User:Visviva/Reader 19881007

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This is a list of lowercase non-hyphenated single words found in the 1988-10-07 issue of the Chicago Reader which did not have English entries in the English Wiktionary when this list was created (2009-01-20).

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57297 tokens ‧ 44358 valid lowercase tokens ‧ 7436 types ‧ 73 (~ 0.982%) words before cleaning ‧ 

1988-10-07[edit]

  1. adultlike
    • 1988 October 7, Helene R. Baker, “Found a Peanut”, Chicago Reader:
      For most of the show, the older children predictably do the most damage to the utopian group; the younger children simply adopt the adultlike bad behavior of their elders.
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  2. associational
    • 1988 October 7, Justin Hayford, “Communion and Confusion”, Chicago Reader:
      Instead of making a point, Roth shows us a detail, but a detail packed with layers of associational meaning.
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  3. beanbrain
    • 1988 October 7, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      Looks like the real beanbrain is you, not your reader!
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  4. bloodhungry
    • 1988 October 7, Achy Obejas, “Calendar”, Chicago Reader:
      Duane Jones, who played the last survivor in George Romero's classic Night of the Living Dead, is the bloodhungry lead of Ganja and Hess, a dark and smoky 1973 classic of black horror cinema directed by Pill Gunn.
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  5. boinging
    • 1988 October 7, Peter Friederici, “Auction”, Chicago Reader:
      At its most extreme it is reminiscent of the boinging and buzzing of a Jew's harp.
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  6. bonneted
    • 1988 October 7, John Kennedy, “"Here is the place!"”, Chicago Reader:
      In "Corn Planting," bonneted women array themselves at the edge of a field in a line that stretches into the distance like a military drill formation.
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  7. bunkerish
    • 1988 October 7, Ted Cox, “The Sports Section”, Chicago Reader:
      Hole number one is a rather ordinary dogleg right; a high, bunkerish ridge on the right-hand side of the fairway is the sole unusual feature, but once over this the fairway rolls directly up into the green.
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  8. butcherblock
    • 1988 October 7, Bill Wyman, “Reading: Lennon Mania”, Chicago Reader:
      "He can sit naked by the hour with his feet up on the butcherblock table and his dick lying in his lap like a sleeping pet .
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  9. codefendants
    • 1988 October 7, John Conroy, “Minimum Security”, Chicago Reader:
      Guys who are inside for a long time, Tuesday and Thursday were big days because their codefendants might come through, they get the news from other places.
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  10. commercialists
    • 1988 October 7, Harold Henderson, “Saved Form the Sandsuckers”, Chicago Reader:
      Both sides--the "commercialists" and the "conservationists"--blitzed with outside endorsements, tours, advertisements, fliers, newspaper articles, and radio and TV publicity.
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  11. concertgoing
    • 1988 October 7, Harold Henderson, “The City File”, Chicago Reader:
      And you thought those coughs were part of the concertgoing experience.
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  12. defeatedly
    • 1988 October 7, Laura Molzahn, “Between Heaven and the Gargabe Can”, Chicago Reader:
      And I was not surprised that the audience thought the piece was over and began applauding when Shukofsky stopped reading and the lights went down on the four dancers standing defeatedly with their backs to the audience and about as far away from us as they could get.
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  13. developpe
    • 1988 October 7, Laura Molzahn, “Between Heaven and the Gargabe Can”, Chicago Reader:
      Performing a curiously melancholy, undulating developpe, the dancers point their legs at each other like accusing fingers.
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  14. dismissably
    • 1988 October 7, Bill Wyman, “Reading: Lennon Mania”, Chicago Reader:
      Where Ringo was dismissably cute, George disturbingly strange, Paul sometimes OK but suspiciously maudlin--indeed, where Dylan was depressing, the Stones boring, and the Who moribund--John Lennon, retained our affection and somehow, particularly during the quiet years, earned more of it and gained our respect back as well.
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  15. dockominiums
    • 1988 October 7, Hank De Zutter and Pamela Little De Zutter, “Invasion of the FIPs: boom time in southwestern Michigan”, Chicago Reader:
      Like the condominiums and "dockominiums" in nearby New Buffalo, the restaurant symbolizes the opulent aspect of the Chicago invasion, the arrival of Gold Coast sophistication to a neglected lakeside backwater.
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  16. dunelands
    • 1988 October 7, Harold Henderson, “Saved Form the Sandsuckers”, Chicago Reader:
      " Like other dunelands on Lake Michigan's southern and eastern shores, it has unusually diverse plant and animal life; unlike the others, it has the three smaller lakes on the landward side--part of an "embayment" cut off by sand spits several thousand years ago, as prehistoric Lake Michigan dropped by gradual stages to its current level.
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  17. ensembling
    • 1988 October 7, Dennis Polkow, “New Works by Local Composers”, Chicago Reader:
      Some of the violin playing was inaudible during this section, and there was an ensembling problem between horn and trombone, but the movement was given an atmospheric reading and was full of dynamic contrast.
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  18. escapeland
    • 1988 October 7, Hank De Zutter and Pamela Little De Zutter, “Southwestern Michigan”, Chicago Reader:
      Like C. S. Lewis's Narnia, the southwest tip of Michigan is an accessible escapeland, just an hour and a half from the city yet worlds apart.
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  19. etouffe
    • 1988 October 7, John Kennedy, “"Here is the place!"”, Chicago Reader:
      I'm not sure when it first struck me that my ignorance of Swedes, for a son of the midwest, was a dereliction comparable to someone raised in Lafayette, Louisiana, never having danced the Cajun two-step and not knowing etouffe from jambalaya.
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  20. experimentalism
    • 1988 October 7, Bill Wyman, “Reading: Lennon Mania”, Chicago Reader:
      A case in point is the way he passes along one of John's more farfetched utterances, that groups like the B-52s (and by extension other dance-oriented new wave bands like Talking Heads) were inspired by Yoko's experimentalism in the early 70s.
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  21. faddism
  22. flourless
    • 1988 October 7, Hank De Zutter and Pamela Little De Zutter, “Southwestern Michigan”, Chicago Reader:
      Miller's Country House in Union Pier, the cla$$iest place in the area, with Pan-Asian specialties, a popular rack of lamb, and a flourless chocolate cake that some Chicagoans send out for; 616-469-5950.
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  23. funksters
    • 1988 October 7, Bill Wyman, “Camper Van Beethoven/Walter Salas-Humara”, Chicago Reader:
      Camper Van Beethoven you know about: the absurdist cowboy funksters from Santa Cruz, California, whose new record (and major-label debut) Our Beloved Revolutionary Sweetheart, fulfills the promises and more of every indie band of all time.
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  24. groupiedom
    • 1988 October 7, Bill Wyman, “Reading: Lennon Mania”, Chicago Reader:
      It's likely he exaggerates, but a biography telling us that John did heroin, acted oddly after having been a Beatle for ten years, supped on the fruits of groupiedom, or fought with his strong-willed wife is hardly something to raise our eyebrows about.
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  25. hagiographical
    • 1988 October 7, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Liberals in Hiding”, Chicago Reader:
      The camera's hagiographical treatment of River Phoenix may get a little sticky in spots, but it's one indication of his talent as an actor and Danny's depth as a character that the movie usually get's away with it.
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  26. handpainted
    • 1988 October 7, Hank De Zutter and Pamela Little De Zutter, “Southwestern Michigan”, Chicago Reader:
      The Local Color Gallery on the Red Arrow Highway in Union Pier offers art by 70 local artists, including handpainted shirts by Judy Signorino--Mrs. Slug--and daughters Sami and Susie; 616-469-5332.
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  27. heavyhandedness
    • 1988 October 7, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Liberals in Hiding”, Chicago Reader:
      The weaknesses of the film are twofold: an inability to convey any convincing grasp of the present beyond the family's present (and ongoing) situation, and a belt-and-suspenders heavyhandedness that has always been Lumet's biggest stumbling block in driving home a dramatic climax.
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  28. hippiedom
    • 1988 October 7, Helene R. Baker, “Found a Peanut”, Chicago Reader:
      Whether the national obsession with the 1960s is due more to nostalgia or curiosity (for those of us too young to remember much), the focus, not surprisingly, has been on the turbulent latter part of the decade, which gave birth to hippiedom and the culture of youth that is still evident today.
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  29. housedress
    • 1988 October 7, Judy Robb, “Restaurant Tours: a diner to fly for”, Chicago Reader:
      Betty Schlafer, head honcho of the Airport Cafe, is wearing a housedress with a purple floral design; a brooch filled with colored stones is pinned to her collar.
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  30. jewellike
    • 1988 October 7, Harold Henderson, “Saved Form the Sandsuckers”, Chicago Reader:
      They roamed the winding roads, climbed to the top of the highest dunes, and fished from the tiny jewellike lakes.
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  31. kilocalories
    • 1988 October 7, Cecil Adams, “The Straight Dope”, Chicago Reader:
      The average adult human requires about 2,700 kilocalories of energy per day.
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  32. leatherwork
    • 1988 October 7, John Conroy, “Minimum Security”, Chicago Reader:
      "Like on the leatherwork, you make a belt and a wallet, then what're you gonna do?
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  33. lefsa
    • 1988 October 7, John Kennedy, “"Here is the place!"”, Chicago Reader:
      I remember those long minutes, sitting between some Olsons and Hansons, and fixing my mind on the only thing I'd come for: a thin slice of tender Swedish lefsa bread, generously buttered and rolled tight with brown sugar into a soft cylinder of Nordic indulgence.
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  34. looseners
    • 1988 October 7, John Kennedy, “Bishop Hill, Illinois”, Chicago Reader:
      Jordbruksdagama (according to the Utopian, the local free guide paper, that's pronounced YORD brewks dog ah nuh), is the annual harvest celebration, usually held in late September, it features the gamut of traditional Colony activities, and, of course, Swedish baked goods and other belt looseners.
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  35. minizoo
    • 1988 October 7, Hank De Zutter and Pamela Little De Zutter, “Southwestern Michigan”, Chicago Reader:
      Also in Indiana is the area's only real city--Michigan City, of course--some dollar-a-ticket, nearly first-run movie houses, a superb public library designed by Stanley Tigerman, and a minizoo at its lakefront Washington Park.
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  36. multiscreen
    • 1988 October 7, Anthony Adler, “Some Men Need Help”, Chicago Reader:
      That theater's a multiscreen movie complex now, but it used to house an in-the-round stage with fat, soft, fall-asleep seats and lots of garish red carpeting.
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  37. nonaccredited
    • 1988 October 7, John Conroy, “Minimum Security”, Chicago Reader:
      The camp also offers GED classes, and occasionally there are nonaccredited classes offered through the University of Wisconsin at Baraboo.
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  38. nonensemble
    • 1988 October 7, Lawrence Bommer, “Coastal Disturbances”, Chicago Reader:
      Second: He Impetuously Pursues Her. ) Jeff Bauer's cloud projections have more personality than Brailsford's generic nonensemble.
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  39. nonowners
  40. nonsnitches
    • 1988 October 7, John Conroy, “Minimum Security”, Chicago Reader:
      The camp is divided into the snitches and the nonsnitches.
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  41. overdeliberation
    • 1988 October 7, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Liberals in Hiding”, Chicago Reader:
      As far back as the 60s, around the time that Annie and Arthur Pope were meeting in college, Lumet was already committing similar errors in overdeliberation by cutting a jarring close-up of Katharine Hepburn into a beautifully modulated retreating camera movement during her final monologue in Long Day's Journey Into Night (1962), and juicing up a script that was already melodramatically overwrought in The Pawnbroker (1965) with portentous mise en scene.
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  42. overdevelopment
    • 1988 October 7, Hank De Zutter and Pamela Little De Zutter, “Invasion of the FIPs: boom time in southwestern Michigan”, Chicago Reader:
      This summer eyebrows were raised when a Pizza Hut appeared right next to Redamak's in New Buffalo, one of the area's most popular family restaurants, but the threat of lopsided, uncontrolled overdevelopment seems distant to many--local residents and Chicagoans alike--who regard the rediscovery of the area as a welcome return to its heyday in the 1930s and '40s, when even more Chicago families spent their summers here.
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  43. philistines
    • 1988 October 7, Anthony Adler, “Some Men Need Help”, Chicago Reader:
      Quiet and comfortable where the Drury Lane was loud and plush, earnest and intelligent where the Drury Lane's every curlicue fairly screamed with a calculated vulgarity--as if to say, "Relax, folks, we're all philistines here; we're not gonna throw you anything that's over your head"--the Victory Gardens invites a more sophisticated response.
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  44. phonily
    • 1988 October 7, Lawrence Bommer, “Coastal Disturbances”, Chicago Reader:
      Suffering from a sterility much like Ariel's and cooing phonily, Andre tries to woo Holly by launching into an endless and unsolicited family history that, however poetic, can't hide the fact that Holly is one more beautiful thing Andre intends to collect.
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  45. reclusion
    • 1988 October 7, Bill Wyman, “Reading: Lennon Mania”, Chicago Reader:
      If he began to wonder why Yoko Ono loved John, he'd have to wonder why we did--why we did and continued to, through bed-ins and silly pronouncements, through good albums and bad, through heroin and reclusion.
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  46. ricelike
    • 1988 October 7, Judy Robb, “Restaurant Tours: a diner to fly for”, Chicago Reader:
      The selection for the main course is browned pork roast (with more applesauce), meatloaf, baked chicken, amazing ricelike Polish noodles with chicken and broth, boiled potatoes, thick brown gravy, and an assortment of rolls and bread.
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  47. sandsuckers
  48. sermonizer
    • 1988 October 7, John Kennedy, “"Here is the place!"”, Chicago Reader:
      Before long, Jansson--who'd probably be played by Willem Dafoe today if anybody could sell a major studio on a Lutheran epic set in the midwest--had acquired a reputation as a riveting sermonizer.
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  49. uninsistent
    • 1988 October 7, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Liberals in Hiding”, Chicago Reader:
      And part of the uninsistent beauty of Foner's screenplay is that it doesn't take the usual tack of treating separate generations as mutually exclusive entities.
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  50. uprush
    • 1988 October 7, Bill Wyman, “Reading: Lennon Mania”, Chicago Reader:
      A terrifying uprush of emotion, like a hysteric's fit, comes bursting out.
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  51. utopianism
    • 1988 October 7, John Kennedy, “"Here is the place!"”, Chicago Reader:
      Bishop Hill Colony was one of a handful of 19th-century midwestern experiments in utopianism.
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  52. utopians
    • 1988 October 7, John Kennedy, “Bishop Hill, Illinois”, Chicago Reader:
      Abundant literature is available there on the Colony, its people, and Swedes and utopians in general.
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Sequestered[edit]