:
      Public good nothing, replied the copresidents of the League of Women Voters of Chicago.
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  5. dustheap
    • 1988 September 23, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      Cannibalism may yet join witchcraft on the dustheap of history.
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  6. faves
    • 1988 September 23, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      The nearly two-year-old club has a library of more than 750 cartoons, including faves such as Felix the Cat, Bugs Bunny, and Daffy Duck.
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  7. gospely
    • 1988 September 23, Bill Wyman, “The world's most advanced rock star”, Chicago Reader:
      He turns R & B ribaldry into a polymorphously perverse 80s salaciousness; whatever gospely religiosity remains imbedded in his soul he has recreated into a sometimes sincere ("The Cross") but nonetheless suspicious amalgam of sex, love, death, masturbation, incest, wishful transsexuality, and voyeurism.
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  8. gumshoeing
    • 1988 September 23, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      " But these days, more and more women are gumshoeing through the pages of murder mysteries.
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  9. housepainter
    • 1988 September 23, Lawrence Bommer, “The First Annual Showcase of New Plays”, Chicago Reader:
      A housepainter (Doreen Dawson) arrives in 60s garb (she misread the casting call, which was for people under 60).
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  10. hyperreal
    • 1988 September 23, O.F. Chtiguel, “That Wasn't Garbage, It Was Postmodernism”, Chicago Reader:
      Thus, the aspect of real and unreal, real and hyperreal, is crucial to a number of artists and writers such as Baudrillard and Echo.
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  11. insectlike
    • 1988 September 23, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      This time of year, especially when the wind is from the north, the sounds that break the comparative silence are dry, almost insectlike chipping noises emanating from high overhead.
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  12. interruptus
    • 1988 September 23, Walter Tegtmeyer, “Tribune Power”, Chicago Reader:
      26) the Sun-Times's Dennis (The Blasphemer) Byrne was responsible for an interruptus in the collective, multiple orgasms the media were having during the festival of lights at Wrigley Field.
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  13. lakefill
    • 1988 September 23, Harold Henderson, “A Piece of Lakefront”, Chicago Reader:
      On a purely physical and aesthetic level, Loyola's Loyola's lakefront will be an incomparably nicer place after the lakefill than it is now.
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  14. landlessness
    • 1988 September 23, Anthony Adler, “Big Budget”, Chicago Reader:
      Especially not in this case, the story in this case being The Grapes of Wrath--John Steinbeck's tale of the Joad family, landless and desperate, making its way from Oklahoma to California during the dust-bowl calamity of the 1930s, hoping for a new start but finding only a more permanent landlessness and a greater despair.
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  15. leasable
  16. nonnarrative
    • 1988 September 23, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Entertainment as Oppression”, Chicago Reader:
      As long as there's no apparent threat that anything "serious" is being attempted, a filmmaker is free to do anything at all--in this case, put together a film that is little more than a nonnarrative string of dreams.
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  17. nonserious
    • 1988 September 23, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Entertainment as Oppression”, Chicago Reader:
      " According to the press materials, it "establishes a new genre in the tradition of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood"--a good example of a work that combines (or confuses) serious and nonserious categories in order to offer something for everyone (as they used to say in the 60s, different strokes for different folks).
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  18. poetics
    • 1988 September 23, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Entertainment as Oppression”, Chicago Reader:
      Reaching for poetics to justify this obfuscation is understandable but dangerous.
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  19. progay
    • 1988 September 23, Achy Obejas, “Homophobia”, Chicago Reader:
      Laurie Dittman and Rick Garcia, the two activists primarily responsible for producing credible and varied progay testimony, had lined up an impressive list: the Reverend Willie Barrow of Operation PUSH; writer Anne Mueller; Donna Quinn of Chicago Catholic Women, former president of the National Coalition of American Nuns; Dick Simpson of Clergy and Laity Concerned; the Community Renewal Society's Paul Sherry; Larry Gorski, president of the Network of Illinois Voters With Disabilities; Tom Bensinger from Access Living Services; and many others.
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  20. reinterpretive
    • 1988 September 23, Bill Wyman, “The world's most advanced rock star”, Chicago Reader:
      Prince's drama and his Muse--and his success--are based on this forward, reinterpretive movement; by contrast, all others, including Jackson, are about the past.
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  21. retailoring
    • 1988 September 23, Harold Henderson, “A Piece of Lakefront”, Chicago Reader:
      The doctrine itself came over on the Mayflower, but it got its first substantial retailoring under U. S. law courtesy of a brouhaha over Chicago's very own lakefront.
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  22. spectacularity
    • 1988 September 23, O.F. Chtiguel, “That Wasn't Garbage, It Was Postmodernism”, Chicago Reader:
      This life of the late 20th century is itself so spectacular that, quite naturally, the creators of Alagazam have turned their attention to the origins of this spectacularity.
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  23. squadrol
    • 1988 September 23, Abe Peck, “'68 Sources”, Chicago Reader:
      My story--hippie-rad editor turned journalism professor--and Michael's--he rocked a squadrol on Michigan Avenue, now he owns a business in Rogers Park--are typical enough to merit coverage.
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  24. undersamples
    • 1988 September 23, Jerry Sullivan, “Field & Street”, Chicago Reader:
      Because this method misses a lot of birds--it undersamples places that aren't near roads--it can't be used to estimate total populations.
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  25. unpatterned
    • 1988 September 23, Bill Wyman, “The world's most advanced rock star”, Chicago Reader:
      His records are at once scary tours through the unpatterned windmills of his dark mind and calculated, deadly assassinations of his real and imagined predecessors, from James Brown ("Kiss") to Joni Mitchell ("Dorothy Parker"), from Sly Stone ("Slow Love") to Fleetwood Mac ("I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man").
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  26. unplayed
    • 1988 September 23, Bill Wyman, “The world's most advanced rock star”, Chicago Reader:
      Lovesexy is a strange album even by Prince standards; aside from a fun but throwaway hit, "Alphabet St" (unplayed Saturday), it strikes me as unfriendly and nearly impenetrable.
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  27. untherapeutic
    • 1988 September 23, Tom Kara, “What Dogs Do”, Chicago Reader:
      The psychiatrist's assertion that it would be "untherapeutic" to keep dogs out of parks indicates pretty well the self-centered view of owners who don't seem to care that playful, unleashed dogs can be a danger to children, bicyclists and others, including park wildlife; that not everybody feels so casually about stepping in dog shit and not realizing it until the rugs at home smell; and that many people are very afraid of the large breeds which people use for bodyguard purposes.
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  28. utopianism
    • 1988 September 23, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Entertainment as Oppression”, Chicago Reader:
      As Richard Dyer points out in his essay "Entertainment and Utopia," "Two of the taken-for-granted descriptions of entertainment, as 'escape' and as 'wish-fulfillment,' point to its central thrust, namely, utopianism.
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Sequestered[edit]