User:Visviva/Reader 19880930

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-09-30 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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35044 tokens ‧ 27235 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 5452 types ‧ 39 (~ 0.715%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-09-30[edit]

  1. buzzy
    • 1988 September 30, Dennis Polkow, “The Bach Way”, Chicago Reader:
      Banks's cello playing, especially in solo passages, was barely audible within the ensemble's overall texture and seemed to have a rather buzzy timbre to it when it could be heard--perhaps because she was directing and playing at the same time, This is an "authentic" practice in the sense that music was performed in this manner in Bach's day (although Bach led from the viola).
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  2. choirly
    • 1988 September 30, Lawrence Bommer, “On Stage: Romeo and Juliet in Little Italy”, Chicago Reader:
      " Toward that end he composed a love theme, a death march, and some "choirly" music to be connected with Friar Lawrence.
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  3. copyboy
    • 1988 September 30, Robert Heuer, “Free Lunch”, Chicago Reader:
      "I have no knowledge of that," said sportswriter Bill Gleason, whose newspaper career began in 1942 as a Chicago Sun copyboy.
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  4. disinforms
    • 1988 September 30, Tom Boeker, “Doctor Faustus”, Chicago Reader:
      I especially enjoyed the temptation scenes and (in the light of modern science) the scene when Mephistophilis disinforms Faustus on the subject of astronomy.
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  5. dramaturgical
    • 1988 September 30, Anthony Adler, “Lloyd's Prayer”, Chicago Reader:
      Lloyd's Prayer was developed at Robert Redford's Sundance Institute, where you'd expect it to have gotten a good dramaturgical going-over.
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  6. ensembling
    • 1988 September 30, Dennis Polkow, “Soaring Soprano”, Chicago Reader:
      During the overture, some poor string ensembling made for a fuzzy start, but in general conductor Donato Renzetti kept tight control and balance.
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  7. fouettes
    • 1988 September 30, Cerinda Survant, “Truly New”, Chicago Reader:
      They set her down, and when she erupts in fouettes, they can do nothing but look at each other, at us, shrug, and join in.
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  8. gnasher
    • 1988 September 30, Tom Boeker, “Doctor Faustus”, Chicago Reader:
      The other side Cox portrays is the gnasher of teeth, the damned soul meeting his ultimate deadline.
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  9. homoeroticism
    • 1988 September 30, Cerinda Survant, “Truly New”, Chicago Reader:
      Masculine images in the ballet tend toward one of two poles: the homoeroticism of contemporary European choreographers like Christopher Bruce and Jiri Kylian, and the men-drained-of-maleness we often see in Cunningham's dances.
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  10. ignobility
    • 1988 September 30, Henry Sheehan, “The White Woman's Burden”, Chicago Reader:
      The film also leaves little doubt as to the ignobility of those who would hunt the gorillas down.
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  11. mafiosi
    • 1988 September 30, Lawrence Bommer, “On Stage: Romeo and Juliet in Little Italy”, Chicago Reader:
      Accompanied by his bodyguard, the Prince/Don appears as a dignified politico (not to be confused with Black Hand extortionists or with mafiosi).
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  12. museumgoers
    • 1988 September 30, Holly Greenhagen, “Stitches in Time”, Chicago Reader:
      Hers is an obscure profession; museumgoers are seldom aware of the extent to which the pieces of clothing in exhibits have been examined or of the knowledge and care that goes into mending and cleaning them--or consciously leaving them unmended or uncleaned.
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  13. overwound
    • 1988 September 30, Anthony Adler, “Lloyd's Prayer”, Chicago Reader:
      O'Hare's got that great raccoon tick sound, like an overwound egg timer or a squirrel on a wire.
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  14. ownerbuilt
    • 1988 September 30, Joseph Bute Jr., “Days of Daley”, Chicago Reader:
      Innovations in the form of nonprofit incubators, ownerbuilt housing, energy conservation, recycling ventures, equity funds and information systems abound now after ten years of hard, difficult work by many of the organizations the Tribune and McCarron attack.
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  15. preplayoff
    • 1988 September 30, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      The Summer Games bled over from summer to fall this year, and to complete the transition we'll offer a little preplayoff analysis on the upcoming autumn classic, the World Series.
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  16. pressrooms
    • 1988 September 30, Robert Heuer, “Free Lunch”, Chicago Reader:
      "Many pressrooms don't have salad bars.
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  17. rockumentary
    • 1988 September 30, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      Charlie Is My Darling, a rockumentary of the Stones' 1965 tour of Ireland, refuted the early breakup stories and poked a little fun at Watts.
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  18. scampy
    • 1988 September 30, Henry Sheehan, “The White Woman's Burden”, Chicago Reader:
      Thanks to his association with Fossey, Sembagare rises in life from scampy village tour guide to responsible adjutant.
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  19. simpiest
    • 1988 September 30, Anthony Adler, “Lloyd's Prayer”, Chicago Reader:
      Written by Kevin Kling and first performed at Louisville's Humana Festival, where all of America's simpiest plays seem to get their start, Lloyd's Prayer is unrelentingly adorable in an implacably zany way.
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  20. superambitious
    • 1988 September 30, Franklin Soults, “Tom Verlaine”, Chicago Reader:
      Back in the late 70s, Verlaine was the renowned leader of the seminal new wave band Television, a group that miraculously revitalized the tired old idea of "guitar rock" by combining intricate, extended, and superambitious song structures with the simple rhythmic thrust, stark presentation, and defiant attitude that gave new wave and punk their startling jolt.
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  21. unassociated
  22. undermarked
    • 1988 September 30, Bryan Miller, “Cheap Eats: chili chefs get warm reception”, Chicago Reader:
      All their cooking is done at the restaurant, a woefully undermarked storefront with seats for 20 and a decidedly eclectic decor a few doors west of Austin Boulevard.
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  23. unmended
    • 1988 September 30, Holly Greenhagen, “Stitches in Time”, Chicago Reader:
      Hers is an obscure profession; museumgoers are seldom aware of the extent to which the pieces of clothing in exhibits have been examined or of the knowledge and care that goes into mending and cleaning them--or consciously leaving them unmended or uncleaned.
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  24. westcoast
    • 1988 September 30, Robert Heuer, “Free Lunch”, Chicago Reader:
      Marty Rodick, an out-of-town radio reporter who attends sports events around the country and sends reports to a westcoast network, spoke authoritatively on the subject of free food.
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  25. yuks
    • 1988 September 30, Lawrence Bommer, “Othello”, Chicago Reader:
      Worst of all, Payne makes Peter DeFaria play the small part of the clown as a blind man--for whatever paltry yuks that doesn't provide.
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Sequestered[edit]